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KING PRESS NO. 3O3 



ORIGINES 
PAROCHIALES SCOTIA. 





THE ANTIQUITIES 



ECCLESIASTICAL AND TERRITORIAL 



SCOTLAND. 




VOLUME SECOND. 
IN TWO PARTS. PART II. 



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A TABLE 

O !' 

THE CONTENTS OF VOLUME II. 
PART II. 



ADVERTISEMENT 
PREFACE 



DIOCESE OF R O S S. 

KINTAIL .... 391,836 

LOCHALSH . .... 395,836 

LOCHCARKON . . . 398,83(5 

APPLECROSS . . . 402,830 

GAIBLOCH ...... 405,836 

LOCHBEOOM ...... 407, 83G 

KINCARDINE . . . 4]^ 

EDDERTOUN ..... 414 

TAIN . . . 416,830 

TARBAT . .... 433,837 

^ TI G<J . . . 454,837 

KILMUIH EASTEK ... .. . 459 

LOGIE EASTER ..... 406, 838 

ROSKEEN ...... 468,838 

ALNESS ...... 472 

KILTEARN ...... 477 

LUMLAIR . . . . . 481, 838 

DINGWALL . .... 484, 838 

FODDERTY . . . 498, 839 



TABLE OF 

KlXXETTES . . . 501 

CONTIX ..... 504 

KILMOBACK . 507,840 

URRAY . . 518 

KILCHRIST . 522 

KILLEARNAN . . 524,840 

KILMUIR WKSTKII . 531 

SUDDV . 537 

AVOCII .... . 541,843 

LOGIE WESTKU ..... 548 

URQUUART .... 551 

CULLICUDDEN ..... 552 

KlRRMICHAEL ..... 556 

CROMARTV . . . 558,843 

KOSEMARKIE ..... 567, 843 

LOCUIXETHKRKTH ..... 593, 845 

KYXTERYTH ..... 593 

ARDERSIER 593 



DIOCESE OF CAITHNESS. 

DORXOCH ...... 597, 845 

GOLSPIE ...... 648,845 

CRIECH ...... 684 

ASSYNT ...... 692 

LAIRG ...... 697 

DURXESS . .... 701,845 

FARR ...... 707,846 

ROGART ...... 718 

CLYXE ...... 722 

LOTH . . . 730 

KILDOXAN . . 734,846 



THE CONTENTS. 

REAY .... 742,846 

THCRSO .... 747,846 

HALKIRK (Modern) .... 755 

SKINNET . ... 756 

HALK.IRK (Ancient) .... 757 

SPITTAL ...... 757 

LATHERON ...... 762 

WlCK - . . 771,846 

WATTEN ..... 731 

BOWER ..... 783 

OLRICK ..... 786 

DUNNET .... 788 

CANNISBAY . . ... 791,846 



DIOCESE OF ARGYLE. 

DEANEKY OF KINTYRE. 

KlNTYRE ..... 819 

KlLBLANE ...... 820 

KlLCHOUSLAND ..... 821 

KlLMAROW . . . 821 

KlLLEAN . . . 821 

KlI.CALMONEI,L ..... 821 

KlLBERRY ...... 822 

NORTH KXAHDALE ... . 822 

DEANERY OF GLASSARY. 



GLASSARY 
DUNOOX 



TABLE OF 



STUACHUR 
LOCHGOILHEAI) 

KlLMORICH 

TNVERAHAY 



823 
823 

824 
824 



DEANERY OF GLASSARY OR OF LORN. 



KlLMARTIX 

CHAIGXISH 



824 
825 



DEANERY OF LORN. 



KlI.CHATTAN 
KlLBRANDON 
KlLBHIDE . 
KlLMORE 
KlLCHRENAN 

IXISHAII, 
MUCKAIKX . 
GLENORCHY 

AllDCHATTAX 
LlSMORE 



825 
825 
826 
826 
826 
827 
827 
827 
827 



DEANERY OF MORVERN. 



KLANFINAN 

AKASAIG 

GLEXELW 



828 
829 
82!) 



THE CONTENTS. 



DIOCESE OF THE ISLES. 

KlXGARTH ..... 831 

KOTHESAY ...... 832 

KlLBRIDE ...... &33 

KILMORIE .... . 833 

KILAKROW .... . 833 

KILCHOMAN ..... 833 

COLONSAY ...... 833 

IONA .... 834 

KlLNINIAN ...... 835 

SOROBY ...... 835 

KlRKAPOLL ..... 835 

COLL ...... 835 

KILDONAN ...... 836 

CANNA ...... 836 

UIG 836 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



IN announcing the completion of the SECOND VOLUME of this Work, 
entirely from the pen of Mr. BRICHAN, and which bears the impress of 
that laborious research and patient investigation for which that gentle 
man is so distinguished, the Publisher ventures to solicit attention to its 
usefulness and importance as an historical record, containing, as it does, 
so many matters of importance to all Scotsmen never before given in 
a collected view, and drawn chiefly from original documents, throwing 
much light upon the history, antiquities, and manners of the country, 
from the most remote periods on record. The present Part contains 
the Dioceses of Ross and CAITHNESS, with additions to the Dioceses of 
ARGYLE and the ISLES in the form of an Appendix. 

The two Volumes embrace a large portion of the South of 
Scotland, rich in ecclesiastical remains, and the whole Western Coast 
and Isles as well as the Northern Peninsula, hitherto unillustrated by 
any writer conversant in antiquities. 

It is believed that the history of the many Churches, Districts, 
and Families here given, the fixing of previously doubtful localities, and 
the successful correction of traditionary and local errors, will give satis 
faction to all who take an interest in Scottish antiquities. 



THE PKEFACE. 



THE learned editor of the first part of the present volume has remarked that the 
chief interest of that part is ecclesiastical and centres in the great parent institution 
of lona whose history is there detailed. It will be found that the chief interest of 
the second part now published arises from a different source. The records of the 
bishopricks of Boss and Caithness are not known to exist ; and those of the priory 
of Beauly and the abbey of Fearn, the former of which were extant in the seven 
teenth century, cannot now be found the principal materials of their scanty early 
history existing in copies of some Beauly charters preserved by Macfarlane and in the 
original of at least one of the later Fearn charters preserved at Balnagown. A single 
document of early date and of great interest already printed by the Bannatyne Club, 
the charter of Bishop Gilbert instituting the chapter of Caithness, is still in the 
Dimrobin charter chest, in which are also some later documents relative to the 
ecclesiastical lands. The religious houses which existed in the diocese of Caithness, 
none of them of great extent or wealth, seem to have decayed at a comparatively 
early period, almost verifying the remark of an old writer quoted in the text, that 
the climate was too cold and the soil too barren ' for that fry to nestle in.' Memo 
rials indeed of an era preceding all written records will be found in the following 
parochial histories in the case of churches and other localities still bearing the 
names of Saint Columba of Hi, of Saint Malrube of Applecross, of Saint Congan of 
Lochalsh, and even of Saint Ninian of Galloway, with other saints of less note. But 
two centuries have passed since the church of Saint Barr of Dornoch was removed. 



THE PREPACK. 



and the day of his anniversary was held as a fair to a still later period. The saint 
himself is now forgotten in the place, but the memory of Saint Fergus of Wick is 
still preserved in the parish whose church was dedicated to his honour. Traces also 
of Norse occupation and power will be seen in part of the ecclesiastical histories 
here given. The interesting and not very recent notices of the church of Kildoiuin 
and its connexion with the abbey of Scone a connexion apparently in some manner 
depending on that of the earls of Caithness and Orkney with the earls of Athole 
scarce form an exception from the general rule ; and altogether the materials available 
for a parochial church history of the two dioceses are meagre in the extreme. 

The great interest therefore of the present part is territorial, and lies chiefly in 
the authentic history of certain districts including that of the prevailing families, now 
presented to the reader in a form and with a minuteness entirely unprecedented in 
the fixing of several previously doubtful localities and in the successful correction of 
various local and traditionary errors. As examples of territorial connected with family 
history may be mentioned the histories of the earls of Ross of the Bissets and other 
families of the Ard of the lordship of Ardmanach of the baronies of Avoch. 
Cromarty, Skelbo, and Pronsy of the earldom of Sutherland of the districts of 
Assynt and Strathnaver of the lands in Caithness held by the Federeths, Chens. 
Keiths, Sutherlands, Sinclairs, and Oliphants and of the older and also the more 
recent earldom of Caithness. Even the short notice of the somewhat modern family 
of Grot is not without its interest, and many others might be instanced. 

The obscurity which rested on the early history of the Freskyns of Moray and 
Sutherland has not been removed ; but their possession of the district originally 
named Sudrland ( Suthyrlandia) at a period probably anterior to that of Hugh the 
son of Freskyn the property of Strathnaver, held at a period scarcely less remote 
by their kinswoman Johanna the wife of Freskyn of DiuTus and the undoubted fact 
of the lineal descent of the present earls of Sutherland from Hugh Freskyn render 
it very probable that the connexion of the family with the territory of Sutherland 
stretches much farther into antiquity than we have now the means of fixing with 
certainty. Of the descent of the earls of Caithness from the Norwegian jarls of 
Caithness arid Orkney there can be no doubt, the dubious point in connecting their 



THE PREFACE. xxi 

history being the time and manner of the division of the old Caithness district, a 
point involved in the same obscurity with the early history of the Freskyns. 

As instances of the ascertainment of doubtful localities we have in the present 
part the identification of the site of Ethirdover (formerly supposed to be Eddertoun 
on the Dornoch Firth) with that of the Redcastle or castle of Ardmanach in Kil- 
learnan a matter left unsettled by the acute and learned Lord Hailes, and since 
undecided by antiquarians ; of the promontory named Torfnes (formerly believed to be 
Tarbatness in Boss) with Trouphead in BamTshire ; and perhaps also of the district 
of Strathnaver with the Dales of Caithness the latter being usually identified with 
Dale in Halkirk. The site of Dunscath, formerly fixed, is confirmed by the notices 
now given, especially by those in which it is connected with the ferry of Cromarty 
and included in the lordship of Ardmanach, lying, with the single exception of 
Dunscath, on the south side of the Cromarty Firth, It may not be out of place 
to intimate an opinion not hazarded in the text, that the Dufeyras of the Sagas, 
an emporium of Moray and hitherto conjectured to be Banff, was no other than the 
old Roman station in the parish of Duff us, known to geographers as Alata Castra 
and Ptoroton, to which its Norse occupiers subsequently applied their usual term 
Burgh, and which still bears the name Burghead. 

Of the correction of local or traditionary errors the intelligent reader local or 
general will detect many interesting examples. An instance will be found in the case 
of the romantic Ross-shire lake Lochmaree, originally known as Lochewe (the name 
still applied to the arm of the Atlantic into which it falls), subsequently styled Loch- 
mulruy from a chapel or cemetery on one of its islands dedicated to Saint Malrube, 
and latterly corrupted into Lochmaree (Loch Malreeve) and locally fancied to be 
named from the Virgin Mary. A conjecture given in a foot-note relative to the 
etymology of the name Dunrobin may be worth the attention of the antiquary, espe 
cially as the authentic history of the district and of its earls proves that the usual 
etymology is wholly fanciful. 

In addition to the three points of special interest now indicated a fourth will 
occasionally occur to the reader in the curious forms of rent, tenure, and measures 
of land anciently prevalent in the districts embraced in the present part, some of 



XX11 THE PREFACE. 

which appear to be entirely local, while others have been imported from Orkney or 
from Norway. 

There is in the General Register House a very interesting rent-roll of the earldom 
of Sutherland dated early in the sixteenth century, which might have been given in 
the appendix, but is rather too lengthy for that purpose. 

The author of the present volume and of a large part of Vol. I. is solely respon 
sible also as editor for that portion of the work which embraces the history of the 
diocese of Caithness, and for the appendix in its present shape. For ready access to 
the materials from which that history is compiled he has been much indebted to the 
courtesy of His Grace the Duke of Sutherland of the late James Loch Esquire 
of Uppat of U. Gray Esquire, Golspie of David Laing Esquire of the Signet 
Library, secretary to the Bannatyne Club of Joseph Robertson Esquire, author of a 
large portion of Vol. I. and of Cosmo Innes Esquire, P. C. S., editor of the greater 
part of the Work. 

JAMES B. BIUCHAN. 

Edinburgh, October, 1855. 



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ORIGINES 



PAROCHIAL ES S C T I 



ORIGINES PAROCHIALES SCOTLE: 



KINTAIL. 

Kyntaill ' Kintale 2 Kintaill 3 Kildowich. 4 (Map, No. 1.) 

ABOUT the middle of the last century Kintail was divided into two parishes, Kintail and Glensheil. 

The old and extensive parish of Kintail is bounded on the south by Glenelg, runs northward 
along the boundary between Inverness and Ross as far as Loch Monar, and has on the north 
west the water of Long and the salt-water lochs Lochlong and Lochalsh. It is deeply indented 
by Loch Duich, a salt-water loch running southward from the junction of the former two. 
The district is entirely mountainous, and attains its greatest height in Tullochard OH the 
north of Loch Duich. 6 Its chief valleys are Glensheil, Glenlichd, and Glenelchaig. 7 

There appears to be no notice of this church before the Reformation, except its entry in 
the Libellus Taxationum. 8 It was a common church of the canons of Ross. In 1574 King 
James VI. presented John Murchesoun ' to the haill commoun kirk baith parsonage and vica 
rage of Kintale.' 9 In 1582 the same king presented Donald Murchesoun to the same church, 
then vacant by the demission of John Murchesoun. 10 

The church, apparently dedicated to Saint Duthace bishop of Ross, stood at Kilduieh at the 
head of Loch Duich. 11 It was burned in 1719, and has been since repaired or rebuilt. 1 - The 
church of Glensheil was built in 1758 east of Loch Duich on the estate of Letterfearn. 13 

In Baiamund's Roll the church is rated at 53s. 4d. ; in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued at 
26, 13s. 4d. u In 1574 Mr. John Murchesoun reader at Kintale had 18 as his yearly stipend. 15 

The lands of Kintail are said to have been granted by King Alexander III. to Colin an 
Irishman of the family of Fitzgerald for service done at the battle of Largs. The charter is not 
extant and its genuineness has been doubted. 16 In 1292 the sheriffdom of Skey, erected bv King 

1 Circa A.D. 1535. Libellus Taxationum. 14 MSS. in Adv. Lib. lb Book of Assignations. 

2 A.D. 1574. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 89. 16 The following are its terms as found in a copy of 

3 A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. A. D. 1582. the 17th century, said to be in the handwriting of tlw 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 51. first earl of Cromerty. 

4 A. D. 1600-1640. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. MS. Alexander Dei gratia rex Scottorum omnibus probif 
Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. hominibus tocius terre sue clericis et laicis salutem. 

5 New Stat Ace. 6 Old and New Stat. Ace. Sciant presentes et futuri me pro fideli seruicio mic/ii 
7 New Stat. Ace. 8 MS. in Adv. Lib. navato per Colinum Hybernnm tarn in hello quam in 

9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 89. pace idea dedisse et hac presenti carlo, mea concessisse 

10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 51. dicto Colino et ejus successoribus tolas terras de Kintailc- 

11 Macfarlane. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. Old Tenendas de nobis et successoribus nostrit in liberam 
Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. baroniamcumgnardia- Reddendo servicium forimecum 

12 Old Stat Ace. New Stat Ace. 13 New Stat. Ace. et fidelitatem Testibui Andrea episcopo Moraviensi 



392 ORIGINES [KIXTAIL. 

John Balliol, included the lands of the earl of Eos in North Argail, a district which comprehended 
Kintail and several other large parishes in Ross. 1 Between 1306 and 1329 King Robert Bruce 
confirmed to the earl of Ross all his lands, including North Argyle (Borecdis Ergadia)? In 1342 
William earl of Ross, the son and heir of the deceased Hugh earl of Ross, granted to Reginald 
the son of Roderic (Ranald Rorisoune) of the Isles the ten davachs (or ten pennylands) of Kintalc 
in North Argyle. 3 The grant was afterwards confirmed by King David II.* About the year 
1340 Ranald was succeeded by his sister Amie the wife of John of Isla. 5 Between the years 
1362 and 1372 William earl of Ross, the son and heir of the deceased Hugh earl of Ross, 
exchanged with his brother Hugh of Rosse lord of Fylorth and his heirs his lands of all 
Ergile, with the castle of Elandonan, for Hugh's lands in Buchan. 6 

In 14C3 the lands of Kintail were held by Alexander Mackenzie. 7 Kenneth his son, who suc 
ceeded him, was dead before 1493, and was succeeded by his son Kenneth Oig. 8 In 1509 King 
Jame.s IV. granted to John Makkenze of Keantalle (the brother of Kenneth Oig) the 40 mark- 
lands of Keantalle, namely, the davach of Cumissaig, the davach of Letterfearn, the davach of 
Gleanselle, the davach of Glenlik, the davach of Letterchall, the two davachs of Croo, and three 
davachs between the water of Keppaeh and the water of Lwyng, with the castle and fortalice of 
Eloandonnan, in the earldom of Ross and sheriifdom of Innernis, with other lands in Ross, which 
John had resigned, and which the king then erected into the barony of Eleandonan. 9 In 1530 
King James V. granted to James Grant of Freuchy and Johne M'Kinze of Kintale liberty to go to 
any part of the realm on their lawful business. 10 In 1532, 1538, and 1540 the same John M'Kenich 
of Kintaill appears in record. 11 In 1542 King James V. granted to John M'Kenzie of Kintaill 
the waste lands of Monar, lying between the water of Gleneak on the north, the top or summit 
of Landovir on the south, the torrent of Towmuk and Inchelochill on the east, and the water of 
Bernis running into the water of Long on the west and also the waste lands of lie Ned, lying 
between Loch Boyne on the north, Loch Tresk on the south, lie Ballach on the west, and Dawelach 
on the east in the earldom of Ross and sheriffdom of Innernes lands which were never in the 
king's rental and never yielded any revenue for the yearly payment of 4 to the king as earl 
of Ross. 1 - In 1543 Queen Mary granted to Kenneth Mackenze of Kintaill and Isabel Stewart his 
wife the lands of Auchnaceyric, Lakachane, Strome-ne-mowklach, Kilkinterne, the two Ratega- 
nis, Torlousicht, Auchnashellicht, Auchnagart, Auchcwrane, lie Knokfreith, Aucharskelane, and 

Wallero Stewart' Ihnrico de BaliotK camerario Ar- ' Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. p. 91. 

mildo de Campania- Tlicmia Ilostiario vicecomitc de ' 2 Rob. Index, p. 16, no. 7. Regist. Moraviensc, p. 342. 

Jimeriies- Apnd Kincardine ix die Ja.nua.rii anno '> Rob. Index, p. 48, no. 1; p. 99; p. 100, no. 1. 4 Ibid. 

rcflni domini regie xvi. 5 Gregory, p. 27. 6 Balnagown Charters. 

If tlie charter be genuine, it is not of Alexander III. " Gregory, p. 83. 8 Ibid. Acta Dom. Cone., p. 327. 

or connected with the battle of Largs (1263). Two of 9 Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. xv. no. 89. Gregory, p. 83. 

the witnesses, Andrew bishop of Moray and Henry de 10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. viii. fol. 149. 

Ii.-illicil chamberlain, would correspond with the IGth " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. Ill ; vol. xii. fol. 21 ; 

year of Alexander II. The writers of the family his- vol. xiv. fol. 32. 

tory of the Mackenzies assert also charters of David 12 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 417. Neither the 
II. (1360) and of Robert II. (1380) to ' Murdo filius Great Seal Record, nor any accessible map, nor the 
Kenneth! de Kintail,' but without furnishing any Statistical or other accounts, all'ord the means of de- 
description or means of testing their authenticity. tcrmining whether those lands lie ill Kintail or in 
No such charters are recorded. some of the neighbouring parishes. 



KINTAIL.] PAROCHI ALES. 393 

Malegane, in the lordship of Kintaill, and other lands in Eoss, extending in all to 36 marks, 
which he had resigned. 1 In 1551 the same queen granted to John M'Kenze of Kintaill and 
Kenzeoch M'Kenze his son and apparent heir a remission for the violent taking of John Hectour 
M'Kenzesone of Garlouch, Doull Hectoursone, and John Towach Hectoursone, and for keeping 
them in prison, ' vsurpand thairthrow our Souerane Ladyis autorite.' 2 In 1554 there appear 
in record John Mackenze of Kintaile and his son and heir apparent Kenneth Mackenze of 
Brahan (apparently the same persons that appear in 1551). 3 In 1562 there appears in record 
Kenzeoch M'Kinzie of Kintaill, apparently the heir of John.* In 1569 the same Kenzeoch was 
heir in remainder to the chapel lands of Apilcroce, then granted by Sir William Stewart the 
chaplain to Rory Makkangze and his heirs male. 5 In 1570 King James VI. granted to Coline 
Makcainze, the son and apparent heir of the deceased Canzcoch Makcainze of Kintaill, permission 
to be served heir in his minority to all the lands and rents in the sheriffdom of Innernes in 
which his father died last vest and seised, provided that his entry thus should not prejudice 
the King or those who held of him the ward and relief of the lands. 6 In 1572 the same king 
confirmed a grant made bj Colin Makcanze of Kintaill to Barbara Graunt his affianced spouse, 
in fulfilment of a contract between him and John Grant of Frewchie dated 25 April 1571, 
of his lands of Climbo, Keppach, and Ballichon, Mekle Innerrenned, Devisduan Beg, Litill 
Innerrenned, Devisduan Moir, Auchadrein, Kirktoun, Ardtulloch, Roroch, Quhissill, Tullych, 
Derewall and Nvik, Inchero, Morowoch, Glenlik, Innersell and Nuik, Achazarge, Kinloch- 
beaneharan, and Innerchonray, in the earldom of Ross and sheriffdom of Innernes, 7 In 1574 
the same Colin was served heir to his father Kenneth M'Keinzie in the davach of Lettir- 
fernane, the davach of Glenschall, and other lands, in the barony of Ellendonane, of the 
old extent of 5 marks. 8 In 1586 King James VI. granted a remission to Colin M'Kainzie 
of Kintaill and Rodoric M'Kainzie of Auchterfailie his brother for being art and part in 
the cruel murder of Rodoric M'Allester in Stroll, Gorrie M'Allester his brother in Stron- 
croag, Ronnald M'Gorrie the son of the latter John Roy M'Allane V'Allester in Peitnean, 
John Dow M'Allane V'Allester in Kirktoun of Lochcarroun, Alexander M'Allanroy, ser 
vitors of the deceased Rodoric Sir John Monro in Lochbrume, John Monro his son, John 
Monro Hucheoun and the rest of their accomplices, under silence of night upon the lands 
of Ardmanichtyke (or Ardnachfaich), Dalmartene, Kirktoun of Lochcarroun, Blahat, and other 
parts within the baronies of Lochcarroun, Lochbrume, Ros, and Kessane, in the sheriffdom of 
Innernes ; and for all other past crimes, except treason against the King's person, and the murder 
of his father, grandfather, and regent. 9 In 1633 George M'Keinzie was served heir male to his 
brother Colin Earl of Seaforth, Lord M'Keinzie of Kintail, in the lands and barony of Ellen- 
donan, including the lands of Kintaill, namely, the davach of Coysag, the davach of Letterfairne, 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 524. Reg. Sec. Sig., 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 119. 
vol. xvii. fol. 56. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 8. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiv. fol. 75. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. fol. 94. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. no. 211. 8 Retours. 

4 Coll. de Reb. Alb., pp. 143, 144. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fol. 98. 

VOL. II. 3 D 



394 ORIGINES [KIXTAIL. 

the davach of Glenlick, the davach of Glenscheill, the davach of Lettirchoull, the two davaehs 
of Croo, and three davaehs between the water of Keppach and the water of Luing, with other 
lands, together of the old extent of 20. 1 In 1669 Colin Earl of Balcarras was served heir 
to his father Earl Alexander in the barony of Handonan or Kintaill, including Kintaill, Loch- 
broome, Lochals, Lochcarrone, Kessurine, and other lands in Ross. 2 

Near the mouth of Loch Long is a small village named Dornie. 3 

Near the village, on a rock insulated at high water, are the ruins of the ancient fortress of 
Ellandonan, now known as Castle Dounan.* It is believed to have been built by King Alexander 
II. or III. as a place of defence against the Danes or Norwegians. 5 In 1331 Randolph Earl 
of Moray, then Warden of Scotland, despatched his crowner to Elandonan to prepare the castle 
for his reception, and to arrest ' mysdoaris,' fifty of whom that officer put to death, and placed 
their heads on the top of the castle walls. 6 In 1350 William Earl of Ross and lord of Sky dates 
a charter at Elandonan, and about the same period the castle was included in an exchange of his 
lands in Ergile with his brother Hugh for the latter's lands in Buchan. 7 Fordun about 1400 men 
tions Elindonan as one of the insule lacuales with a castle. 8 In 1503 Alexander Earl of Huntlie 
undertook to reduce the castles which were considered ' rycht uecessar for the danting of the His,' 
especially ' the Strome and Alanedonane,' and to furnish or raise men to keep them when reduced, 
King James IV. engaging to provide a ship with artillery for the purpose. 9 In 1509 that king, as 
before stated, granted the castle to John Makkenze with the lands of Kintail. 10 In 153!) Donald 
Gorme of Sleat and his allies, aftor laying waste Trouterness in Sky and Kenlochew in Ross, 
attempted to take the castle of Elandonan, but, Donald being killed by an arrow shot from the 
walls, the attempt failed. 11 In 1541 King James V. granted a remission to Donald's accomplices, 
namely, Archibald His alias Archibald the Clerk, Alexander M'Conill Gallich, John Dow 
Donaldsoun, Neil M'Ewin M'Lauchlane, Donald M'Ewin M'Lauchlane, Niel M'Ewiri M'Kerlich, 
Donald M'Anguis M'Ane M'Gillcrnartcne, Alexander M'Breif, Finlay M'Quene, Tarmot Ger, 
Patrik M'Conill Meill, Angus the Clerk, Gillereoch M'Queane, Donald Og, John Glas Gow, Ewin 
M'Kynnane Murchew, Rodoric Mantochsoun, Donald Dow M'Gillespe, Hector Cam, Donald 
M'Ane Roy, John Bane, Finlay M'Ferquhersoun, Donald Boreoch M'Cloid, Niel Cuke, Donald 
Keill Ranaldsoun, Gillebreid M'Gilleangane, Gillecallum M'Federis, and his brother Peter 
M'Federis, for their treasonable burning of the castle of Allanedonnand and of the boats there, 
for the ' hereschip' of Kenlochew and Trouteness, and for all past actions except treason against 
the King's person. 12 ' The castell of Ylen Donen,' says a writer of the seventeenth century, ' is 
composed of a strong and fair dungeon upon a rock, with another tower compasd with a fair 
barmkin wall, with orchards and trees, all within ane yland of the lenth of twa pair of butts 

1 Ketours. ' Balnagown Charters. 

2 Iletours. " Scotichronicon, lib. ii. cap. 10. 

3 New Stat. Ace. and Maps. Anderson's Guide, 9 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. pp. 240, 249. 
p. 282. 10 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xv. no. 89. 

* Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. Anderson, p. 282. " Gregory, pp. 145, 146. Border Minstrelsy. An- 
5 Old Stat. Ace. Anderson, p. 282. derson, p. 283. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xv. fol. 46. 

' Wyntownis Cronykil,c. xxiiii. 11. 119-144. i2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xv. fol. 47. 



J.OCHALSH.] PAEOCHIALES. 395 

almost round. It is sayd that of old that castel consisted of seaven tours.' 1 It is marked by 
Blaeu as Chastel Ylen Donen. 2 It was destroyed by a ship of war in 1719, subsequently to a 
battle fought in Glensheil between the royal troops and those of the Pretender. 3 One side 
of the tower or keep, which was 80 feet in height, and ruins of the other buildings remain. 1 

Near the manse of Kintail stood in 1790 Dounan Diarmod, a circular fort of stone 20 feet 
high and 20 feet wide. 5 

Opposite Ellandonan on the coast of Letterfearn are the remains of a circular dun named 
Castle Gruagach, of which the walls are 9 feet in thickness, and the internal diameter is 25 feet. 6 



LOCHALSH. 

Lochelch 7 Lochelsche 8 Clachan Loclialse 9 Lochals 10 Lochallis 11 
Kilchoen in Locliaelsh 12 Kilchoen 13 Lochailse. 14 (Map, No. 2.) 

THIS parish includes a long strip of land stretching from south west to north east, the southern 
portion forming a peninsula having Lochcarron on the north, and Lochalsh, Lochduich, and 
Lochlong on the south. 15 The northern and inland part is mountainous. 16 

We are informed by the Aberdeen Breviary that Saint Congan (about A. D. 600), having left 
Ireland with his sister Saint Kentigerna and her sons, Felan, Furseus, and Vlcan, landed at 
Lochelch in North Argyle, where he appears to have died, and where Saint Felan his nephew 
afterwards built a church and dedicated it to Saint Congan. 17 The subsequent history of the 
church previously to the Reformation seems to be unknown, with the exception of the fact 
that it was latterly a common church of the canons of Ross. In 1569 King James VI. pre 
sented Alexander Fraser or Moir to the parsonage of Lochelsche, 'vakand as ane commoun 
kirk of Eos.' 18 In 1574 the same Alexander was reader at Lochelshe and Lochcarroun. 19 In 
1576 King James confirmed a grant by John bishop of the Isles to the deceased Angus Mak- 
callister of Glengarrie of a markland of Clachan Lochalse. 20 In 1582 the same king presented 
Master Murdo Murchesoun to the parsonage of Lochals and Lochcarran (then apparently 
united), vacant by the decease of Alexander M'Gruder. 21 

1 Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 2 Blaeu's Map. A. D. 1582. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 59. 

3 Old Stat. Ace. Anderson, p. 280. 12 A. D. 1600-1640. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 

Old Stat. Ace. Anderson, p. 282. New Stat. Ace. 13 Circa A.D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. 

5 Old Stat. Ace. 14 Circa A.D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. 

6 Anderson, p. 285. New Stat. Ace. 15 New Stat. Ace. and County Maps. 

7 A. D. 1510. Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp. I6 New Stat. Ace. 

estiv., fol. 126. " Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, estiv., fol. 126. 

8 A. D. 1569. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 61. 18 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 61. 
A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. 19 Book of Assignations. 

9 A. D. 1576. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. fol. 83. *> Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. fol. 83. 

10 A. D. 1582. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 24. SI Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. ff. 24, 59. 



396 ORIGLNES [LOCHALSH. 

The church, dedicated to Saint Congan, stood at Kilchoan on the east shore of Lochalsh. 1 
Tlie present building was erected in 1641. 2 Saint Congan was commemorated on the 20th 
of February. 3 

In 1574 the reader at Lochelsche had for his stipend ' the haill commoun kirk of Lochelsche, 
baith personaige and vicaraige,' the value of which however is not stated.* 

The land of Lochalsh, as part of North Argyle, was included among the lands of the Earl 
of Ros, in 1292 erected with others by King John Balliol into the sheriffdom of Skey. 5 Be 
tween 1306 and 1314 also it was the property of the Earl of Ross. 6 

In 1449 the lands of Lochalche were held by Celestine the brother of John Lord of the 
Isles, styled Celestine of the Isles of Lochalche. 7 The same Celestine appears in record in 
1461, 1463, 1464, and 1472. 8 In 1463 John of Yle, Earl of Ross and Lord of the Isles, 
granted the lands of Lochalsche and others in Ross to his brother Celestine, and to his heirs 
by his wife Finvola the daughter of Lachlan Macgillcone of Dowart, with remainder to his heirs 
by any other wife (whom failing the lands were to revert to the Earl), for yearly payment of 
six pennies blench fernie. 9 In 1464 King James III. confirmed the grant. 10 Celestine died in 
1473, and was succeeded by his son Alexander, who appears in record in 1492, 1494, and 1495 
as Alexander of the Isles of Lochalch. 11 Alexander was dead in 1498, and his son Donald, 
known as Donald Galda, and also as Sir Donald of the Isles of Lochalch, held the lands of 
Lochalch till about the year 1518, and during the latter part of that period was noted for his 
turbulence. 12 In 1517 John Duke of Albany Regent appointed Colin Earl of Argyle, for 
three years or more according to the Regent's pleasure, lieutenant of the Isles and of certain 
other lands including Lochalche, for the purpose of establishing peace among the inhabitants. 13 
Sir Donald of Lochalche died about the year 1518, and left no male heir. 1 * In 1539 King 
James V. granted anew to Alexander M'Kano M'A lister of Glengarre and Margaret Ylis his 
wife in life rent, and to Angus M'Alister their son and apparent heir in heritage, the half 
of the lands of Lochelch, which with other lands in Ross had been resigned by Margaret Ylis 
(the sister and heiress of Sir Donald). 15 In 1548 Queen Mary granted to James Grant of 
Freuchy, assignee of his tenants, the liferent of the quarter davach of Inchcnarne and Ard-. 
marrach, the quarter davach of Sellach, the quarter davach of Connachry, the quarter davach of 
Ardelly, the quarter davach of Ardach and Auchtatorlyne, the half quarter davach of Nosti, the 
quarter davach of Rewrag, the half davach of Ballimchroy, the half davach of Auchnahowgych, 
the quarter davach of Cragy and Harsa, and the quarter davach of Durris, of the lands of 

1 Macf'arlane. MS. Maps in Ail v. Lib. Blacu. 9 Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. vi. no. 116. 10 Ibid. 

- Old Stat. Ace. 11 Gregory, p. 59. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiii. no. 203. 

;1 Camerarius, p. 104. Coll. de Reb. Alb., pp. 84, 85. Acta Dom. Cone., p. 359. 

1 Book of Assignations. 12 Gregory, pp. 106, 113-126. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiii. 

3 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. p. 91. no. 336; lib. xix. no. 133. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. ff. 2, 

6 Regist. Moravieuse, p. 342. Rob. Index, p. 16, 9, 26, 84, 101 ; vol. xiii. fol. 45. 

no. 7. '3 Reg Sec gig., vol. v. fol. 102. 

' Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiii. no. 186. Gregory, pp. 41,59. " Gregory, pp. 126, 218. 

b Argyle Charters. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vi. mi. 17, li Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvi. no. 247. Keg. Sue. Sig., 

116; lib. xiii, no. 203. vol. xii. fol. 78. 



LOCHALSH.] PAROCHIALES. 397 

Lochelch, of the old extent of 12 marks, the liferent of which belonged to Alaster M'Keane 
M'AJaster of Glengawrie ; and also the hereditary fee of the same 12 marklands, which be 
longed in heritage to Angus the son and heir apparent of Alaster which lands with others held 
of the Queen for service of ward and relief had been apprised for the sum of 10,770, 13s. 4d. 
in favour of James Grant for satisfaction of a ' spulzie' committed by Alaster, Angus, and their 
accomplices. 1 In 1554 (3 April) the same queen granted to John Grant, the son and heir 
of the deceased James Grant of Fruchquhy, the relief of the same lands and others which 
belonged to him in heritage. 2 In the same year (24 November) Thomas Diugwell of Kildun sold 
the same half of the lands of Lochelsche to Kenzeth Mackenze of Brahan, the son and heir apparent 
of John Mackenze of Kintaile, to whom Queen Mary granted a crown charter of the lands. 3 
In 1492 Alexander of the Isles of Lochalch granted to Ewin the son of Alan, captain of 
Clancamroun, Achenadariach and Lunde of the old extent of two marks ; Fairnamore, two 
marks ; Culwoyr and Achmoir, two marks ; Fayrinnegveg and Fudanamine, and Acheache, two 
marks ; Achechoynleich and Brayeintraye, two marks ; Culthnok, Achenacloich, Blaregarwe, 
and Acheae, two marks ; Awnernis and Wochterory, two marks ; in the lordship of Lochalch. 4 
In 1495 King James IY. confirmed the grant. 5 In 1528 the same 14 marklands were resigned by 
Ewin Alansoun of Lochiell, and for his good service King James V. erected them and others in his 
favour into the barony of Lochiell. 6 In 1539 Ewin again resigned the lands of the barony, 
including the 14 marklands of Lochalch, and the whole were then granted anew by King James 
to Ewin Allansoun in liferent, and to his nephew Ewin Cammeroun in heritage. 7 In 1548 
Queen Mary granted to John Grant of Culcabok 5 marklands in Lochelche (part of the above 
14), namely, the half davach of Achnadarrach and Lundy, the half davach of Fernagmoir, and 
the quarter davach of Farnagbeg, Fynnyman, and Auchecroy, which belonged to Ewin Donald- 
soun the nephew and heir of Ewin Alansoun, were held of the Queen by service of ward and 
relief, and with other lands were apprised in favour of John Grant for the sum of 758, 
12s. Id. as satisfaction for a ' spulzie' committed by Ewin and others. 8 In the same year the 
remaining 9 of the 14 marklands, namely, the half of the half davach commonly called the 
davach of Fernabeg, Finneman, and Auchecroy, the half davach of Auchowlycht and Briatorich, 
the half davach of Cuthok, Auchnacloch, and Blairgarrok, the half davach of Avarynnis, 
Ochtirtirie, and Achich, and the half davach of Auchmoir and Killochir which belonged in 
heritage to the same Ewin Donaldsoun, the nephew and heir of Ewin Alansoun of Lochelseli, 
were in the same manner and for the same cause apprised in favour of James Grant of Freuehv, 
to whom, as above stated, the 12 marklands called the half of Lochalsh were at the same time 
apprised. 9 In 1572 King James VI. granted to John Grant of Carron a crown charter of 
5 marklands in Lochelsche, which were alienated to him in heritage by John Grant of Culcabok, 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 314. Reg. Sec. Sig., 6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 52. 
vol. xxii. fol. 4. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiii. fol. 2. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxvii. fol. 22. 3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 263. Keg. Sec. Sig., 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. no. 211. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxii. fol. 3. 

vol. xxvii. fol. 87. 9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 314. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

4 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiii. no. 203. 5 Ibid. vol. xxii. fol. 3. 



398 ORIGINES [LOCHCARRON. 

and which had of old belonged to the deceased Ewin Donaldsone, the nephew and heir of 
the deceased Ewin Allanesoun. 1 In 1583 the same king granted in heritage to Donald 
M' Angus M'Allester of Glengarrie the nonentry and other dues of 20 lands in the earldom 
of Boss and sheriffdom of Innernes, including the 14 marklands of Lochalch, and stated to have 
been in the King's hands since the decease of Sir Donald Ylis of Lochels, Donald M'Allester's 
predecessor and 'guidame's' brother. 2 In 1611 John Grant of Glenmoristoun was served heir 
to his grandfather John Grant of Culcabock in 5 marklands in Lochalsche. 3 

In 1633 George M'Keinzie was served heir-male to his brother Colin Earl of Seaforth, 
Lord M'Keinzie of Kintail, in the lands and barony of Ellendonan, including the whole of the 
lands and towns of Lochalsche of the old extent of 26, 13s., and with Lochbrein, Kissirin, 
Assint, and Coegach, united into the barony of Lochalsche. 4 



LOCHCARRON. 

Loclicarroun 5 Loclicarran 6 Chombrich Mulruy 7 Clachan Mulruy . 8 
'(Map, No. 3.) 

THIS parish includes a long narrow strip of hilly country extending about five miles north-west 
from the river Carron and the arm of the sea called Lochcarron, from which it is named, 
together with some detached lands lying within the parish of Applecross. On the coast are 
a few islands. 

Of the church there seems to be no notice till after the Eeformation. In 1574 Alexander 
Eraser or Moir officiated as reader at Lochelsche and Lochcarroun. 9 In 1582 King James VI. 
presented Master Murdo Murchcsoun to the parsonage of Lochals and Lochcarran, vacant by 
the decease of Alexander M'Grudcr. 10 

The church, dedicated to Saint Malrube, seems to have always stood on its present site near 
the head of Lochcarron on its north-west shore. 11 The present church was built in 1751. 12 

Near Attadale are two caves, styled by the inhabitants Uagh Ashoil (the stranger's cave), 
and in their immediate neighbourhood a place of worship and a burying-ground. 13 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. fol. 95. 9 Book of Assignations. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 189. 10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. ff. 24, 59. 

1 Retours. 4 Retours. " Macfarlane. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. Mo- 

5 A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. A. D. 1600- dern Maps. The precincts of the church were of old 
1 700. Macf'arlane's Geog. Collect. Circa A. D. 1010. a girth or sanctuary, as is implied in the name Chom- 
MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. bricli Mulruy (the girth of Malrube). According to 

6 A. D. 1582. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. ff. 24, 59. the Old Stat. Ace. it was formerly known as the Great 
' A. D. 1000-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. Church of Lochcarron. 

A. D. 1GOO-1700. Macfarlane. Circa A. D. 1640. " Old and New Stat. Ace. 
MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. Old Stat. Ace. 



LOCHCARRON.] PAKOCHIALES. 399 

The district of Lochcarron, as part of the lands of the Earl of Boss in North Argyle, 
was included in the sheriffdom of Skey erected in 1292 by King John Balliol. 1 Between 1306 
and 1329 King Bobert Bruce confirmed to the Earl of Boss all his lands, which included North 
Argyle, and among these expressly the lands of Tarrodall and others, apparently in Loch 
carron. 2 

In 1463 John of Yle, Earl of Boss and Lord of the Isles, granted the lands of Lochcarryn, 
Torvirtayne, Kischernis, and others in Boss to his brother Celestine of the Isles, and to his heirs 
by Finvola the daughter of Lachlan Macgilleone of Dowart, with remainder to his heirs by any 
other wife, on whose failure the lands were to revert to the Earl. 3 In 1464 King James IV. 
confirmed the grant.* In 1517 John Duke of Albany Begent of Scotland appointed Colin 
Earl of Argyle, for three years or more at the Begent's pleasure, lieutenant of the Isles and of 
certain other lands including Lochgarron and Kissirne, for the purpose of establishing peace 
among the inhabitants. 5 

In 1472 Celestine of the Isles, lord of Lochalch, granted to Alan the son of Donald Duft' 
captain of Clancamroun, and to his heirs, with remainder to the male heirs of Ewin the son of 
Donald, the brother of Alan, the constabulary of the castle of Strome and the 12 marklands 
of Kysryner (Kishorn) in the lordship and earldom of Boss and sheriffdom of Innernes, for the 
maintenance and faithful keeping of the castle. 6 In 1492 Alexander of the Isles of Lochalch 
(the son of Celestine) granted to Ewin the son of Alan, captain of Clancamroun, 20s. of 
Stromecarranach, 20s. of Slomba, 10s. of the quarter of Dovne, and 30s. of the three quarters 
of Achinche, in the lordship of Locharrane and earldom of Boss. 7 In 149o the grant was 
confirmed by King James IV. 8 In 1528 Ewin Alansoun of Lochiell resigned the same lands 
and constabulary of Stroun, which King James V. then granted anew to him with other lands, 
which for his good service he erected in his favour into the barony of Lochiell. 9 In 1539 
(6 March) the same king granted to Alexander M'Cane M'Alister of Glengarre and Margaret 
Ylis his wife in liferent, and to their son and apparent heir Angus M'Alister in heritage, the 
castle, fortalice, and manor of the lands of Strome, and half of the lands of Lochcarne and other 
lands, in the earldom of Boss and sheriffdom of Innernys, which were resigned by Margaret 
Ylis. 10 In the same year (11 April) Ewin Allansoun resigned the lands and barony of Lochiell, 
including the lands and castle granted to him in 1528, which King James then granted anew 
to him in liferent, and to his nephew Ewin Cammeroun in heritage. 11 In 1546 Queen Mary 
granted to George Earl of Huntlie the escheat of certain lands which belonged in heritage to Ewin 
Allansoun of Lochiell, and among these the lands of Strom and Kesrom in the earldom of Boss. 12 
In 1548 the same queen granted to John Grant of Culcabok the liferent of the quarter davaeh of 
Auchinschallauch, the quarter davaeh of Dalmartyne, and the half davaeh of Torredaill, in Loch- 



1 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. p. 91. ' Ibid. 

2 Rob. Index, p. 16, nn. 5, 7. Regist. Moraviense, 9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 52. 

p. 342. 10 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvi. no. 247. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vi. no. 116. 4 Ibid. vol. xii. fol. 78. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. fol. 102. Reg. Sec. Si ff ., vol. xiii. fol. 2. 

f ' Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiii. no. 203. > 3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xx. fol. 72. 



400 OEIGINES [LOCHCAHRON. 

arron, extending to 2 marks old extent, and valued at 359 marks 3 shillings and 8 pence, belonging 
to Alestar M'Kaane M'Alestar; and also the heritage of the same 2^ marklands, belonging to 
Angus the son and apparent heir of Alestar ; which were held of the Queen by service of ward and 
relief, and were with other lands apprised in favour of John Grant for satisfaction of a ' spulzie' 
committed by Alestar, Angus, and their accomplices. 1 In the same year Queen Mary granted 
to James Grant of Freuchy the liferent of the quarter davach of Dalquharrane, the half quarter 
davach of Ruboachanc, and the half davach of Attadale. together of the old extent of 4 marks 
20 pence, of the lands of Locharrone, belonging to the same Alestar ; the heritage of the same 
lands belonging to his son Angus ; and 13 marklands old extent of Kessern, namely, the davach 
of Achbane, the davach of Auchnacreak, the davach of Stromecastell, Ardnagald, Ardnanaskene, 
and Bleyat, and the quarter davach of Tannachtan, with the castle of Strome and the office of 
constable of the same, belonging in heritage to Ewin Donaldsoun the nephew and heir of Ewin 
Alansoun of Lochelsch ; all which with other lands held of the Queen had been apprised in 
favour of James Grant for the same reason as the lands granted to John Grant. 2 In 1553 the 
Queen granted to George Earl of Huntlie the lands of Strome and Kesrome, which had been 
forfeited by Ewin Allansoun of Lochiell for the crimes of treason and lese majesty. 3 In 1554 
she granted to John Grant, the son and heir of the deceased James Grant of Fruchquhy, the 
relief of the lands- of Kessarne, Lochquharrone, and others, in the sheriffdom of Innernes. which 
belonged to him in heritage.* In 1572 King James VI. confirmed a charter by the deceased 
John Grant of Culcabok, alienating in heritage to John Grant of Carron the 1\ marklands of 
Lochcarrou granted to the former by Queen Mary in 1548. 5 In 1575 (G March) the same king 
granted to Alexander Bayne of Tulch and Anne Frascr his wife, and their heirs, with remainder 
to Alexander's heirs whomsoever, a crown charter of half the lands of Tovirtane with the salmon 
fishings in salt water and fresh, sold to them by Thomas Dingwell of Kildun. 6 In the same year 
(0 May) he granted in heritage to John Diugwell of Kildun, the son and heir of the deceased 
Thomas Dingwell of Kildun, the nonentry and other dues of the lands of Lochcarroun, Kisyrne, 
and the fortalice of Strome, in the sheriffdom of Innernes, in the King's hands since the decease 
of Thomas Dingwell in 1573, or of the last lawful possessor. 7 In the same year (5 November) 
he granted to Alexander Bane of Tullycht the nonentry and other dues of the lands of Torerdane 
and Dalmartene in the sheriffdom of Innernes, in the hands of the crown since the decease of 
Jonet and Margaret His, sisters and heiresses of those lands, or since the death of the last lawful 
possessor. 8 In 1583 the same king granted to Donald M' Angus M'Allester of Glengarrie the 
nonentry and other dues of 20 lands in the earldom of Ross and sheriffdom of Innernes, 
including 10 shillinglands of the Dun, 10s. of Slowmba, 20s. of Stroymcarroinche, 30s. of 
Midstroyme, Stromecastell, and Rerog, 40s. of Achintrait, 40s. of Achwanye, 10s. of Safnachan, 

1 Hog. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 263. Reg. Sec. Sig., 4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxvii. fol. 22. 
vol. xxii. fol. 3. '> Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. fol. 95. 

* Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 314. Reg. Sec. Sig., 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 117. 
vol. xxii. fol. 4. ^ Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. fol. 1. 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 145. 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. fol. 39. 



T.OCHCAREON.] PAROCHIALES. 401 

10s. of Blyat, 20s. of Kassor, and 10s. of Kesser, in the King's hands since the decease of 
Sir Donald Ylis of Lochels, Donald M'Allester's predecessor and ' guidarue's' brother. 1 In 1584 
King James confirmed a charter by John Dingwall of Kildun alienating to Colin M'Kainzie 
of Kintaill and the heirs male of his body, with remainder to his heirs male whomsoever 
bearing his surname and arms, the half of the lands of Achnesellache and Coulone the half of 
of Edderdacharrane, the half of Attadill, the half of Rowborchan, the half of Braclache and 
Dalmartein, held in feu by the deceased Robert Bane, with fishings in salt water and fresh, in 
the barony of Lochercarne, earldom of Ros, and sheriffdom of Innernes. 2 In the same year 
Donald M'Angus M'Alcster of Glengarrie was served heir to his grandmother Margaret of His 
in half of the lands of Auchnell, half of the lands of Arimachlag, half of the lands of Torrerdone 
with the fishings, and half of the lands of Auchinsellach, in Lochcarren, of the old extent of 
53s. 4d. 3 In 1611 John Grant of Glenmoristoun was served heir to his grandfather John Grant 
of Culcabock in 2^ marklands of Lochcarron (as in 1548 and 1572), of the old extent of 33s. 4d. 4 

In 1633 George M'Keinzie was served heir male to his brother Colin Earl of Seaforth, Lord 
M'Keinzie of Kintail, in the lands and barony of Ellendonan, including the barony of Lochalsche, 
in which was included the barony or the lands and towns of Lochcarron, namely, the towns 
and lands of Auchnaschellach, Coullin, Edderancharron, Attadill, Ruychichan, Brecklach, 
Achachoull, Delmartyne with fishings in salt water and fresh, Dalcharlarie, Arrinachteg, Achintie, 
Slumba, Doune, Stromcarronach, in the earldom of Ross, of the old extent of 13, 6s. 8d. ; and 
also the towns of Kisserin and lands of Strome with fishings in salt and fresh water, and the 
towns and lands of Torridan, with the pertinents of the castle of Strome, Lochalsche, Lochcarron, 
and Kissirin, including the davach of Achvanie, the davach of Auchnatrait, the davach of Strom- 
castell, Ardnagald, Ardnerkan, and Blaad, and the half davach of Sannachan, Rassoll, Meikle 
Strome, and Rerag, in the earldom of Ross, together of the old extent of 8, 13s. 4d. 5 

At Janetown on Lochcarron there is a small fishing village. 6 

The castle of Strome or Strone, as stated above, appears in record in the years 1472, 1528, 
1539, 1548, 1575, and 1633. 7 It appears also in 1503, in which year Alexander Earl of Huntlie 
undertook to reduce the castles which were considered necessary ' for the danting of the His', 
particularly the Strome and Alanedonane, and to supply or raise men to keep them when 
reduced, on condition that the King (James IV.) should furnish a ship and artillery for the 
purpose. 8 In 1517 Colin Earl of Argyle received power from the Lords of Council to seize, if 
possible, on the castle of Strome. 9 About the year 1602 it was besieged by Kenneth Mackenzie, 
first Lord Kintail, and surrendered to him, on which he caused it to be blown up. 10 Its ruins 
remain at the foot of a hill on Loch Kishorn named the hill of Strome. 11 

At Janetown (or Tomaclare) and at Laganduin are the remains of two of those circular 
buildings so frequent upon the west coast. 12 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 189. 9 Acta Dom. Cone., vol. xxix. fol. 211. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. fol. 58. 3 Retours. 10 Gregory, p. 302. Old Stat. Ace. 

4 Retours. 5 Ibid. Macfarlane's Gcog. Collect. Old Stat. Ace. New 
6 Anderson's Guide, p. 565. 7 See pp. 399-401. Stat. Ace. 

8 Acta Parl. Scot.,vol.ii. pp. 240,249. Gregory.p. 120. 12 Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. 
VOL. II. 3 E 



402 



ORIGINES 



[APPLECBOSS. 



APPLECEOSS. 

Aporcrossan, Apercrossan, Apuorcrosain 1 Crosain 2 Appillcroce 3 Abil- 
Cros 4 Apilcors 5 Apilcroce 6 Abilcors 7 Apilcorce, Appilcorce 8 
Chombrich-abricb 9 Combrich 10 Apilgirtb 11 Aplecroce. 12 (Map, 

No. 4.) 

THIS parish, chiefly mountainous, lies between the salt-water lochs named Loch Kishorn and 
Loch Torridon, and includes three districts, Kishorn, Applecross, and Lochs. On the coast 
there are some small islands. 

We are informed by the Irish annalists that in the year 673 Maelruba (known in Scotland 
as Saint Rufus, Malrubius, or Malrube, and commemorated on the 27th of August) founded 
the church of Aporcrossan. 13 From the same source we learn that he died at Apercrossan on 
the 21st of April 722, aged 80 years, three months, and 19 days. 14 Saint Malrube, says the 
Aberdeen Breviary, was murdered at Urquhart in Ross by Norwegians who landed on the 
coast, and who understood that he preached a different faith from theirs. He lived some days 
after receiving his death wounds, and ordered his body to be buried at Appilcroce. 15 He was 
succeeded in the rule of the monastery (as it then appears to have been) of Apuorcrossan by 
Failbe M'Guaire, who in the year 737 perished at sea along with 22 followers who manned his 
vessel. 16 The Aberdeen Breviary, without giving the date, informs us that the Danes, having 
landed at Appilcroce, violated the sacred territory of six miles round the church, insulted and 



1 Ante A. D. 1088. Tigernachi Annales. 

a Post A. D. 1088. Annal. Ulton. 

3 A. D. 1510. Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, estiv., 
fol. 90. 

A. D. 1515. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. fol. 29. 

6 A. D. 1539. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiii. fol. 26. A. D. 
1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 

6 A. D. 1540. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiii. fol. 73; vol. 
xiv. fol. 36. A. D. 1542. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xv. fol. 84. 
A. D. 1561. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxx. fol. 53. A.D. 
1569. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 119. A.D. 1574. 
Book of Assignations. A. D. 1575. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vol. xliii. fol. 17. A. D. 1576. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. 
fol. 100. A. D. 1583. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 165. 

7 A. D. 1548. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxii. fol. 38. A. D. 
1549. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiii. fol. 10. 

8 A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. 

9 A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 

10 A. IX 1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. Circa 
A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. 

11 Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. 
" A. D. 16G2. Retonrs. 

13 Tigernaclii Annales. Dr. Reeves in a paper pub 
lished in the Irish Ecclesiastical Journal for 1849 



affirms that Saint Rnfns and Saint Malrube were dif 
ferent persons. If so, they were frequently confounded 
in Scotland. Kilarrow in Islay was named also Kil- 
row, that is, the church of Malrube and the church of 
Rufus. An island off Saint Malrube's own territory of 
Applecross is named Saint Ruffus' Island. The town 
of Keith in Banff, of old called Kethmalruf (Reg. Mor. 
no. 25.) after the saint of Applecross, and where the 
annual fair is still known as Summareve (Saint Mal- 
ruve) fair, is locally and popularly said to have been 
dedicated to Saint Rufus. See Reg. Episc. Aberdon. 
vol. i. p. Ixxxvi. ; vol. ii. p. 17. 

14 Tigernachi Annales. Thomas Innes in his history 
of Scotland now in course of publication by the Spalding 
Club says that Saint Maelrubius or Mulruy was com 
memorated on the 21st of April. 

16 Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, estiv., fol. 90. 
By other authorities Saint Malrube is said to have 
been slain in Mernia, that is, in Kincardiueshire, which 
by some is by mistake rendered Nairn. Urquhart, it 
appears, was known by the Gaelic name Urchudin- 
cill-na-chrossan. Paper by Dr. Reeves above cited. 
Keith's Bishops. 

16 Tigernachi Annales. Annal. Ulton. 



APPLECBOSS.] PAEOCHIALES. 403 

robbed the priests and other ministers in contempt of Saint Malrube, and returned to their 
vessels, which were afterwards sunk in sight of land without any storm. 1 The church was after 
wards a common church of the canons of Boss. 2 This seems to complete its known history 
before the era of the Keformation. In 1574 Murquho or Murdoch Johnnestoun was reader 
at Apilcroce, and in 1575 he was presented by King James VI. to the parsonage and vicarage of 
Apilcroce, ' being ane commoun kirk of the bischoprik of Eos.' 3 In 1662 John M'Keanzie of 
Aplecroce was served heir to his grandfather Alexander Mackeanzie of Coull in the lands of 
Aplecroce and the advowson of the church.* 

The church stood at the head of the bay of Applecross on the west coast of the parish. 8 The 
building which existed in the seventeenth century is styled by a writer of the time ' a fair hieland 
kirk.' 6 The church standing in 1788 was then condemned as insufficient, and the present church 
was built in 1817. 7 Near it are the remains of an ecclesiastical building, but whether those of a 
church or of a monastery does not appear. 8 In the last century it was common with the 
inhabitants to swear by the Ider of Applecross. 9 

There was a chaplainry in Applecross, dedicated to Saint Malrube, and served by one or two 
chaplains. In 1515 King James V. presented Sir Alexander Makcloid to the two chaplainries 
within the parish church of Abilcors, when they should be vacant by the decease or inhability of 
Sir Murdoc and Sir Cristin the chaplains. 10 In 1539 the same king presented Sir John 
Donaldsoun to the chaplainry of the chapel of Saint Malrube in Apilcors, vacant by the decease 
of Sir Alexander M'Clode. 11 In 1540 (20 March) he presented Sir John Donaldsoun to the 
chaplainry of Saint Malrube in Apilcroce, vacant by the decease of Sir Christofer Johnesoun ; 
and in the same year (29 March) he granted to Master John Cameroun and Sir John Donald 
soun chaplains all the goods that belonged to the deceased chaplain, which were in the King's 
hands by reason of his having been born and died illegitimate. 12 In the same year (29 November) 
he presented Master John Cameroun to the chaplainry of Saint Malrube in Apilcroce, when it 
should be vacant by the resignation of Sir John Donaldsoun. 13 In 1542 the same king presented 
Sir Murdoc Johnsoune younger to half the chaplainry of Apilcroce, when it should be vacant by 
the resignation of Sir Murdoc Johnesoun the elder. 1 * In 1548 Queen Mary granted a similar 
presentation in favour of the same Sir Murdoc or Murquhard Jhonestoun the younger to the 
chaplainry of Saint Mulrube the martyr of Abilcors, the presentation belonging to the Queen 
during the vacancy of the see. 15 In 1549 that queen, who was patron plena jure, presented 
Sir John Donaldsoun to the chaplainry of Saint Malrube the martyr in Abilcors, vacant or when 



1 Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, estiv., fol. 90. 7 Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. 

The parish is still locally styled Comrich, -which sig- 8 Letter from Rev. John M'Qucen to Gen. Hutton, 

nifies ' girth ' or ' sanctuary.' Old and New Stat. Ace. 1789. Old and New Stat. Ace. 

Hacfarlane. In the year 800 the Irish annalists 9 Old Stat Ace. 

record the death of Macoige of Apercrosan abbot of I0 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. fol. 29. 

Bangor. ' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. fol. 17. ' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiii. fol. 26. 

3 Book of Assignations. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. 2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiii. ff. 73, 87. 

fol. 17. Rctours. 3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiv., fol. 36. 

5 Old and New Stat. Ace. County Maps. 4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xv. fol. 84. 

6 Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxii. fol. 38. In the record of 



404 OKIGINES [APPLECROSS. 

vacant by the resignation of Master John Camroun. 1 In 1561 she presented Sir William Monro 
chaplain to the chaplainry of Apilcroce within the girth of the same, vacant by the decease 
of Sir John Donaldsone. 2 In 1569 King James VI. confirmed a grant made by Sir William 
Stewart chaplain of Apilcroce, with the consent of John bishop of Eoss, the dean, and the 
canons, to Eory Makkangze and his heirs male, with remainder to Kenzeoch M'Kangze of Kintaill 
and his male heirs whomsoever bearing his arms and surname, of half of the lands of Bonnadell, 
Longoll and Achechork, Kippech, Satrell and Drumloy, Cowlmoir, Corchirie, Coulnakill, Ardes- 
tang, Scheildag, Dybege, Rischill, and Lestang, in the earldom of Eoss and sheriffdom of 
Innernes, which belonged to Sir William as the patrimony of the chaplainry. 8 In 1576 the 
same king granted to Kenoch M'Kenze, the son of master Alexander M'Kenze of Kilchrist, for 
his ' sustentatioun at the sculis' for seven years, one of the chaplainries of Apilcroce, vacant by 
the decease of Sir William Stewart. 4 In 1583 he granted to Patrick Dunbar, the son of the 
deceased David Dunbar of Penik, the same chaplainry, vacant by the ' outrunning' of the grant 
to Kenzeoch M'Kainzie. 5 

Saint Euffus island, Loch-an-tagart (the priest's loch), Island-na-nuagh (saints' island), 
Loch-na-nuag (the holy loch), and other names, indicate the former veneration for the asylum 
and territory consecrated by Saint Malrubc. 6 

In 1574 Murquho Jolmnestoun reader at Apilcroce had for his stipend the sum of 17 and 8d. 7 

Between 1561 and 1566 the united value of the chaplainries of Saint Monauis (in Kiltearn) 
and Apilcorce, held by Sir William Stewart vicar of Dingwall, was stated by him at 36 marks. 8 

The district of Applecross was probably included in the lands of the Earl of Eoss in North Argyle, 
which formed part of the sheriffdom of Skey erected in 1292 by King John Balliol. 9 It seems also 
to have been included among the lands of the Earl of Eos between the years 1306 and 1329. 10 

In 1662 John M'Keanzie of Aplecroce was served heir male to his grandfather Alexander 
M'Keanzie of Coull in the lands of Aplecroce, including the towns and lands of Eossollis 
commonly called Over and Nether Eossollis, Eesker, Toskag, Barradaill, Longoll, Keppach, 
Auchmoir, Sacadaill, Drumley, Culmoir, Tercherrie, Drumclaughan, Kirktoun of Aplecroce, 
Killiemorie, Culdnakle, Ardestag, Schildag, Sacrell, Testang, Sadilack, Auchiechock, and 
Culnakle, with the advowson of the church of Aplecroce, in the parish of Aplecroce and 
bishoprick of Eoss, of the extent of 48 marks, with 3s. 4d. in augmentation of the rental. 11 

At Shieldag on Loch Torridou there is a fishing village with a population of 200. 12 

In the district of Applecross are the remains of a subterranean dwelling or place of conceal 
ment, four feet wide and four feet deep, faced with stone, and roofed with flags. 18 

tliis presentation the cliapluiury is said to be founded possibly have been the chapal of Saint Malrube, either 

' in the parish church of Ross in the diocese of the forming part of the old church or detached, 

same.' ' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiii. fol. 10. 4 Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. fol. 100. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxx. fol. 53. 5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 165. 

'" Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 119. Of the build- See Thomson's Map. 7 Book of Assignations, 

ing whose ruins remain beside the church the Old Stat. 8 Book of Assumptions. 

Ace. says ' It was richly endowed with lauded pro- 9 Actn Parl. Scot., vol. i. p. 91. 

perty, which tradition relates to have been conveyed '" Rob. Index, p. 16, no. 7. Reg. Morav., p. 342. 

by the last Popisli missionary (incumbent) in the place, " Ketours. Prom this it appears that the chapel 

known by the designation of the Hed Priest of Apple- lands included nearly all the lands of the parish, 

cross, to his daughter.' This building therefore may 12 New Stat. Ace. Old Stat. Ace. 



GAIRLOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 405 

GAIRLOCH. 
Garloch 1 Gherlocli 2 Gerloch. 3 (Map, No. 5.) 

THIS large parish extends from Loch Torridon on the south to Loch Gruinord on the north, 
having a rocky coast from 80 to 100 miles in length indented by Lochew and the Gairloch, 
from the latter of which it is named. It is divided into two unequal parts by its principal 
lake Loch Maree, which is 18 miles long and studded by twenty-four wooded islands. Its 
highest mountain range, named the Slioch or Sliabhach, is 3000 feet in height. 4 Round the 
coast are a few small islands. 

At the Reformation Sir John Broik appears to have been rector of this church. 5 From that 
period till 1583 it appears to have been vacant. 6 In 1583 King James VI. presented Alexander 
M'Kainzie to the parsonage and vicarage of Garloch, ' vacand in cure Souerane Lordis handis 
contenuallie sen the reformatioun of the religioun within this realme' by the decease of Sir 
John Broik. 7 

The church, built in 1751, stands on the site of an older at the head of the Gairloch. 8 

At the upper end of Loch Maree (anciently Lochewe) at Kinlochew stood a church, apparently 
used as a place of worship till the year 1791 or later. 9 

In an island about the centre of Loch Maree, named Island Maree, there is a cemetery, which 
the inhabitants on the north of the loch continued to use in the end of the last century. 10 In 
the same island are the remains of a cairn or circle of stones, 11 The cemetery, or the chapel 
which it probably contained, locally supposed to have been dedicated to the Virgin Mary, was 
in fact dedicated to Saint Malrube, a circumstance which gradually occasioned the abolition of 
the old name Lochewe, and substituted for it Loch Mulruy, now pronounced Loch Maree. 12 
The carrying of an insane person round the island or cemetery was even till recent times locally 
believed to effect a cure. 13 

On the north side of Loch Maree near the east end is Claod-nam-Sasganach, a spot in 
which some Englishmen, who in the seventeenth century wrought iron mines there, buried 
their dead. 14 

1 A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. A. D. 1583. 9 Macfarlane. MS. Maps. Blaeu. Old Stat. Ace. 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 62. lu Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. 

2 A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlaue'sGeog. Collect. Circa Old Stat. Ace. 

A. D. 1640. Blaen. 12 Macfarlane. Pennant. Old Stat. Ace. New 

3 Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Stat. Ace. 

4 New Stat. Ace. I3 Anderson's Guide. Information procured on the 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 62. spot, 1853. Pennant says that the patient drank of a 

6 Ibid. Book of Assignations. well dedicated to the saint, and was thrice dipped in 

7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 62. the lake the operation being repeated for several 

8 Macfarlane. JUS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. Old weeks. 

Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. " New Stat. Ace. 



406 OEIGINES [GAIRLOCH. 

Gairloch as a part of North Argyle, and the property of the Earl of Boss, was included in 
the sheriffdom of Skey erected in 1292 by King John Balliol. 1 Between 1306 and 1329 it 
was with his other lands confirmed to the Earl by King Eobert Bruce. 2 In 1366 William 
Earl of Koss, Lord of Sky, granted to Paul M'Tyre and to his heirs by Mary of Grahame, with 
remainder to the lawful heirs of Paul, the lands of Gerloch within the parts of Argyle, for 
yearly payment of a penny of silver in name of blench ferme in lieu of every other service 
except the forinsec service of the King when required. 3 In 1372 King Kobert II. confirmed 
the grant.* In 1430 King James I. granted to Nele Nelesoun, for his homage and service in 
the capture of his deceased brother Thomas Nelesoun a rebel, the lands of Gerloch and others 
in the earldoms of Koss and Sutherland and sheriffdom of Innernys. 5 In 1517 John Duke of 
Albany Kegent appointed Colin Earl of Ergile lieutenant of the Isles and other lands, including 
Garloch, for three years or more at the Eegent's pleasure, for the purpose of establishing peace 
among the inhabitants. 6 

In 1528 King James V. granted to John Dingvale, provost of Trinity College Edinburgh, 
the ward of the lands and rents of Garloch in the sheriffdom of Innernys, which belonged to 
the deceased Auchinroy Makenze. 7 In 1547 Queen Mary granted to John Earl of Suthirland 
all the goods belonging to John Hectoursone of Garloch, forfeited by him for assisting the 
English. 8 In 1551 that queen granted to John M'Kenze of Kintaill, and to Kenzeoch M'Kenze 
his son and apparent heir, a remission for the violent taking of John Hectour M'Kenzesone of 
Garlouch, Doull Hectoursone, and John Towach Hectoursone, and for keeping them in prison, 
' vsurpand thairthrow oure Souerane Ladyis autorite.' 9 In 1566 Alexander M'Einzie was served 
heir to his brother german Hector M'Einzie of Garloch in the lands of Garloch, namely, Garloch, 
Kirktoun, Syldage, Hamgildail, Malefage, Innerasfidill, Sandecorran, Cryf, Baddichro, Bein- 
sanderis, Meall, AUawdill, with the pasturage of Glaslettir and Tornagullan, in the earldom of 
Ross, of the old extent of 8. 10 In 1567 Queen Mary granted in heritage to John Banerman 
of Cardenye the ward of the lands and rents belonging to the deceased Hector Makkenych of 
Garloch, with the relief of the same when it should occur, and the marriage of John Eoy 
Makkenych the brother and apparent heir of Hector, and, should he die unmarried, the marriage 
of any other heir or heirs male or female. 11 In 1569 John M'Kcnzie was served heir to his 
brother german Hector in the lands of Garloch as specified in the service of 1566. 12 In 1638 
Kenneth M'Keinzie of Garloch was served heir male to his father Alexander M'Keinzie of 
Garloche in the lands and barony of Garloche, including Kirktoun with the manor-place and 
gardens of the same, Sildag, the two Oyngadellis, Mailfag, Debak, Inneraspedell, Sandcarrane, 
Badeehro, the two Sandis, Erredell, Telledill, Clive, Tollie, the two Nastis ; the lands of Ellenow 

1 Acta Par]. Scot., vol. i. p. 91. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. fol. 102. 

2 Rob. Index, p. 16, no. 7. Reg. Morav., p. 342. 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. viii. fol. 163. 

3 Rob. Index, p. 98, no. 327. Reg. Mag. Sig., p. 92. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 31. 
Coll. de Reb. Alb., p. 62. a Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiv. fol. 75. 

* Rob. Index, p. 98, no. 327; p. 114, no. 10. Reg. 10 Retours. 

Mag. Sig., p. 98. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxvi. fol. 6. 

5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. iii. no. 64. ia Retours. 



LOCHBROOM.] PAROCHIALES. 407 

Auldgressen, with the waters and salmon fishings of Ken-ie and Badechro ; the half of the water 
of Ew and the salmon fishings of the same, Achitcairne, Meoll with the mill, Udroll ; the loch 
of Lochmaroy with the islands of the same, and the manor place and gardens in the island of 
Dinrory ; the loch of Garloch with the fishings of the same ; the forest, pasturage, and ' grossing' 
of Glaslatter and Torranecullane ; together of the old extent of 8 ; with other lands in Ross, 
all united into the barony of Garloche and the town of Olive with the harbour and shore of 
the same, being part of the same barony of Garloch, erected into a burgh of barony, of the 
extent of 3 feuferme. 1 

In 1539 the district of Kinlochew was laid waste by Donald Gorme of Sleat and his allies, 
and in 1541 the latter after the death of Donald Gorme had a remission from King James V. 
for the 'hereschip' of Kinlochew and other crimes. 2 



LOCHBROOM. 

Lochbraon 8 Lochbreyne * Lochbrune 5 Lochbreyin 6 Lochbruyne 7 
Lochbreyn 8 Lochbrein. 9 (Map, No. 6.) 

THIS large district (which of old may have included several parishes) is composed of four smaller 
tracts of country, namely, Coigeach, Lochbroom proper or the Meikle Strath, the Little Strath, 
and the Laigh. 10 It is chiefly mountainous, but has some cultivated valleys near the sea. 11 
Around its rocky coast, about 100 miles in extent, and indented by Loch Enard, Lochbroom, 
Little Lochbroom (the Loch Carlin of Blaeu), and Loch Gruinord, lie the islands Ristal, 
Tanara, Isle Martin, Isle Gruinord, Priest Island, and the Summer Isles. 12 

In the year 1227 Mathew the parson of Lochbraon was present at Kenedor in Moray with the 
other clergy of Ross at the settlement of a dispute between the bishops of Ross and Moray 
regarding the diocesan right of the churches of Kyntalargyn and Ardrosser. 13 The church of 
Lochbrune was a common church of the canons of Ross. 14 In 1569 King James VI. presented 
John Monro Alexandersoun to the vicarage of Lochbreyne, then vacant by the decease of Duncan 
Rannaldsoun. 15 In 1573 he presented Angus Makneill M'Kenze to the vicarage, vacant by the 

1 Retours. 2 See KINTAIL, p. 394. ' A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect 

3 A. D. 1227. Regist. Moraviense, p. 82. In printed 8 Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. 

register Lochbon, but in MS. may be read as in text. 9 A. D. 1681. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. viii. p. 385. 

* A. D. 1569. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 88. Old and New Stat. Ace. 

5 A. D. 1573. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 126. A.D. ' New Stat. Ace. 

1574. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 89. Book of Assig- 2 New Stat Ace. and Maps. Blaeu. 
nations. 3 Regist Moraviense, p. 82. 

6 A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect Circa * Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. foL 89. 

A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 88. 



408 ORIGINES [LOCHBROOM. 

death of John Monro. 1 In 1574 Donald Ferquharsoun was reader at Lochbrune, and in that 
year was presented by King James VI. to the ' haill commoun kirk baith personage and vicarage 
of Lochbrune.' 2 In 1681 the barony of Tarbet, as confirmed by King Charles II. in favour of 
Sir George M'Kenzie of Tarbett and John M'Kenzie his son, included the patronage of the 
parish church of Lochbrein. 3 

The old church stood at the head of Lochbroom, where the present church also was built in 
1817. 4 

In the parish are seven burying-grounds, representing seven churches and chapels (including 
the parish church) that once existed in the district. 5 Of these there appears to have been one at 
Kildonen on Little Lochbroom, dedicated, as its name implies, to Saint Donan. 6 

In 1 574 Donald Ferquharsoun reader at Lochbruue had a stipend of 14, 13s. 4d., probably 
the third of the parsonage and vicarage. 7 

In 1463 John of Yle, Earl of Eoss and Lord of the Isles, granted the lands of Lochbryne and 
others in Eoss, for yearly payment of six pennies blench ferme, to his brother Celestine of the 
Islos, and to his heirs by his wife Finvola the daughter of Lachlan Macgilleone of Dowart, with 
remainder in succession to his heirs by any other wife, and failing these the lands were to revert 
to the Earl. 8 In 1464 King James III. confirmed the grant. 9 After the forfeiture of the Lord 
of the Isles in 1476 the lands were held of the crown by the family of Lochalsch, the descendants 
of Celestine. 10 In 1517 John Duke of Albany, Eegent of Scotland, for the purpose of establish 
ing peace among the inhabitants of the Highlands and Isles, appointed Colin Earl of Ergile 
lieutenant of the Isles and other parts, including Lochbrene, for three years or more according to 
the Eegent's pleasure. 11 In 1539 King James V. granted to Alexander M'Kane M'Alister of 
Glengarre and Margaret Ylis his wife in liferent, and to Angus M'Alister their son and heir 
apparent in heritage, with remainder to Alexander's lawful heirs whomsoever, the half of the 
lands of Lochbrome and other lands in the earldom of Eoss and sheriffdom of Innernys, which 
Margaret Ylis had resigned. 12 In 1543 Thomas Dingwell of Kildone sold the lands of Lochbryne 
with the fishings to John Makkenze of Kintail, in exchange for the lands of Fotherty and for a 
certain sum of money, for yearly payment of six pennies blench ferme to the Queen as Earl of 
Eoss ; and in the same year Queen Mary granted to John Makkenze a crown charter of Loch 
bryne. 13 In 1548 that queen granted to James Grant of Freuchy the liferent of the half davach 
of Aglonoquhan, the half davach of Auchadaskild, the quarter davach of Auchquhedrane, the 
quarter davach of Lachmaline, the quarter davach of Logy, the half davach of Auchnadonill, the 
half davach of Braklewch, the half quarter davach of Derymuk, the quarter davach of Crumnor- 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 126. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vi. no. 116. 

- Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 89. Book of Assigna- 9 Ibid, 

tions. 3 Acta I'arl. Scot, vol. viii. p. 385. 10 Gregory, p. 59. 

4 Macfarlane. MS. Maps. Blaen. Old Stat. Ace. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. fol. 102. 

New Stat. Ace. " R cg Mag Sig ; lib xxy ; no 247. R eg . Sec. Sig., 

Pennant, vol. i. p. 364. New Stat. Ace. vol. xii. fol. 78. 

6 MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. Modern Maps. 13 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxix. un. 93, 205. Reg. Sec. 

" Book of Assignations. Sig., vol. xvii. fol. 93. 



LOCHBBOOM.] PAROCHIALES. 409 

tumergoseill, the quarter davach of Cambusgannich, the quarter davach of Sand, the quarter 
davach of Drumork, the quarter davach of Towrnek and Kernsery, the half davach of Innerew, 
the quarter davach of Auchnaschene, the half oxgang of Auchnaschow, and the half davach of 
Davachlatrik, together of the old extent of 17 marks and 20 pence, of the lands of Lochbrume, of 
which the liferent belonged to Alaster M'Keane M'Alaster of Glengawrie ; and also the heritage 
of the same lands, which belonged to Angus the son and apparent heir of Alaster. 1 In 1554 
Queen Mary granted to John Grant, the son and heir of the deceased James Grant of Eruchquhy, 
the relief of the lands of Lochbrwyne and others in the sheriffdom of Innernes, which belonged 
to him in heritage. 2 In 1574 King James VI. confirmed a charter by John Grant of Freuchie to 
Colin Mackanze of Kintale and Barbara Grant his wife, with remainder to Colin's heirs whom 
soever, alienating to them half of the lands of Lochbroyne, especially those specified in the grant 
of 1548, namely, Auclmaglownachane, Auchadrachskalie, Auchindrewyne, Lochmalyne, Logy, 
Auchtadonill, Braklauch, Derynomwik, Gruinzord and Mungosteill, Camskannycht, Sanda, Drum- 
cork, Turnek and Carnesare, Innerew, Dawachnalitheraucht, Auchnaschene, and Auchanewy, 
extending in all to 17 marklands and 40 pennylands, and to be held of the crown. 3 In 1633 
George M'Kenzie was served heir to his brother Colin Earl of Seaforth, Lord M'Kenzie of 
Kintail, in the lands and barony of Lochalsche, including with other lands those of Lochbrein 
above specified, with the fishings of the same, of the old extent of 23.* 

In 1502 King James IV. commissioned Alexander Earl of Huntlie, Thomas Lord Eraser of 
Lovate, and William Monro of Fowlis, to let the lands of Cogeach, Assent, and all the other 
ferme lands that belonged to Torquell Makloid of Lewes, then in the King's hands by reason of 
Torquell's being the King's rebel, at his horn, and fugitive from the laws, with power ' to gif 
a parte tharof in seal to guide trew men ' for such a time as the Earl should deem expedient for 
the King's honour. 5 In 1508 the same king granted to Odo Makky in Strathnavern, for his 
faithful service in resisting and attacking the King's rebels, the lands of Assent and Ladocchogith 
in the sheriffdom of Innernys, forfeited for treason by Torquell Makcloid formerly of the Lewis, 
with power to sublet. 6 In 1511 (29 June) he granted the same lands and others, with their 
fortalices, houses, waters, fishings, mills, and patronage of churches, all erected into the barony 
and lordship of Lewis, to Malcolm Makclode the son of the deceased Rory Makclode of Lewis." 
In 1538 (2 April) King James V. granted to Bory M'Cloyd, the son and heir of the deceased 
Malcolme M'Cloid of the Lewis, the nonentry and other dues of the barony of Lewis, Wattirnes, 
Assent, and Coidgeach, from the 30th of June 1511 to a year after the date of the grant. 8 In 
1541 the same king granted to Rodoric M'Loid of Lewis and Barbara Stewart his affianced 
spouse the lands and barony of Cogeach, and other lands in the earldom of Ross and sheriffdom 
of Innernes, resigned by Rodoric and erected anew by the King into the free barony of Lewis. 9 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib xxx. no. 314. Reg. Sec. Sig., 6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiv. no. 464. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vol. xxii. fol. 4. vol. iii. fol. 157. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxvii. fol. 22. 7 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xvii. no. 16. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 56. vol. iv. fol. 126. 

1 Retours. 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xi. fol. 66. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ii. fol. 108. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig... vol. xv. fol. 77. 

VOL. II. 3 P 



410 



ORIGINES 



[KINCARDINE. 



In 1572 Rodoric Makcloyd resigned the lands and barony of Cogeauoh, and his other lands, with 
the castles, mills, fishings, and advowson of churches and chapels, which King James VI. then 
granted to his son and apparent heir Torquil M'Cloyd and the male heirs of his body, with 
remainder to Gillecallum Garwe M'Cloyd of Raisay and his male heirs, and to Torquil's male 
heirs whomsoever bearing the M'Cloid surname and arms, reserving the liferent to Rodoric on 
condition that he and Torquil should commit no crime against the King. 1 In 1617 Donald 
M'Kcanzie M ; Ane in Leadmoiris of Assint was served heir to his brother german John M'Keanzie 
M'Donald M'Ane of Dauachnahard in Coegach in a davach of the lands of Auchnahard in the 
barony of Coegach in the sheriffdom of Innernes, including the towns and lands of Davachnahard, 
Auchnahard, Dorny, Badintarbat, Akilvy, Badskalbay, Stracholdyn, Stranagruen, Reiff, and the 
pasture between Lynlovack and Killek, of the old extent of 26s. 8d. 2 In 1655 Sir George 
M'Keinzie of Tarbit Baronet was served heir male to his father Sir George in the lands and 
barony of Cogeach, of the old extent of 4 marks. 3 

There arc a village and harbour established by the British Fishery Society at Ullapool on 
Loch Broom. 4 The village contains about 900 inhabitants. 5 

Tlie parish abounds with remains of those circular buildings known as duns. 6 



KINCARDINE. 

Kyncardyn 7 Kincardin 8 Kincam 9 Kincairdein 10 Kincarne 11 
Kincardine 12 Kincairdync. 13 (Map, No. 7.) 

THIS parish stretches on the north along the whole course of the river Oikel (the boundary 
between Ross and Sutherland) and along its estuary the Dornoch Firth as far as the water of 
Fearn, by which it is bounded on the east. It is mountainous and abounds with small lakes. 14 
Its western part, a hilly district of great extent, is named the Forest of Balnagown or Frevater. 15 
In the year 1227 Maurice the parson of Kyncardyn was present with others of the clergy 
of Ross at Kenedor in Moray at the settlement of a dispute between the bishops of Moray 



1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. fol. 63. 

2 Retours. 
1 Retonrs. 

4 New Stat. Ace. and Maps. Note by Rev. N. 
Macleod. 

1 Note by Rev. N. Macleod. 

" Old and New Stat. Ace. 

7 A. D. 1227. Regist. Moraviense, p. 82. A. D. 1487. 
Acta Dom. Cone., p. 236. 

< A. D. 1533. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 191. A. D. 
1539. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvi. no. 335. A. D. 1501- 
15fl(). Book of Assumptions. A. D. 1560. Reg. Sec. 



Sig., vol. xxxvi. fol. 4. A. D. 1574. Book of Assigna 
tions. A. D. 1587. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol. 89. 
Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. 

9 A. D. 1536. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. no. 380. 
A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. Circa 
A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. 

A. D. 1561-66. Book of Assumptions. 

1 A. D. 1562. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 480. 

2 Circa A. D. 1564. Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 
A. D. 1624. Retours. 

New Stat. Ace. 

Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. Thomson's Map. 



KINCARDINE.] PAROCHIALES. 411 

and Eoss respecting the diocesan right of the churches of Kyntalargyn and Ardrosser. 1 In 1487 
Sir John Buschild was either rector or vicar of Kyneardyn. 2 In 1533 the vicar was Sir Archibald 
Balconie. 3 From 1536 to 1566 Master Thomas Dunnone was rector of Kincardin. 4 In 1566 
Queen Mary presented Master Alexander Leslie for life to the parsonage and vicarage of Kincardin, 
vacant or when vacant by the decease or demission of Master Thomas Dynnvne. 5 The rector of 
Kincardine was a canon of the cathedral, and as such had a manse within the canonry of Eoss. 6 

The church, built in 1799, seems to occupy the site of its predecessors at the mouth of a small 
stream on the Dornoch Firth about a mile east from Invercarron. 7 About the year 1790 the 
church was thatched with heather. 8 At the same date the inhabitants used five cemeteries, two 
in Kincardine, and three in the parish of Creich in Sutherland. 9 

At Kilmachalmag on the Oikel stood a chapel, dedicated, as its name implies, to Saint Calmag. 10 

In the Book of Assumptions the rental of the parsonage and vicarage of Kincardin, as given 
by Mr. Thomas Eos parson of Alnes, was 120 marks or 80, but the rental, he stated, could 
not be made perfect, as the vicarage was unpaid. 11 In the Libellus Taxationum the church is 
valued at 26, 13s. 4d., exactly the third of the above rental. 12 In Baiamund, as preserved by 
Bisset, it is rated at 53s. 4d. 13 In 1574 the reader at Kincardin had as his stipend 13, 6s. 8d. 
and the kirklands. 1 * 

In 1341 William Earl of Eoss granted to Hugh of Eoss his brother the lands of Strath- 
ochill, Strathcarron, and others, with the fishing of Acheferne and Stogok. 15 In 1365 Hugh 
of Eoss lord of Fylorth, the brother of William Earl of Eoss, granted to Paul Mactyre and 
to his wife Mariot of Grahame the niece of Hugh of Eoss, and to their heirs, with remainder 
to Paul's heirs by any other wife, and to his brothers and their lineal descendants, the lands of 
Tutumtarvok, Turnok, Amot, and Langvale, in Strathokel. 16 The same Paul, who is styled 
the grandson of Lendres one of three sons of a king of Denmark, is said to have acquired the 
lands of Stracharron, Strahoykil, and Friewatter. 17 His daughter Catherine married Walter 
Eoss of Balnagoun, who thus seems to have acquired the same lands. 18 In 1430 King James I. 
granted to Nele Nelesoun, for his homage and service in the capture of his deceased brother 
Thomas Nelesoun a rebel, the lands of Daane, Moyzeblary, Croinzueorth, Tittuintarwauch, 
Lanchort, Drinayde, and others in the earldoms of Eoss and Suthirland, some of which appear 
to lie in the parish of Kincardine. 19 In 1490 King James IV., as tutor of his brother James 
Duke of Eoss, granted in heritage to David Eoss, the nephew and apparent heir of John Eoss 
of Balnagown, among other lands those of Stracharroun and Strathochell, with the mills, 

1 Regist. Moraviense, p. 82. 9 Old Stat. Ace. This circumstance and others seem 

2 Acta Dom. Cone., p. 236. to intimate that part of Creich at one time belonged 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 191. to Kincardine, but we have no direct evidence on the 

4 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. no. 380 ; lib. xxvi. no. 335 ; subject. 

lib. xxxi. no. 480. Book of Assumptions. Reg. Sec. 10 Macfarlane. Blaeu. Retours. 



Sig., vol. xxxvi. fol. 4. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxvi. fol. 4. 

s Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol. 89. Retonrs. 

' Macfarlane. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. Old 
Stat Ace. New Stat. Ace. 8 Old Stat. Ace. 



1 Book of Assumptions. 12 MS. in Adv. Lib. 

Rolls of Court, p. 209. 14 Book of Assignations. 

Balnagown Charters. 
Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. " Ibid. 

Ibid. 19 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. iii. no. 64. 



412 ORIGINES [KINCARDINE. 

brewhouses. tenants, and tenandries, resigned by Jolm Ross, and reserving to him the liferent. 1 
In 1515 Sir Donald of the Isles of Lochalch granted to Hector Monro of Foulis his fishing of 
Kelysakkell (the Kyles of Oikel) in the sheriffdom of Innernys. 2 In 1528 King James V. 
granted to William Ros, the brother of the deceased Walter Ros of Ballangowne, the ward, 
relief, and nonentry of the 5 marklands of Ocumyord (or Gruinyord), the 10 marklands of 
Langoill, the 3 marklands of Crokkane, the 7 marklands of Cullace, and the 5 marklands of 
Pellavelnic (probably not all in Kincardine), in the sheriffdom of Innernys, which were in the 
Kinsj's hands by reason of the decease of David Ros of Ballangowne, for the yearly payment of 
20 marks to James Earl of Murray or any other having the ward and relief of the lands. 3 In 
1529 Pope Clement VII. confirmed to the canons of New Feme all their possessions, including 
amon" 1 others two measures of land commonly called davachs in the place called Inncrcharron ; 
the pasture they had in the places called Halchmaguli, Braghlugudi, and Salki ; the fishing 
which they had in the water called Okeal in the place called Banaff; the fishing commonly 
called Clmro in the town of Kyncarden ; a davach in the town called Greater Fern ; a half 
davach in the town called Lesser Fern ; the land they had in the place called Archanagart ; 
the fishing and ferry of the same ; and a davach and a half in the place called Dwne. 4 In 
154G Queen Mary granted to Alexander Ros of Balnagovn and Jonet Sinclair his wife the lands 
of Westir Gronzeart, Eistir Gronzeart, and others in Ross, which Alexander had resigned. 5 
Among the sums of money and victual given out of the bishoprick of Ross yearly at the period 
of the Reformation are mentioned 4 bolls of victual and 40s. to the ' kenar ' of Kincairnc. 6 
About the same period Henry Sinclair bishop of Ross, at the request of Thomas afterwards 
abbot of Fearn, granted to the laird of Balnagown Ardgay amounting to a davach of land, the 
Kirktmvn of Kincardine, the salmon fishing of the same amounting yearly to a last, and the 
mill of Kincardin which yielded yearly 24 bolls victual. 7 At the same time the laird of Bal- 
nagowne held of the abbot of Fearn the lands of Wester Ferine, Innercarroun, Downy, and 
others. 8 In 1578 the lands and barony of Strathokell (partly in Kincardine), and the lands and 
barony of Strathquharrone, the latter including Innerquharron, Seoll, Langwell with the fishing, 
Skenchall, Grumzordie with the fishing, and Auchingullane, in Kincardine, and some lands in 
Eddertoun, which belonged in heritage to Alexander Ros of Balnagowne and George Ros his 
son and apparent heir, and which with other lands were held by them of the bishop of Ros, the 
commendator of Feme, and the sacrist of Thane, were in defect of movable goods apprised in 
favour of James Scrymgeour of Duddop constable of Dimdie, to be held of the crown for the 
services formerly due. 9 In 1582 King James VI. granted to George Ros of Balnagowin and 
to the male heirs of his body, with remainder to his male heirs whomsoever, the lands and 
baronies apprised in 1578 in favour of James Scrymgeour, subsequently apprised by him to 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xii. no. 285. ' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xx. fol. 51. 

- Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. fol. 84. Book of Assumptions. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 140. " Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 

4 Balnagown Charters. One or both of the Ferns may 8 Book of Assumptions, 
possibly lie in the neighbouring parish of Eddertouu. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 67. 



KINCARDINE.] PAEOCHIALES. 413 

Alexander Eos of Balnagowin the father of George, and also resigned by the same James. 1 In 
1584 George Eos apparent of Balnagown sold to Hugh Munro of Asschyn in heritage certain 
lands in Strahokell, and in warrandiee the town and davach of Langwell with the wood of 
Skatwell, with Lonnillodloch, Cromlie, the salmon fishing of the Halfepolmorall, and all the other 
salmon fishings within the bounds of Langwell, in the baronies of Strahokell and Stracharroun, 
in the earldom of Eos and sheriffdom of Innernes. 2 In 1642 Robert Lord Eos of Halkheid and 
Melvill was served heir to Lord William his brother german in the lands of Strathokell, including 
with others Dalnauchtane and Down, the lands of Stracharroun, Soyall, Knockinnarrow, Long- 
wall with the salmon fishings, Scuttiechaell, Gruntzeardis with the salmon fishings, Auchnagullan, 
and Tormichaell, with the Forest of Friewater, and other lands in the earldom of Eoss and 
sheriffdom of Inverness, all united into the barony of Balnagoune, and together of the old extent 
of 200. 3 In the same year Lord Eoss was served heir to his father James Lord Eos of Halk 
heid and Melville in the Kirktoun of Kincardine extending to a quarter davach or 30s., with 6s. 
in augmentation ; the mill of Kincardine extending to 12 bolls victual ; the alehouse of Kin 
cardine with its lands, of the extent of 53s. 4d. and 10s. 8d. in augmentation ; the lands of 
Ardgye, a davach, of the extent of 10 and 40s. in augmentation ; the fishing of the Yair of 
Kincardine, of the extent of 20 ; the lands of Eddertyne, a davach, of the extent of 5, 6s. 8d. 
and 21s. 4d. in augmentation ; the alehouse of Eddertayne, of the extent of 17s. 9d. and 
3s. 6|d. in augmentation ; in all 44, 9s. 5jd. feuferme with other lands united into the 
tenandry of Kirktoun of Kincardine, for the new augmentation of the whole by the sum of 
6s. 8d. 4 In 1657 David Eos of Balnagowin was served heir male to his father David in the 
same lands, baronies, and tenandry, with the following difference in the details the lands of 
Dalvanachtan and Downe, extending to 6 davachs, of which 4 davachs lie benorth the water 
of Oickell in the sheriffdom of Sutherland, and 2 on the south of the same in the sheriffdom of 
Ross, of old the sheriffdom of Innernes ; the lands of Strathcarron, Soyall, Knockinuarrow, and 
Languall, with the salmon fishings ; the lands of Skuittichaill, the lands of Auchownaguillen, 
the lands of Tormichell, and the lands of Esbolg, with the Forest of Friewater, all extending 
to a davach and a half, with other lands in the earldom of Eos and of old in the sheriffdom of 
Innernes, united into the barony of Belnagowne in the sheriffdom of Eoss. 5 

In 1686 King James VII., in a deed confirming the barony of Balnagowan to David Ross 
of Balnagowan, erected the village of Ardgay in Kincarden into a burgh of barony to be called 
the burgh of barony of Bonarness, with two yearly fairs, one on 2 June, and the other on the 
second Tuesday of July, with a weekly market every Friday. 6 

There is a fair called Feille-Edeichan held at Kincardine in the end of November or beginning 
of December. 7 

In 1179 King William the Lion crossed the Ochiel with his army on his way to Caithness. 8 
About the same period he sent a large army into Ros against Gothred Mac William (or Donald 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 11. 5 Retours. 6 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. viii. p. 629. 

' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. fol. 111. 7 New Stat. Ace. 

3 Retours. * Ibid. 8 Ford. Scot., lib. viii. c. 59. 



414 OEIGINES [EDDEBTODX. 

Ban), and soon aftenvards following in person he built or fortified two castles in Ros, laid waste 
the country, and nearly extirpated the followers of Gothred, who, having escaped with a few, 
besieged and destroyed one of the castles when the King's army had retired ; but, on the King's 
return with Prince Alexander, Gothred was betrayed by his followers to the Earl of Buchan, 
and being brought to the King at Kyncardin was put to death. 1 

In the parish arc several ancient round towers known as duns, and several stone circles.-' 

In the churchyard is a sculptured stone sarcophagus, 5 feet long, 2 broad, and 2 deep, and 
divided into two compartments. 3 

Near the church there is a walled lane terminating in a semicircular space, said to have been 
used of old for wapinshawings. 4 

At Craigcaoineadhan in this parish the Marquis of Montrose in 1650 fought his last battle 
and sustained his final defeat. 5 



EDDERTOUN. 

Eddirtane 8 Eddirthane 7 Iddirthane 8 Attlierthane 9 Eddirtayn 10 
-Eddertane 11 Edirdin 12 Edardin. 13 (Map, No. 8.) 

THIS parish, stretching along the Dornoch Firth from the water of Fearn to the Muckle Ferry, 
and about six miles inland, consists chiefly of arable land backed by hills varying from b'OO to 
1000 feet in height. 14 The coast is sandy, except at one rocky point where a hilly ridge abuts 
upon the water's edge. 

In 1532 Sir John Eos the vicar of Eddirtane died in Ballone. 15 The church of Eddirthane 
at the period of the Reformation belonged to the subdean of Ross. 16 In 1583 King James 
VI. presented Donald Simpsoun to the vicarage of Eddertane, vacant by the decease of Master 
William Strauthauchin. 17 

The church, built in 1743, stands apparently on the old site at Ardcronie near Balinlich or 
Ballioch on the Dornoch Firth. 18 

The abbey of Fearn, founded early in the thirteenth century by Ferquhard Earl of Ross 
' beside Kincardin in Stracharrin,' stood at Fearn, prohably Middle Fearn, in this parish, where 

1 Ford. Scot., lib. viii. cc. 28, 76. Chronica de Mail- " A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions, 
ros, pp. 90, 112. Ext. e var. Cron. Scocic, p. 82. "' A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. 

2 Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. " A. D. 1583. Reg. Sec. Sig, vol. xlix. fol. 17'-'. 

* Old and New Stat. Ace. '2 A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 

* Old Stat. Ace. " Circa A. D. 1640. Blaeu. 
5 Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. ' 4 New Stat. Ace. and Maps. 

11 A. D. 1532. Calendar of Fearn. A. D. 1501-1566. !5 Calendar of Fearn. 16 Book of Assumptions. 

Book of Assumptions. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 172. 

' A. D. 1561-1566. Ibid. ls Macfarlanc. Blaeu. Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. 

* A. D. 1561-1566. Ibid. Ace. Modern Maps. 



EDDERTOUN.] PAROCHIALE S. 415 

the convent appears to have remained for about 15 years before its removal to New Fearn, and 
where vestiges of its buildings seem to have been visible till the end of the sixteenth centurv. 1 
Malcolme, one of two ' quhite channonis,' said to have been met by the Earl in Galloway 
bearing relics of Saint Ninian, which with the bearers he carried to Eoss, was abbot for 15 
years, and was succeeded by Malcolme of Nig, during whose rule (apparently about the year 
1238) the site of the monastery was changed. 2 

In the year 1574 the reader at Eddirtayn had for his stipend 20 marks and the kirklands. 3 
In 1341 William Earl of Boss granted to his brother Hugh of Eoss the lands of Westray and 
others, with the fishing of Acheferne and Stogok.* Between 1350 and 1372 Hugh of Eoss 
granted to his armiger William Marescal, for his good and faithful service, his land of Dachynbeg 
in Vestray. 5 Daane, Westray, and perhaps other lands granted by King James I. to Nele Nele- 
soun in 1430, and by King James IV. to David Eos in 1490, appear to lie in this parish. In 
1550 Alexander Eos of Balnagown granted to William Carnecors of Colmishill or Colmislie the 
lands of Milntown of Westray with the mill, the lands of Ballinleich, and the lands of Mekill 
Doles, in special warrandice of the lands of Estir Earechy which he then sold to the same 
William. 7 At the Eeformation all or nearly all the lands in the parish were held and paid tithe 
to the subdean of Eoss as follows Iddirthane, half a davach (or 23 plotighgates), occupied 
by Alexander Eos of Balnagown, 10 marks 6s. 8d. ; Westray and Meltoun, half a davach, 
occupied by the same Alexander, 4 marks ; Eowny (or Downe), a davach, occupied by the 
same, 14 marks ; Mekle Doles and Lechestoun, half a davach, occupied by the same, 10 
marks; Lytill Doles, three quarter davachs, occupied by John M'Colemestoun or Eoss, 10 
marks ; Wastir Farine (now apparently in Kincardine), a davach, occupied by William Eos, 18 
marks ; Estir Feme, a davach, occupied by Thomas Eos, 8 marks ; Dathan Mekle, three fourths 
of a davach, occupied by Walter Eos otherwise named Alexander Waltersoun, his mother, and 
Thomas Eos, 6 marks; Dathan Lytle, a quarter davach, occupied by William Eos and his 
brother, 3 marks ; the subdean's croft and mains within the canonry of Eos, occupied bv 
Andro Wilgues, 3 marks. 8 In 1577 William Carncors of Colmeslie was served heir to his father 
Eobert in the lands of Mylntoun and Westra with the mill, Ballinlechie, and Mekill Doles, in 
warrandice of Eister Earechie. 9 In 1578 the lands of Litill Dolles, Mekle Dolles, the Myln- 
town of Westry, and Litill Dovane, with other lands held in heritage by Alexander Eos of 
Balnagowne, and George Eos his son and apparent heir, of the bishop of Eos, the commendator 
of Feme, and the sacrist of Thane, were apprised in favour of James Scrymgeour of Duddop 
constable of Dundie in defect of movable goods, to be held of the crown for the services 
formerly due. 10 In 1582 King James VI. granted to George Eos of Balnagowin and the male 
heirs of his body, with remainder to his male heirs whomsoever, the same lands with those of 
Ballelich, formerly belonging to James Scrymgeour of Dudop, apprised by him to Alexander 

1 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. New Stat. Ace. 7 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 555. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

2 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. vol. xxiv. fol. 6. 

3 Book of Assignations. 8 Book of Assumptions. Cronicle of the Earlis of 

4 Balnagown Charters. 6 Ibid. Ross. 

6 See KIKCAKDINE, p. 411. 9 Retours. I0 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 67. 



416 ORIGLNES [TAIN. 

Eos the father of George for large sums of money, and resigned by the same James, to be 
held for the services formerly due. 1 

The site of the castle of Eddertoun, erroneously supposed to be one of the two founded or 
fortified by King William in 1179, lies near the sea. 2 

The circular buildings styled duns were at one time numerous in the parish, and one of them 
named Dunaliskag during part of the last century was nearly entire. 3 

West from the church is a large plain with tumuli, where a battle is believed to have been 
fought with the Danes or Norwegians, and beside it a circular mound with a rude obelisk in 
the centre about ten feet high. 4 



TAIN. 

Tene 8 Thane 6 Tayne 7 Tayn. 8 (Map, No. 9.) 

THIS parish (named in Gaelic Sgire-Duich, the parish of Duthace), about 9 miles long from 
cast to west, and two miles in breadth from north to south, consists of three tracts, a low sandy 
plain about 15 feet above the sea (representing the most recent sea-board of geologists), a fertile 
and cultivated plain or terrace about 50 feet above the sea (representing an earlier geological 
beach), and a still higher district culminating in the Hill of Tain 780 feet above the same level. 8 
From the coast there stretcli directly across the Dornoch Firth several large sand banks, the chief 
of which is the Geyzen or Gizzen Brigs, a few miles below Tain, and the extension of the pro 
montory a short way above that town at the Muckle Ferry anciently known as Portincoultyr. 10 
In the year 1227 (during the rule of Robert bishop of Ross) Brydinus the vicar of Tene was 
present with others of the clergy of Ross at Kenedor in Moray at the settlement of a dispute 
between the bishops of Moray and Ross about the churches of Kyntalargyn and Ardrosser. 11 
Saint Duthace, alleged to be the successor of Bishop Robert, born in Tayne, and subse 
quently reverenced there, died in 1249 or 1253, and was buried in the town of Tena (Tain) 
on 19 June in either of these years. 12 Thenceforward there appears to be no notice of 
the church of Tain till the year 1436, in which died Finlaw abbot of Feme, the grandson 
of Sir William Feriar vicar of Tayne. 13 In 1456 Alexander Sutherland of Dunbeath in 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 11. 8 A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. Circa A. T>. 

2 New Stat. Ace. See Chronica de Mailros, p. 90 ; 1G40. MS. Slaps in Adv. Lib. 
Ford. Scot., lib. viii. c. 28 ; and The Family of Kil- 9 New Stat. Ace. 

ravock (Spalding Club), pp. 109, 110. 1 Miller's Scenes and Legends (ed. 1850), pp. 25-28. 

3 Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. 4 Ibid. New Stat. Ace. Anderson's Guide (1834), pp. 505-508. 

5 A. D. 1227. Rcgist. Moraviense, p. 82. Blaeu's Map. 

6 A. D. 1483. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. p. 159. Regist. Moraviense, p. 82. 

* A. P. 1487. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. x. no. 109. A. D. 12 Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, hyem., fol. 66. 

1510. Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, hyeiu. fol. 66. Camerarius, pp. 112, 113,159. Keith's Bishops. Trea- 

Ante A. D. 1615. Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. suror's Accounts. 

Circa, A. D. 1640. Blaen. " Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 



TAIN.] PAROCHIALES. 417 

his will appointed 30 trentals to be said for his soul, of which four were to be said in Tayno 
(doubtless in the church of Saint Duthace). 1 In 1483 William Cluny macer passed to the town 
of Thane in Boss, where the Lord Creichtoun lived in the vicar's house, and in the presence of 
witnesses, among whom were William Johnsoun a bailie of Thane and Thomas Rede a bailie of 
Cromarty, summoned that lord to appear at Edinburgh in parliament to answer for his treason. 2 
In 1487 Master Thomas Eos was rector of the church of Tayne. 8 

In the same year Thomas bishop of Ross, at the instance of King James III., for the weal 
of his soul, and of the souls of his predecessors and successors Kings of Scotland, and of all 
who had contributed any thing towards the foundation, erected the chapel of Saint Duthace 
of Tayne, bishop, confessor, and priest, into a collegiate church for a provost, five canons, two 
deacons or subdeacons, a sacrist with an assistant clerk, and three singing boys. 4 The 
provost was invested with full ordinary jurisdiction over the canons and other officials, their 
familiars and servitors dwelling in the town of Tane, and other persons that might be 
added to the foundation, with power of suspension and excommunication ; with power also 
of excommunication and absolution over the inhabitants of the towns of Newmore, Morynchy, 
Tallirky, Cambuscurry, and Dunskaith, and all who should in any way molest them. The 
five canons or prebendaries were to be regularly qualified priests, trained in morals, litera 
ture, and especially singing, and were bound to be present with the other officials at 
matins, vespers, and other canonical hours and masses, in good surplices made at their own 
expense, and to sing at the mass De corpore &c. every Thursday. Absentees were to be 
punished according to their demerits by pecuniary fines or otherwise as should seem good to 
the provost or the canon whom he appointed to supply the absentee's place. The provost was 
to have for his maintenance the vicarage of Tayne ; and for the fabric of the church and the 
repair of its ornaments and books the teindsheaves of the towns of Tallirky, Morinchy, and 
Cambuscurry, within the girth of Tayne, granted by consent of Master Thomas Ros rector of 
Tayne to the provost, and to be applied at his discretion. To the provost were allotted also 
the escheats of the courts of the town of Tayne. He was to have moreover the town of 
Newmore, recently added to the foundation by King James III., for which he was bound to 
maintain one of the five prebendaries, who should preside in his absence, and celebrate a private 
mass daily for the state (status) of the King, his ancestors, and his successors, and should have 
from the provost for his maintenance ten marks yearly. The presentation to this prebend was 
vested in the King, and the presentation and collation to the provostry in the bishop of Ross. 
The third person was to be the prebendary of Dunskaith, and to have for his maintenance the 
lands and fruits formerly annexed to the chaplainry of Dunskaith, to rule the choir in singing, 
to instruct in singing the boys of the choir, to be presented by the King, and to be admitted 
by the provost. The fourth was the prebendary of Tallirky, who should have for his main 
tenance the lands and fruits formerly annexed to the chaplainry of Tallirky. The fifth was the 



1 Misc. of Bannatyne Club, vol. iii. 3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. x. no. 109. 

3 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. p. 159. * Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. x. no. 109. 

VOL. II. 3 G 



418 ORIGINES [TAIN. 

prebendary of Morynchy with a similar provision for his maintenance. The sixth was the prebendary 
of Cambuscurry, to be maintained from the revenues of that chaplainry. The patronage of the 
latter three chaplainries or prebendaries was vested in the Earl of Eoss, and the admission in 
the provost. The seventh person, a deacon or subdeacon, was to have for his maintenance six 
marks Scots from the lands of Innerathy, to be paid yearly by the lord of the same, who should 
have the presentation, while the admission belonged to the provost. The eighth, a deacon or 
subdeacon, should have for his maintenance yearly six marks Scots, four of which were to be 
paid by Finlay Faid, and two by John Fayd, from their lands of Innerathy and Tayn; the 
patronage to belong to Finlay Fayd and his heirs, and the admission to the provost. The two 
deacons or subdeacons were to be regularly instructed and sufficiently qualified in singing and 
in literature. The ninth, or sacrist, was to have for his maintenance the mill of Morinchy as 
he formerly had, together with such suffrages as clerks usually have, to be trained in singing 
and literature, and to have under him an assistant with a surplice and becoming dress, who 
should ring the bell and supply fire and water in the church ; the patronage to belong to 
the provost. The three singing boys, scholars, or choristers, were to be either secular or 
clerical, and to have for their service yearly each three marks or forty shillings Scots; the 
first to be paid by John Monroo of Foulis and his successors the second by John Merschell 
of Davachcarty and his successors and the third by the heirs of the deceased Andrew 
Alanesoun. The whole of these officials were bound continually to reside in the college, and 
not to be absent above eight days, or even so long without the license of the provost or pre 
sident ; and should they be longer absent even in the courts of the king, the bishop, or the earl, 
they should ipso facto forfeit their respective offices, which, if the regular patron neglected to 
fill them up within a month, should be disposed of by the provost ; and not even an apostolical 
dispensation should have power to release them from continual residence. The visitation and 
correction of the provostry were to belong to the bishop, and the visitation and correction of the 
other functionaries, and full ecclesiastical power over them, to the provost ; so that they were 
not to be sued before any one but the provost, except for crimes which inferred degradation from 
their sacred office. The provost and four of the prebendaries were bound to appear yearly in 
the bishop's synod, one prebendary remaining to celebrate mass in their absence. Each of the 
officials was bound at institution to swear obedience to all the statutes made and to be made, 
and especially to that relating to residence and the invalidity of a dispensation therefrom. 
The rest of the rules were to be similar to those of the collegiate church of Saint John the 
Baptist of Corstorphin. In 1492 the erection was confirmed by Pope Innocent VIII. 1 

In 1514 a mandate of Robert Fresel dean and official of Eoss is witnessed by William of 
Spyne provost of Tane. 2 In 1541 Sir Donald Monro was provost of the church of Tayne. 3 
In the same year King James V. presented George Ogiluy to the provostship, vacant or when 
vacant by the demission or decease of Sir Donald Monro.* In 1542 the same king presented 

1 Original at Tain. 3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvii. no. 159. 

2 Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. * Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiv. fol. 60. 



TAIN.] PAROCHIALES. 419 

Sir Hugh Gray chaplain to the provostry, then vacant by the decease of Sir Magnus Vaus. 1 
In 1544 the provost was Master John Thorntoun precentor of Moray. 2 In 1549 Queen Mary 
presented Sir Nicholas Eos to the provostry of the college church of Thane, and to the vicarage 
of that church annexed to the provostry, when they should be vacant by the demission of Sir 
Alexander Gray. 3 In 1550 and between 1561 and 1566 Sir Nicholas Eos appears as provost. 4 
In 1567 he demitted the provostry of Thane for the abbey of Feme, and John bishop of Ross 
granted it to Thomas Eos parson of Alnes, the presentation being confirmed by Queen Mary. 6 
In 1571 Thomas Ross appears as commendator of Feme and provost of Tayne. 6 In 1584 he 
resigned the abbacy or commend of Feme with the provostry of Tayne, which King James VI. 
then granted for life to Walter Eos, reserving to Thomas the liferent of both with reversion 
to the abbacy in case of Walter's death, and to the ministers serving the parish churches of 
the abbey and provostry the liferent of their stipends. 7 

In 1515 King James V. presented Sir Donald Rede chaplain to the chaplainry called 
Newthmore in the college church of Saint Duthac in Thane, when it should be vacant by the 
resignation of Sir Finlay Fergussoun. 8 In 1518 the same king presented Master Andrew 
Sinclare to the chaplainry of Newmore, then vacant by the decease of Sir Donald Reid. 9 In 
1529 he presented Alexander Grant (or Duff) to the chaplainry of Neomoir (stated in the 
presentation to be situated in the cathedral church of Ross), vacant by the decease of Master 
Andrew Sinclar. 10 In 1530 the same king presented Master John Bissate vicar of Kilmure to 
the same chaplainry (in the college church of Thane), vacant by the decease of the same Master 
Andrew Sinclar. 11 In 1531 he granted to Sir Alexander Duff chaplain, a letter confirming his 
presentation to the chaplainry of Newmoir, vacant by the decease of Master Andrew Sinclare, 
and stating that this chaplainry was situated within the college church of Tayne for suffrages 
and divine service to be performed there, notwithstanding a clause in the presentation to the 
effect that it was situated in the cathedral church of Eoss, where it should have been said the 
college church of Tayne. and that the King therefore admitted the presentation to Sir Alexander 
Duff to be to that chaplainry, and by his letter of confirmation discharged all others from the 
same. 12 In 1541 the same king granted a letter of protection for life to Master John Bissate 
chaplain of the chaplainry of Newmoir within the college kirk of Tane, and to his friends and 
property. 13 In 1543 Master John Bissate, the same prebendary or chaplain of Newmore in the 
college church of Saint Duthac of Thane, with the consent of Queen Mary, of the Earl of Arran, 
and of Eobert bishop of Eoss, granted to George Munro of D'awachcarty the kirklands of the 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xvi. fol. 41. been given in accordance with the original founda- 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xviii. fol. 36. tion. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxii. fol. 91. In the record of 6 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross, 

this presentation it is stated to be in the crown plena 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. i. fol. 90. 

jure, which indicates the alteration of the original 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. fol. 8. 

foundation as given above. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. ff. 120, 121. 

* Reg. Mag. Sig., vol. xxx. fol. 535. Book of As- I0 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. viii. fol. 135; vol. ix. fol. 40. 

sumptions. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. viii. fol. 170. 

' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxvi. fol. 41. Cronicle of the 12 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 40. 

Earlis of Ross. This presentation appears to have 13 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xv. fol. 68. 



420 ORIGINES [TAIX. 

chaplainry, namely, the lands of Newmore with the alehouse, Inchedowne, Baddequhondachy, 
Eowecorracht, and Newmoyr in Strathowre, in the earldom of Eoss and sheriffdom of Innerness, 
which the tenants used to have for the annual ferme of 7 marks Scots, 40s. grassum, 30 bolls 
victual, 4 muttons, 4 dozen poultry, 4 marts, and 12 capons the grantee paying accordingly, 
the victual to be half oatmeal half bear by Leith measure. 1 At the Eeformation the same 
George Munro appears to have been feuar or chaplain of Newmoir. 2 In 1570 King James VI. 
presented Master George Monro student to the chaplainry of Newmoir, vacant by decease of his 
brother german Master Hector Moriro. 3 In 1571, by a deed dated 10 February at Striueling 
and 28 February at the canonry of Eos, Master George Munro prebendary and chaplain of 
Newmoir in the collegiate church of Saint Duthac in Tayne, with the consent of King James 
VI., of the Eegent Mathew Earl of Lennoxe, of Master Kintigern Monypenny dean and vicar 
general of Eos, of Thomas abbot of Feme and provost of the church of Tayne, and of the 
prebendaries of that church, for the augmentation of his rental by the sum of six marks Scots, 
granted to Andrew Munro in Newmoir, the son and apparent heir of George Munro of 
Dauchartye, and to his male heirs, with remainder to his heirs whomsoever bearing the surname 
and arms of Monro, the churchlands of the chaplainry, namely, the lands of Newmoir with the 
alehouse, the lands of Inchedown with the mill and 'straith' of the same, the lands of Baddie- 
quhoncar, Eawsnwye, Killymano, Eewchorrack, Newmoir, with the ' straythis ' of Aldna- 
frankach, Aldnaquhoriloch, and Eewthlasnaboa, in Strathrowrie, in the earldom of Eos and 
sheriffdom of Innernes which were formerly held in heritage by the same George, and were 
resigned by him because from the dearness of the lands he had reaped no profit from them, 
but had sustained loss by the payment of the dues, and because the whole yearly revenue 
of the lands, according to the rental given in for payment of the thirds of the profits of the 
chaplainry, amounted only to the sum of 30 Scots to be held by Andrew Munro for yearly 
payment of 7 marks Scots in name of feuferme, 40s. grassum, 30 bolls victual or 8s. 4s. Scots for 
each boll, 4 muttons or 3s. 4d. for each, 12 capons or 6s., 4 dozen poultry or 12s., together with 
the sum of 4 Scots for arriages, carriages, bondages, and every other burden, and for the 
augmentation of the rental beyond what the lands ever before yielded, amounting in all in 
money to the sum of 30, 14s. 8d. Scots for feuferme and customs. 4 The lands were to be held 
according to the following boundaries. The lands of Intoun of Newmoir, Inchedown, Baddie- 
quhonchar, Eawsnwye, and Kellymoir of Newmoir ; Beginning at the summit of the hill called 
Correyewny towards the west and thence descending the shoulder of the hill across the burn 
which runs from the loch of Auchnaclaych southwards to the little hill called Knokderruthoill 
and thence passing southwards to the marchstone in the cultivated field called Ardachath 
of Newmoir on the west side of a cairn called Glascarne near the road lying on the north 
side of the said cairn which leads westwards to the lands of Badcall and from the said 
marchstone to the marchstones as they are situated as far as the marchstone situated on the 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iviii. ff. 14, 15. 3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 48. 

2 Book of Assumptions. * Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. ff. 69-71. 



TAIN.] PAROCHIALES. 421 

east side of the hill called Knoknasteraa lying on the south side of the wood or haining 
(taluieule) called Abianemoir and from the said marchstone situated on the east side of the 
said hill called Knoknasteraa passing eastwards to the marchstones as they lie as far as the 
marchstone situated at the common road which leads thence to the lands of Inchefure and 
from the said marchstone passing eastwards on the south side of the said road as far as the 
hill called Kirkchaistull or Pollogroyscheak and from the mountain called Kirkchaistull pass 
ing eastwards from hill to hill to the summit of the same as wind and weather schere (vt ventus 
et aer seruiuni) as far as the first hill lying on the south side of the east part of the lands of 
Kellymoir of Newmoir and in like manner passing from that first hill northwards across the 
stream called Alddanaherar to the marchstone called Clachinnumoir and thence passing also 
northwards across the burn called Craskayk to the well called Tobirinteir and thence passing 
northwards to the rock (petra) called Eistir Glakgowir and thence passing straight 1 to 
the summit of the great hill called the Hill of Inchedown and Kandylrwyf to the north 
and passing from the summit of that hill westward as wind and weather schere along the 
summit of the hills to the said hill called Corryzewynie to the west ; which bounds and 
marches lie between the said lands of Intown of Newmoir, Dorrewchoill of Newmoir, Inche 
down, Baddequhonchar, Rewsnwye, Glaslowis, and Kellymoir of Newmoir, and the lands of 
Auchnocloych, Brakach, and Tollye, towards the north respectively. The lands of Rawchar- 
rache, Newmoir in Straythrowrie, Strayth of Aldnafrankache, Aldnaquhorolache, and Rew- 
claschenabaa ; Beginning from the lands of Cabreithe, Dalnaclerauch, and Chanduirwyf, towards 
the east, and the lands of Auchnacloy, Badkall, and Culcarne, on the west the lands of 
Chanderaig, Ardnagaik, Feathilachie, Delany, and Inschefure, towards the south the summit 
of the hill called Binebreychst and the well in the same called Feromenarbinbreichst towards 
the north and descending thence southwards to the fall (preciputium) of the burn called 
Kethanebontaeone and thence descending and passing on the east side of that burn as it 
runs as far as the water called Owarie towards the south and thence passing across the ford 
in that water called Ahanenalawg eastwards to the Reid Braa called Skedane Roy and thence 
eastwards passing a hollow or the How Dayne Claschenagowarane as far as the burn called 
Aldmaddow towards the east and thence passing northwards on the west side of that burn 
to the well in the hill called Correbruoch or Foranecorrebruoch towards the north and thence 
from the said well and the summit of the hill called Correbruoch passing westwards along the 
summit of the hills as wind and weather schere as far as the said hill called Binebreichst to 
the well in the same called Quharanebinebreichst ; which boundaries lie between the said lands of 
Rewchorache, the Strayth of Aldnafrankach, the Strayth of Aldnaquhoroloch, and Claschenabaa, 
with their pendicles and pertinents belonging to the land of Newmoir, and the lands of Tollie, 
Chwleauchmeanach, Chwyulaichmoir, Brakach, and Auchnacloy, towards the west the lands of 
Strathrorie, belonging to Walter Innes in Calrossie, towards the south the lands of Westray 
towards the east and the lands of Stray thcharrone and the burn called Aldcassane towards 

1 In record herialiter; qu. linealiter ? 



422 ORIGINES [TAIN. 

the north. In 1574 Master George Munro, on his promotion to the chancellary of Eoss, 
resigned the chaplainry of Newmore, which King James VI. then granted for seven years to 
George Monro the son of Andro Monro of Newmore ' in suppoirt of his sustentatioun at the 
scoles.' l In 1579 the chaplainry was resigned by Master George Munro, and granted by King 
James to his brother John Munro for the same term and purpose. 2 In 1585 King James 
confirmed the grant of the lands of the chaplainry, made in 1571 by Master George Monro to 
Andrew Monro. 3 In 1586 King James renewed to John Monro the grant of 1579 for the same 
period. 4 In 1639 Robert Monro of Obstaill was served heir to his father Colonel John Monro 
of Obsteill in the churchlands of the same chaplainry, of the extent of 30, 14s. 8d. feuferme. 5 
In 1500 King James IV. presented Sir Alexander Eoss to the chaplainry of Dunskaith within 
the college kirk of Tane, vacant by the promotion, incapacity, or demission of Sir John Poilson 
chanter of Catneiss, last chaplain the patronage belonging to the King and the collation to 
the bishop of Eoss. 6 In 1533 Sir Nicholas Eoss, the natural son of Sir Alexander Eos, was 
chaplain of Dunskeath. 7 Sir Nicholas had four sons, Nicholas, William, Donald, and Thomas, 
who received letters of legitimation from Queen Mary in 1543. 8 In 1544 that queen presented 
Sir Thomas Stevinsoun chaplain to the chaplainry and prebend in the college church of Thane, 

then vacant or when vacant by the decease or demission of Sir Eos. 9 In the same year 

she granted a precept of legitimation in favour of Sir Nicholas Eos the chaplain of Dunskeith. 10 
By a deed dated at the college church of Thayne 24 March 1544 Sir Nicholas, with the consent 
of Queen Mary, of the Earl of Arran, of Eobert bishop of Eoss, and of Master John Thorntoun 
provost and the prebendaries assembled in chapter, granted to Nicholas Eos (his son) and his 
heirs male, with remainder to William Eos the brother german of Nicholas and his heirs male, to 
Donald Eos their brother german and his heirs male, to Thomas Eos their brother german and 
his heirs male, to the eldest of the female heirs of Thomas, and to the heirs of Nicholas whom 
soever, his lands of Dunskaith in the lordship of Ardmanach and sheriffdom of Innernes, together 
with a revenue of two marks Scots from the ferry dues and profits (de naulo et proficuis) of 
the Queen's port and ferry of Cromatye which lands and revenue belonged to him as the 
patrimony of the chaplainry, and extended in his rental to the sum of 18 marks Scots the 
grantee paying yearly 20 marks in augmentation of the rental by two marks, and engaging to 
build and maintain a sufficient mansion upon the lands. 11 In 1549 Queen Mary presented Sir 
Donald Scherare chaplain to the chaplainry of Dunskayth, when it should be vacant by the 
resignation of Sir Nicholas Eos. 12 In 1578 King James VI. granted the chaplainry to Thomas 
Dauidsoun, the son of John Dauidsoun in Edinburgh, for his support at school for seven years. 18 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 45. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xviii. fol. 27. The chaplainry, 

- Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvi. fol. 33. though unnamed, is apparently Dunskaith, and tlie 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. fol. 11. chaplain, whose first name is blank, Sir Nicholas Ros. 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fol. 54. 10 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxix. no. 208. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

5 Retours. vol. xviii. fol. 32. 

6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. i. fol. 126. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xviii. fol. 36. 

7 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. no. 42 ; lib. xxix. no. 208. 12 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxii. fol. 91. 
s Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxix. no. 209. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 47. 



TAIN.] 



PAROCHIALES. 



423 



In 1580 he confirmed a grant in heritage by Andrew Dauidsoun chaplain of Dunskaith, given 
with the consent of the chapter to John Dauidsoun, of the manse and tenement lying in the 
town of Thayne on the north side of the same, between the lands of Thomas Fiddes burgess 
of Thayne on the east, the common road on the west, the public road on the south, and the 
garden of the said Andrew on the north. 1 In 1582 the same king granted to Thomas 
Dauidsoun, the son of John Dauidsoun burgess of Edinburch, the chaplainry of Dunskaith, 
not exceeding the sum of 20 marks yearly, vacant by the decease of Sir Andro Dauidsoun.'-' 
In 1586 he granted to the same Thomas Dauidsoun, 'bursar in the college of Cambrige in 
Ingland,' for seven years, ' and that for supporte to hald and interteny him at the said college 
for his bettir educatioun in vertew and guid lettres,' the chaplainries of Dunskeyth and Ardefaill 
in the diocese of Ross, not exceeding the sum of 30, vacant by expiration of the grant made 
to the said Thomas and his brother James, or in any other way. 3 In 1587 he granted to Robert 
Monro, the son of Hucheoun Monro in Fyreis, for seven years, ' to hald and interteny him at 
the scules,' the same two chaplainries, vacant by the expiration of the grants made to the two 
sons of John Dauidsoun tailor ' throw thair not abyding actuallie at the scules,' or otherwise.* 
In 1503 King James IV. presented Master Alexander Gordoun to the chaplainry of TallSrcy, 
vacant by the decease of Sir Thomas Kilqwhous. 5 In 1505 the chaplainry is stated to have 
been resigned by Master Alexander chanter of Moray, and granted by the same king to Sir 
George Gordoun. 6 In 1506 King James presented Sir Thomas Tarbart to the same chap 
lainry, when it should be vacant by the demission of Sir Alexander Gordoun, then chaplain. 7 
In 1529 King James V. presented Sir Robert Mailuile chaplain to the prebend or prebendary 
chaplainry called Tarlogy in the college church of Thane, when vacant, in exchange for the 
vicarage of Abirtarf. 8 In 1559 Sir Robert Mailuile, perpetual chaplain of Tallarky, granted in 
liferent to George Monro of Dawachcarty, and to Donald Monro his son and his male heirs, 
with remainder to the male heirs of George Monro, and to the eldest of his female heirs without 
division, the lands of Tallarky in the sheriffdom of Innernes, for payment to the chaplain yearly 
of 29 marks 4s. 6d., with two dozen of capons, and 2s. lOd. in augmentation of the rental. 9 
In the same year Queen Mary confirmed the grant. 10 Between 1561 and 1566 Sir Robert 
Melvill was still chaplain, and George Munro feuar of Tarlaquhy. 11 In 1574 King James VI. 
granted for seven years to George Monro, the son of Donald Monro of Talrawky, for his 
education at school, the chaplainry of Talrawky, vacant by the demission of Master George 
Monro, who was promoted to the chancellary of Ross 12 In 1580 the same king granted to 
Donald Monro's son Hucheoun for the same period and purpose the chaplainry of Talrekie, not 
exceeding 20 yearly, and in 1586 he renewed the grant. 13 



1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvi. fol. 139. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlviii. fol. 120. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fol. 53. 
1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol. 32. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ii. fol. 134. 

6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 16. 
' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 79. 



Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. viii. fol. 49. 

9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 460. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vol. xxix. fol. 92. In the Reg. Mag. Sig. the name of 
the chaplain is Sir John Maluile. 

10 Ibid. " Book of Assumptions. 

12 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 45. 

13 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 16 ; voL liv. fol. 54. 



424 ORIGINES [TAIX. 

In 1526 King James V. presented Sir Donald Henrisone to the chaplainry of Morinch in 
the church of Saint Duthac of Thane, when it should be vacant by the resignation of Sir Donald 
Morisone. 1 In 153C the same king presented Sir John Scott to the chaplainry, then vacant by 
the decease of Sir John Moresoun. 2 In 1545 (8 July), and in the same year and month (14 
July), Queen Mary presented Sir Symon Blyith and Sir David Weir successively to the prebend 
of Morinche, vacant by the decease of Sir John Scott. 3 In 1547 she presented Sir Thomas 
Fergusoun chaplain to the same prebend, vacant or when vacant by the demission of Sir Symon 
Blyth. 4 In 1574 King James VI. granted for seven years to Thomas Ros, the lawful son of 
the deceased John Ross or Reid in Annet, for his education, the same chaplainry of Moirinche, 
not exceeding yearly 20 marks Scots, vacant by the decease of Sir Jeromy Paip. 5 In 1580 he 
granted the chaplainry for seven years to Walter Ros the son of Master Thomas Ros in Tane for 
his education at school. 6 In 1584 King James confirmed a grant made by Sir Jerome Pape 
(before or in 1574), with the consent of Nicholas Ros provost of Tayne and commendator of 
Feme, and of the prebendaries of the college, to Donald Ros Hendersoun and his heirs, of 
the following lands (apparently those of the chaplainry of Morinche), namely, the two Thesklaris 
lying on the west side of the town of Tayne, extending to the sowing of three bolls of bear 
or thereby the lands lying above the lands of Enycht, extending to the sowing of six pecks 
of bear two rigs of land extending to the sowing of six pecks of bear one rig of land 
extending to the sowing of one peck of bear, lying at the west end of the town of Tayne 
one rig of land lying near the lands of the provost of Tayne, of the sowing of half a firlot of 
bear one rig of land lying between the roads, of the sowing of a firlot of bear one rig 
of land lying at the west end of the town of Tayne, extending to the sowing of three pecks 
of bear the lands called the Buttis lying on the west side of the provost's lands, extending 
to the sowing of one firlot of bear one rig of land extending to the sowing of three pecks 
of bear one croft of land called Croftmatak, containing seven buttis, extending to the sowing 
of two firlots of bear or thereby one rig of land of the sowing of 3 pecks of bear one butt 
(sulcus) of laud of the sowing of one peck of bear one small butt, and another butt, with four 
rigs of land lying contiguously, extending to the sowing of two firlots of bear one rig of 
land of the sowing of two pecks of bear one rig of land extending to the sowing of two 
firlots of bear or thereby, at least to the sowing of one firlot one rig extending to the sowing of 
one firlot of bear one rig of the sowing of three pecks of bear another rig of the sowing of 
three pecks of bear one rig of the sowing of a firlot of bear one rig of the sowing of two 
pecks of bear one rig of the sowing of two pecks six rigs called Watleyth Croft, of the sowing 
of three firlots of bear one rig of the sowing of three pecks of bear another rig of the same 
sowing two rigs extending to the sowing of six pecks of bear lying contiguously one rig with 
one butt lying upon Poltak one rig of the sowing of three pecks of bear another of the sowing 
of two pecks and also the sowing of a boll of bear at the north end of the town of Tayne ; namely, 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. vi. fol. 53 ; vol. vii. fol. 57. 4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 48. 

J Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. x. fol. 132. 5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 142. 

' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xix. fol. 23. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 12. 



TAIS.] 



PAROCHIALES. 



425 



two rigs extending to the sowing of a firlot ; the Buttis extending to the sowing of three pecks ; 
four rigs in Neclacanalych extending to the sowing of six pecks of bear ; the sowing of three 

pecks of bear at the burn (apud torrentem) ; and one rig of the sowing of two pecks of bear 

all specially bounded as in the charter. 1 In 1586 King James, understanding ' the gude and 
fervent affectioun borne be his Hienes louit Williame Eos, sone to Thomas Eos abbot of Feme, 
towardes science and lettres, and to gif him occasioun to continew at the scuillis for obtening 
thairof,' granted to him for life the chaplainry of Morinche, vacant by the decease of the last 
chaplain, and then held by Walter Eos student the brother of William by the King's grant 
for seven years his entry to take place on expiration of that grant. 2 

In 1506 King James IV. presented Sir Thomas Heriot to the chaplainry of Cambuscurry, 
vacant by the decease or inhability of Sir Donald Rede. 3 In 1515 King James V. presented 
Sir Thomas Fergussoun chaplain to the same chaplainry, when it should be vacant by the 
resignation of the same Sir Donald Eede. 4 In 1544 Queen Mary presented Sir Symon Blyth 
to the same prebend, vacant or when vacant by the decease of Sir Thomas Fergussoun. 5 In 
1547 (2 June) the same queen presented Master John Giffert to the prebend of Cammiscurre, 
vacant by the decease of Sir Thomas Fergussoun, or when it should be vacant otherwise. 6 
In the same year (20 September) she again presented Sir Symon Blyth chaplain to the same 
prebend, then vacant or when vacant by the demission of Sir Thomas Fergussoun. 7 In 1550 
the same queen presented Master Alexander Dingwell to the chaplainry, then stated to be 
vacant by the decease of Sir Thomas Fergusoun. 8 The prebend of Cambuscurry seems to be 
the ' prebendrie of Than perteining to Symond Blyth,' for which he accounted to the collector 
of thirds in 1561-1566. 9 In 1578 King James VI. granted to Eobert Coluill, the son of Master 
John Coluill chanter of Glasgow, for his education during seven years, the chaplainry of 
Cambuscurry, not exceeding 20 marks yearly, vacant by the decease of Master Alexander 
Dingwall. 10 In 1580 Mr. John Coluill demitted the chaplainry, which King James then 
granted for the same time and purpose to Gillicallum Eos the son of Alexander Eos of 
Balnagoune. 11 In 1618 David Eoss of Pitcarline was served heir to his uncle Malcolm Eos 
of Cambuscurrie in the half of Cambuscurrie with the salmon fishings and other privileges, of 
the extent of 7 marks feuferme the half of the alehouse and croft of the same, extent 6s. 8d. 
feuferme and grassum the half of the boat and ferryboat in the harbour of Portinculter, with 
the rights of port belonging to that half, extent 6s. 8d. feuferme and the other arriages and 
carriages of the same lands, extent 2s. 6d. 12 

In 1507 King James IV. presented Sir William Fudes to the sacristy of the church of Saint 
Duthace of Tane, founded on the mill of Morinch, when it should be vacant by the resignation 
of Sir Donald Eede. 13 In 1532 King James V. presented Sir James Wythand to the same 



1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 191. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. fol. 1G2. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 70. 

4 Rg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. fol. 8. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xviii. fol. 107. 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 20. 

VOL. II. 



" Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 48. 

8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiv. fol. 40. 

9 Book of Assumptions. 

10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 97. 

11 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 115. 

12 Retours. u Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 139. 

3H 



426 



OEIGINES 



[TAIN. 



sacristy, when it should be vacant by the resignation of Sir Malcolm Mortimer. 1 In 1539 
(5 June) the same king presented Sir Florimund Hume chaplain to the sacristy, vacant or 
when vacant by the inhability of Sir James Wythhand, or otherwise. 2 In the same year (29 
June) he presented George Ogiluy to the same sacristy, vacant by the inhability of Sir James 
Withhand, who had committed murder. 3 In 1541 (4 October) the same king presented Master 
Hugh Guthrie his servitor, and (5 October) Alexander Vddart, to the same prebend or office 
of sacrist, vacant by the decease of Sir James Withand last possessor. 4 In 1544 Queen Mary 
presented Stephen Kincaid to the office of sacrist in the college church of Thane, then vacant 
by the decease of Sir James Wythand, or when it should be vacant by the inhability or de 
privation of Alexander Vddart, or by any other means. 5 In 1546 the Queen issued a second 
presentation in favour of Stephen Kincaid, and the sacristy was again stated to be vacant by the 
decease of Sir James Wythhand and the deprivation and inhability of Alexander Vdwart, or 
otherwise. 6 In 1557 she presented Robert Kincaid to the same office, then vacant by the 
demission of Stephen Kincaid. 7 At the Reformation the mill of Morinch, on which the sacristy 
of Tain was founded, was held of the bishop of Ross by George Moreis for the yearly payment 
of 2 chalders of victual. 8 In 1618 David Ross of Pitcarlinc was served heir to his uncle 
Malcolm Ros of Cambuscurrie in the grain mill of Morinschie with the mill croft and multures, 
of the extent of 20 marks and 6s. 8d. in augmentation. 9 

Besides the chaplainries originally founded in the collegiate church of Tain by King James III. 
there was a chaplainry subsequently founded by King James IV. In 1495 and subsequently 
the sum of 5 was paid every half year to Sir Donald Rede chaplain, who was appointed to sing 
for the soul of King James III. in Saint Duthois chapel at Tayn. 10 In 1517 King James V. 
presented Sir John Feme chaplain to the chaplainry pensionary of 10 Scots, to be yearly raised 
from the fermes of the earldom of Ross, founded by King James IV. in the college church of 
Tayne, when it should be vacant by the resignation of Sir Donald Rede. 11 In 1543 (26 March) 
Queen Mary presented Sir John Nycholsoun to the same chaplainry, then vacant or when vacant 
by the demission or decease of Sir Hugh Farny. 12 In the same year (2 April) that queen pre 
sented Sir William Home chaplain to the same chaplainry, stated to be vacant by the decease 
of Sir John Farny. 13 

The church, dedicated to Saint Duthace, appears to have stood on the low beach north of 
the town, where its ruins, composed of strongly cemented granite blocks, and now known as the 
chapel of Saint Duthace, may still be seen. 14 The chapel of Saint Duthace stood in the town 
or close to it, and, as above detailed, was in 1487 erected into the collegiate church of Tain, 



Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 151. 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiii. fol. 7. 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiii. fol. 11. 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xv. ff. 42, 46. 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xviii. fol. 27. 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xx. fol. 34. 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxix. fol. 2. 
Book of Assumptions. 



3 Retours. 

Treasurer's Accounts. 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. fol. 117. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xvii. fol. 43. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xvii. fol. 44. 

4 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. x. no. 109. Old Stat. Ace. 
New Stat. Ace. Anderson, p. 305. Miller's Scenes 
and Legends, p. 28. 



TAIX.] PAROCHIALES. 427 

the fabric of which is still standing. 1 This church consists of a chancel, nave, a chapel at the 
south east end of the chancel (a complete ruin), a south porch, a detached tower in the middle of 
the town, and a detached chapel a little south of the former, still nearly perfect. 2 It has a pulpit 
bestowed by James Stewart Earl of Moray, ' the good Regent.' 3 Above a porch at the west 
end of the church is a niche with a stone image of a priest in eucharistic garments ; and in a 
niche on its north side is the effigy of a bishop, supposed to be Saint Duthace.* The present 
parish church, built in 1815, stands at the east end of the town. 9 

About the year 1790 the remains of a small chapel were to be seen in the neighbourhood 
of Lochslin three miles east from Tain. 8 

The shirt of Saint Duthace (camissa Sancti Duthaci) was in the fourteenth century preserved 
and reverenced at Tain, and Saint Duthace's cairn is still shown. 7 

A well, covered by the sea at high water, and of old believed to be a cure for consumption, 
is known as Saint Mary's Well. 8 

In the Libellus Taxationum the provostry of Tayne is valued at 40 ; in the Taxatio 
Sec. xvi. it is rated at 12, 8s., and in Baiamund (perhaps the rating is that of the church of 
Tayne in 1270) at 4. 9 At the Reformation the rental of the provostry was stated by Mr. 
Henrie Kinros as follows ' The said haill provestrie consistit in offrandis and the vicarage of 
Tayne, of the quhilk vicarage the kirk kow and clayth with the pash offrandis ceiss, and only 
restis teind lamb and teind lynt, quhilk will not extend to xx. lib. or thairby.' 10 At the same 
period the other tithes of the parish, then annexed to the subdeanery of Ross, were given as 
follows The town of Tayne, occupied by Nicolas Ros commendator of Feme, Thomas Fiddes, 
Andro Ros and his mother, Nicolas Ros, and Mitchell Furde, paid 104 marks ; Morinchie, a half 
davach, occupied by Nicolas Ros, 12 marks ; Talraquhy, a davach, occupied by Alexander Ros 
laird of Balnagowne, 22 marks ; Cambuscurry, three-fourths of a davach, occupied by Adame 
Hay, 21 marks ; Plaiddes, three-fourths of a davach, by Alexander Innes of Catboll, 8 marks ; 
Pettogarty, half a davach, by the same Alexander, 8 marks ; Ballecherye, a quarter davach, 
by the same, 4 marks ; Innerartie and Balnatouch, half a davach, by Michall Furde, 6 marks ; 
Petgerello, half a davacb, by John Drumond, 8 marks; Balnagaw, half a davach, by Walter 
Innes, 4 marks ; Lochislyne and Newtown, a davach, one half belonging to the bishop, and the 
other to the subdean, 6 marks ; Skardy with the pendicles, occupied by Agnes Ros, 6 marks ; 
Kerskeith, by Andro Ross, 3 marks ; Auley, by Agnes Ros, 2 marks. 11 In 1574 Finlaw Man- 
soun, the minister serving Tayn, Eddirtayn, Nyg, and Tarbert, had for his stipend 66, 13s. 4d., 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. x. no. 109. New Stat. Ace. * Paper by D. Laing, Esq. Neale's Ecclesiological 

2 Ecclesiological Notes on Man, Ross, Sutherland, Notes. 

and Orkney, p. 62. The Treasurer's Accounts mention 6 New Stat. Ace. 

' Sanct Duthois chapell quhair he was borne,' ' Sanct Old Stat. Ace. 

Duthois chapell in the kirkzaird of Tayn,' and ' Sauct " New Stat. Ace. J. Major, lib. v. c. 12. 

Duthois kirk.' The present church, says Mr. Neale in 8 Ibid. 

his ' Ecclesiological Notes,' from the excessive shortness 9 MSS. in Adv. Lib. 

of its nave, though founded for secular priests, could 10 Book of Assumptions. 

never have been parochial. Ibid. For farther notice of Balnagaw (or Ballin- 

3 New Stat. Ace. gall) see RosKEENpos*. 



428 ORIGINES [TAIN. 

the kirklands, and some other perquisites ; and William Fraser, reader at Tayne, had 1G and 
the kirklands. 1 

The rental of the chaplainry of Newmore, as stated at the Reformation by George Munro 
the feuar was as follows ' Newmoir extendis to xii. bollis beir ; item to xii. bollis aitmeill ; 
item to xii. bollis small custumis aitis ; item four mairtis, four muttounis, iiii. do. pultrie ; item 
to xvi. merkis money ; the quhilk rentall was sett to the said George in assedatioun be vmquhill 
Johne Bissatt chaplane thairof, and now be Hectour Monro chaplane for this tyme present, for 
the sowme of xxx. lib. money allanerlie.' 2 

The rental of the chaplainry of Tarlaquhy, held in feu by George Munro of Sir Robert Mclvill 
the chaplain, is stated at the same period at 20. 3 

Sir Simon Blyth at the same era gives in to the collector of thirds the rental of his prebend 
(apparently that of Cambuscurry) as follows ' The rentall of the prebendrie of Than perteining 
to Symond Blyth, quhilk sould pay yeirlie to him iiii. lib., and serve the self, albeit I haif 
gottin na payment thairof this vi. yeiris bygane.' 4 

The girth (immunitas or libertas) of Tayne or of Saint Duthace was nearly coextensive with 
the parish. By an inquest held in 1439, of which a notarial copy is preserved among the burgh 
records, the girth, included between four crosses which marked the four corners called the 
girth crosses, is averred to have been founded by King Malcolm Canmore, and afterwards 
confirmed by King David II. and some of his successors. 5 In 130G or 1307, while King 
Robert Bruce was in the island of Rachryn, his queen and her daughter Marjory left the 
castle of Kildrumy in Aberdecnshire, and took refuge in the girth of Tane. 

The quene, and als dam Marjory 
Hir dochtir that syn worthely 
Was coupillit into Goddis band 
With Walter Steward of Scotland, 
That wald on na wis langar ly 
In castcll of Kildrumy 
To bid ane sege, ar ridin rath 
With knichtis and squyaris bath 
Throu Ros richt to the girth of Tane : 
Bot that travale tha mad in vane, 
For tha of Ros that wald nocht ber 
For tham na blam na yhct danger 
Out of the girth tham all has tane, 
And syn has send tham evirilkane 

1 Book of Assignations. more died in 1093, Saint Duthace about 1253. If the 

- Book of Assumptions. 3 Ibid. girth was founded by Malcolm, in that age it could 

4 Ibid. originally have no reference to the saint whose name 

5 Municipal Corporation Reports. Malcolm Can- it afterwards bore. 



TAIN.] PAROCHIALES. 429 

Richt intill Ingland to the king, 
That gert draw all the men and hing, 
And put the ladyis in presoun, 
Sum into castell, sum in dongeoun. 1 

In the year 1439 Alexander Earl of Ross became bound, in case he should lawfully obtain 
certain lands from Alexander of Suthirland and his wife Maryoun of the Ilys the Earl's sister, 
to grant to them in heritage lands of equal yearly value between the bridge of Alnes and the 
gyrth of Tayne. 2 In 1458 John of lie, Earl of Ross, Lord of the Isles, and sheriff of Innernys, 
addressed to John M'Culloch, bailie of the girth of Sanct Duthowis, a letter requiring him to 
protect the privileges of the burgh of Innernys in that quarter. 3 In 1487, as we have seen, 
the foundation charter of the collegiate church places the towns of Tallirky, Morinchy, and 
Cambuscurry, within the immunity of Tayne. 4 Among the acts of parliament in 1503 occurs 
the following memorandum ' Anent the girtht, that my lord of Ros and the kirkmen 
prouide tharfor as they think to be dovne.' 5 In 1512 King James IV. granted anew to 
William Makculloch of Pladdis the lands of Scardy, Pladdis, Petnely, Pettogarty, Balmoduthy 
(apparently Bailedhuich or Tain), and Ballecarew, with the office of bailie of the immunity 
of Tane, in the earldom of Ross and sherifFdom of Inneruys, which William had resigned, 
reserving to the King the escheats of the bailie courts, for the usual services and the yearly 
payment of 5 marks to a perpetual chaplain in the cathedral church of Ross. 6 In 1533 William 
M'Culloch of Pladis sold to Walter Innes of Towchis two-thirds of Pitnely with the tofts and 
crofts, and the half of Balmathoche with the tofts and crofts, to be held of the granter and 
of the King as Earl of Ross, to the latter of whom were reserved the right of the escheats of 
court, of bludewitis, and of theft. 7 In the same year King James V. granted to Walter Innes 
a crown charter of the lands. 8 In 1535 William M'Culloch sold to William Dunnon a minor 
(puerd), lord of the third part of Arkboll, with remainder to his brother David Dunnon and 
his heirs, to John Dunnon and his heirs, and to Andrew Dunnon and his heirs, the lands of 
Pittogartye lying within the immunity of Saint Duthace of Tain, in the earldom of Ross and 
sherifFdom of Innernys. 9 In 1536 King James V. granted to William Dunnon a crown charter 
of the lands, and to William M'Culloch a letter of reversion to the same. 10 In 1539 the same 
king granted to the same William a letter of reversion to two-thirds of Pitnely and the half of 
Ballethoche, alienated by him in 1533 to Walter Innes of Towchis. 11 In the same year William 
Makculloch sold those lands to William Dunnone of Pittogerte, and King James V. granted to 
the latter a crown charter, and to the former reversion to the lands. 1 -' In 1540 he seems to have 

1 The Brus (Spalding Club), xxviii. 39-56. ~ Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. no. 42. 

2 Cawdor Charters. s Ibid. 

3 Inverness Burgh Charters. 9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. no. 245. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. x. no. 109. See above, p. 417. vol. x. fol. 70. 1(i Ibid. 

5 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. p. 248. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xii. fol. 88. 

6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xviii. no. 82. Reg. Sec. Sig., " Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvi. no. 335. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vol. iv. fol. 197. vol. xiii. fol. 35. 



430 ORIGINES [TAIJT. 

granted another letter of reversion to the same William M'Culloch. 1 In that year he confirmed 
the same lands to William Dunnone of Pittogarte, and in special warrandice of them the lands 
of Plaidis ; the two-thirds of Pitnele and the half of Ballecouth, which formerly belonged to 
the deceased William Makculloche of Plaidis, having been alienated by him under reversion to 
the deceased Walter Innes of Touchis, and now belonging to William Dunnone as assignee of 
William Makculloche, who redeemed the lands from Walter Innes. 2 In the same year King 
James confirmed to Mariot Grant her liferent of the same lands granted to her by William 
Dunnone. 3 In 1541 he granted to Thomas Makculloch, the son and heir of the deceased 
William Makculloch of Pladdis, the nonentry and other dues of Pladdis, Skardy, Bellcairich, and 
the office of bailie of the immunity of Thane, which had been in the King's hands for the last 
two terms. 4 In 1547 William Dunnone of Petnelie granted to Elizabeth Vrquhart, the relict of 
the deceased John Vause of Lochslune, and now his own wife, as compensation for her dowry, 
the liferent of the lands of Petnelie and Pettogarty. 5 In 1548 Queen Mary confirmed the 
grant. 6 In 1550 a charter is witnessed by Robert Makculloch of Pladis. 7 In 1552 the same 
Robert sold to his uncle Alexander Innes of Catboll captain of Orknay, and to Elizabeth Innes 
his wife, the lands and lordship of Plaidis, Pettogarte, Balleguith, Ballekere, Petnele, Scarcle 
with the mill, Torane with the office of bailie of Tayne, and Litill Kintes with the mills and 
other pertinents, lying in the lordship and barony of Plaidis, in the bailiary of Tayne, and 
sheriffdom of Innernes. 8 In the same year Queen Mary granted Alexander Innes and his wife 
a crown charter of the lands. 9 In 15C2 that queen confirmed a charter of William Denwne of 
Petnele, granting, with the consent of his curators Master Thomas Dcnowne rector of Kincarne 
and Alexander Clunes burgess of Cromertie, to Katherine Vans, the daughter of Jasper Yaus of 
Lochslyn, the liferent of the lands of Petnele, then occupied by Master Thomas Denowne and 
John Makculloch. 10 At the Reformation the lands of the parish were occupied as above. 11 
They subsequently passed into various hands, and the office of bailie of Tayne within the four 
girth crosses was held in 1579 by Alexander Innes of Cromy (to whom it was sold with the 
barony of Pladdis by Alexander Innes of Pladdis), in 1617 by Sir William Sinclair of Catbol 
(who in that year was served heir in the same barony to his father Sir George Sinclair of May), 
and in 1681 by Sir George Mackenzie of Tarbett. 12 

Tain, said to be the Norse thing (a place of judgement), and locally styled in Gaelic Balegowich 
or Balduich (the town of Saint Duthace), was formerly asserted to have been created a royal 
burgh by King Malcolm Canmore before the year 1093. 13 By the fictitious grant of that 
king, said to have been confirmed by some of his successors, the inhabitants had power to 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiv. fol. 6. 9 Ibid. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvii. no. 47. Reg. Sec. Sig., 10 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 480. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vol. xiv. fol. 6. vol. xxxi. fol. 48. 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiv. fol. 32. " See p. 427. 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xv. fol. 49. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvi. fol. 48. Retours. Acta 

' Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 254. 6 Ibid. Parl. Scot., vol. viii. p. 385. 

7 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 535. ;3 Worsaae, p. 259. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect Old 

H Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 76. Reg. Sec. Sig., and New Stat. Ace. Inquest among Burgli Charters 
vol. xxiv. fol. 130. cited in Mun. Corp. Reports. 



TAIN.] PAEOCHIALES. 431 

buy and sell within the four corner crosses of the immunity, were exempted from the payment 
of all contributions to the King and the Earl of Ross, excepting the King's custom, and had tin- 
privilege of working (trafficking?) and navigating with their merchandise and goods everywhere. 1 
According to these grants and confirmations, the inquest of 1439, and subsequent deeds, the 
girth or immunity of Saint Duthace seems to be identified with the immunity or liberty of the 
burgh of Tain. 2 The letter dated 1458, already cited, addressed by the Earl of Ross to his 
bailie of the girth of Sanct Duthowis, bears, ' Forthi at is cumyn beto our heryng in maner of 
grewous complaynt be the aldirman, bailyeis, and comunite of Innernys our nychtbouris, that 
sinder of the inhabitandis the toun of Tayn and vtheris of the north partis of thar fredome of 
Innernys occupiis merchandis in buying, sellyng, cappyn, and owthawyng of merchandice and 
gudis langand thar fredome fra thar burgh in grete hindering, scaithe, and lak to thaim, and 
in lessyng of ladding of thar schippis quharfor we stratly charge and commawndis all and 
sinder that sail be requiryt tharapon, and specialy our forsaid bailye, that, quhat person of the 
said burgh of Innernys sail happyn to cum quhar sic gudis is owthad be schippyn or vthirwayis, 
ye help, supple, manteme, and defend that nychtbur of Innernys togidder with the Kingis 
mayr, and that ye thole nocht impediment or let be made to thaim in the vsing of the autorite 
commyttyt to thaim be our Soueren Lord the Kyng for the inhalding of merchandis and gudis, 
hot erar ye assist to thaim as ye will do to vs singlar emplesance and vndir all payn that ye 
may commit and inryn anent our Soueren Lord and vs.' 3 In 1483 the citation of the Lord 
Creichtoun at Thane to answer in parliament for the crime of treason was witnessed among 
others by William Johnsoun a bailie of Thane. 4 In 1494 (3 December) the Lords Auditors 
ordained that letters should be addressed to the bailies of Thane ' to enter Effe Monylaw to 
the possessioun of all landis and tennentis Hand within thar boundis that vmquhile Donald 
Stephin Raithsone burges of Thane deit last westit and sesit as of fee, becaus it is fundin be 
ane inquest takin before the bailyeis of Thane that the said Effe is lauchfull are to the said 
vmquhile Donald;' and the Lords further ordained ' that Cristiane Innecloud sail decist and 
ces of all vexatioun and trubling of hir in the saidis landis in sa fer as pertenis to hir.' 
Cristiane, though frequently summoned to answer in this case, failed to appear. 6 Six days 
therefore after their first decree (9 December 1494) the Lords Auditors ordained ' that for 
ocht that thai haf yit sene Cristiane Innecloid dois wrang in the intrometting and with- 
halding of ane croft of land with ane barne liand within the fredome of the burgh of Tane, 
and tharfore ordinis hir to decist and ces tharfra to be broikit and manurit be Donald Hen- 
drisone ay and quhill he be lauchfully put tharfra.' 7 The Lords further ordained ' that the said 
Cristiane dois wrang in the detentioun and withhaldin fra the said Donald of the avails and 
proffitis of the saidis landis be the space of twa yeris bipast, that is to say, for the first yere xiiiis. 
iiiid., and for the seciind yere four bollis of bere and vi bollis of aitis, takin vp and intromettit 

1 Mun. Corp. Reports. * Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. p. 159. See above, p. 417. 

2 Mun. Corp. Reports. Acta Dom. Aud., pp. 189, 5 Acta Dom. Aud., p. 189. 
192. Retours. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. viii. p. 385. 6 Ibid. 

3 Inverness Burgh Charters. 7 Acta Dom. Aud.. p. 192. 



432 ORIGINES [TAIN. 

with be the said Cristiane, as wes sufficiently preffit before the Lordis,' and that letters should be 
addressed to the bailies of Tane to put their decreet in execution. 1 In 1503 parliament among 
other acts appointed a sheriff to be created and called the sheriff of Ross, and to sit at Thane or 
Dingwall as the case required. 2 In 1505 King James IV. granted to Andro Aytoun, captain 
of the castle of Striueling, the customs of all the burghs and bounds between Banf and Orknay, 
including Tane, for the yearly payment of 50 to the King's comptroller and others. 3 In 1507 
the same king appointed a commission, consisting of Andro bishop of Cathnes, James Redeheuch 
comptroller, Sir John Ramsay and Sir John Striuelin knights, Master John Spens, and Master 
Thomas Leslie, to assemble the communities of Dingwell and Tane, and all the other free 
tenants and inhabitants of the lordships of Dingwell and Ardmannach, and to examine their 
infeftments ; and, should any of them be found to occupy illegally any of the King's lands, such 
as mosses or woods, farther than their infeftments bore, to note them and to send copies of their 
infeftments under the seals of the commissioners to the King, that they might be duly punished. 4 
In 1509 King James appointed Alexander Earl of Huntlie sheriff of Inneruys, with power to 
hold courts and appoint deputies within Ross and other distant parts, and to sit daily in the 
towns of Tane and Dingwall for the bounds of Ross. 5 In 151C died Stephen Fudis burgess 
of Tayne." In 1548 Queen Mary appointed Master Thomas Marjoribanks burgess of Edin 
burgh her custumar within the bounds of Ross, including the burgh of Tane, for seven 
years, for payment of 40 Scots yearly. 7 In 1556 she appointed the sheriff courts of 
Innernes to be held at Tane and Dingwall for the earldom of Ross. 8 In 1587 King James 
VI. confirmed all former grants to the burgh, and granted or confirmed to it the ordinary- 
privileges of a royal burgh. 9 In 1612 the same king again confirmed all former charters, 
and granted 1. The burgh with the lands perambulated yearly within the four corner crosses 
called the girth crosses 2. The lands of Innerrathie, Gorlinges, Clerk-island, and Priest- 
island, belonging to the burgh from time immemorial 3. The harbour and shore adjacent to 
the burgh, with the customs and privileges of a free port, the fishings of salmon and of white 
fish in fresh water and in salt, and also of chouses and rock chouses, mussel-scape, and mussels, 
within the flowing of the sea within sight of the burgh and the boundaries called Duthois Scape, 
with wrack and ware within the bounds of the crosses and both above and below the bounds of the 
adjacent sands. 10 In 1675 King Charles II. confirmed all the former grants made to the burgh. 11 
There are three annual fairs held at Tain, and known as Saint Duthace fairs, at Midsummer, 
Lammas, and Michaelmas. 12 

1 Acta Dom. Aud., p. 192. Reg. Sec. SIR., vol. xix. fol. 28. 

Acta Parl. Scot, vol. ii. pp. 241-249. This seems 8 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 400. 

to indicate an intention to divide the sheriffdom of 3 Mun. Corp. Reports. 

Inverness, which was carried into effect about a cen- 10 Mun. Corp. Keports. Saint Duthace' Scalp, mis- 

tury and a half later. read into Ewchois Scape, is still known by the former 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 30. designation. 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 106. Mun. Corp. Reports. 

5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xv. no. 63. Reg. Sec. Sig.. > 2 New Stat. Ace. The Calendar of Fearn gives 
vol. iii. fol. 204. three fairs at Tane, on 18 March, 9 August, and 20 

6 Calendar of Fearn. December, the last styled ' Makcarmochis day.' 



TARBAT.] 



PAROCHIALES. 



433 



At Inver in the eastern extremity of the parish there is a village with a fishing population. 1 
In 1496, 1497, 1501, 1503, 1504, 1507, and 1513, King James IV. made pilgrimages to the 
shrine of Saint Duthace at Tain (the last having been performed within a month of his death at 
Flodden), and on these occasions he made offerings (usually of the sum of 14 shillings), in ' Sanct 
Duthois chapell quhair he was borne,' in ' Sanct Duthois chapell in the kirkzaird of Tayn,' in 
' Sanct Duthois kirk/ and at ' the stok of Sanct Duthois town,' and generally gave a gratuity 
to the man that bore ' Sanct Duthois bell.' 2 He possessed a ' relict of Sanct Dutho set in 
silver' (of what kind does not appear), which was doubtless preserved as having a miraculous 
power of healing, and which continued in the hands of his son King James V. down at least 
to the year 1534. 3 In 1528, previously to the condemnation of Patrick Hamilton, the bishops 
and clergy tried to persuade King James V. to 'pass in pilgrimage to Sanct Dothess in Rosso,' 
but it is not recorded that he went. 4 In the upper part of the parish of Tain a footpath 
leading across a moor is known as the King's Causeway, and may possibly be the old bridle 
road by which King James IV. ' raid to Sanct Duthowis.' 5 



T A E B A T. 

Arterbert 6 Terbert 7 Tarbat 8 Terbat 9 Tarbet 10 Tarbert 11 
Tarbart 12 Terbart. 18 (Map, No. 10.) 

TILL the year 1628 the parish of Tarbat included the present parish of Fearn, which was 
separated from it ' by the special consent of the bishop and whole diocese,' each parish 
having 10 davachs land. 14 

The old parish of Tarbat thus consisted of two districts Fearn, generally level and arable, 
and Tarbat, a low bare promontory terminating eastward in the point known as Tarbatness, 
probably the Torfnaes of the Norwegian chroniclers. 15 



1 New Stat. Ace. 

2 Paper by D. Laing, Esquire, read to the Society 
of Antiquaries in 1846. Treasurer's Accounts. 

3 Ibid. Pitcairn's Grim. Trials, vol. i. p. 283.* 

4 Paper by D. Laing, Esquire. Knox's History of the 
Reformation, edited by Mr. Laing. 

5 New Stat. Ace. Treasurer's Accounts. In the 
English poem on Flodden field the Scots in the reign 
of King James IV. are reproached with their devotion 
to ' Doffin their demigod of Ross.' Sir David Lyndsay 
in the following reign speaks of 'Sanct Duthow borit 
out of ane block.' Weber's Battle of Flodden Field, 
pp. 27, 154, 155. 

6 A. D. 1227. Regist. Moraviense, p. 82. 

7 A. D. 1529. Balnagown Charters. 

VOL. II. 



8 A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. A. D. 
1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 

9 A. D. 1561-66. Book of Assumptions. Circa 
A. D. 1640. Blaeu. 

10 A. D. 1571. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 101. 

11 A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. A. D. 1586. Reg. 
Sec. Sig., vol. liii. fol. 97. I2 A. D. 1629. Retours. 

13 Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. 

14 Original in the Tower, London. Macfarlane's Geog. 
Collect. This, says the writer in Macfarlane, is shown 
by old desks in the church of Tarbat bearing names 
and arms of proprietors in Fearn who had no lands in 
Tarbat. 

15 New Stat. Ace. Notes by W. H. Murray, Esq. 
Worsaae's Danes, p. 264. 

3i 



434 ORIGINES [TARBAT. 

In the year 1227 Andrew the vicar of Arterbert was present at Kenedor in Moray with others 
of the clergy of Boss on the occasion of the settlement of a dispute between the bishops of Ross 
and Moray about the diocesan right of the churches of Kyntalargyn and Ardrosser. 1 Before 
the year 1529 one of the bishops of Ross granted to the canons of New Feme the vicarage of 
the church of Saint Colman situated in the place called Terbert. 2 The canons had also the 
teindsheaves in the town called Alen in Terbert belonging to the vicarage, four acres of land 
beside the church of Terbert, and an acre of land in the town called Terbert. 3 In 1529 all 
these were with their other possessions confirmed to the canons by Pope Clement VII.* At 
the Reformation the parish church of Tarbat was included in the rental of the bishoprick of Ross 
given up to the collector of thirds, being probably a mensal church of the bishop. 5 In 1586 
King James VI. granted for life to Andro Wod his comptroller a yearly pension of 200 Scots, 
and to John Fentoun the comptroller's clerk a yearly pension of 200 marks Scots, out of 
two-thirds of the bishoprick of Ross, to begin respectively in 1585 and 1588; and assigned 
as payment to the former 10 chalders bear at 20 the chalder, and to the latter 6 chalders 
10 bolls bear, out of the fruits of the parish of Tarbert, being part of the bishoprick. 6 

The church, dedicated, as appears, to Saint Colman the bishop, stood at Tarbat on the 
Dornoch Firth. 7 It was probably rebuilt on the same site about the year 1C28, when the 
parish was divided. 8 Under it till the year 1707 or later there was a vault 30 feet long, 
said to have been built as a church by Saint Columba (Colman ?). 9 A new church was built 
in 1756. 10 

On the coast near the old castle of Tarbat or Ballone there was a chapel known as Teampul 
Eraich, and near it a well named Tobair Mhuir or Mary's Well. 11 

At Portmahomack, styled, says a writer of the seventeenth century, in old charters Portus 
Columbi, but probably meaning the port of Saint Colmac or Calmaig, there is a green hill 
known as Chapelhill or Knockshorty, on which a chapel appears to have stood. 12 

Between 1486 and 1516 Thomas M'Culloch abbot of Fearn built a chapel at Midd Genie, 
which afterwards came to be known as Chapel Barr, being probably dedicated to Saint Barr. 13 

Before the year 1529 Pope Clement VII. confirmed to the canons of Fearn the chapel of Saint 
Mary situated in the place called Cathabul. 14 This is probably the small chapel, the outlines of 
which are still to be seen amid a clump of trees in a field named Baleachan (Hector's town) on 
the farm of Cadboll Mount formerly named Hill of Geanies. 15 

There is a ruined chapel at Hilton on the Moray Firth. 16 



1 Regist. Moraviense, pp. 81, 82. "> Old Stat. Ace. 

2 Balnagown Charters. Old Stat. Ace. 

3 Ibid. Ibid. " New Stat. Ace. Notes by W. H. Murray, Esquire. 
5 Book of Assumptions Old Stat. Ace. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 

c Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. fol. 97. 13 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. Macfarlane's Geog. 

7 Balnagown Charters. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Collect Old. Stat. Ace. 
Blaeu. Macfarlane. Camerarius, pp. 102, 103. u Balnagown Charters. 

8 Macfarlane. Note by W. H. Murray, Esquire. l5 Notes by W. H. Murray, Esquire. 

9 Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 16 Miller's Scenes and Legends, p. 283. 



TARBAT.] PAROCHIALES. 435 

In 1633 Alexander Corbatt of Arkboll was served heir male to his father John Corbat of 
Arkboll in two-thirds of the lands of Arkboll, including Portnawest or the harbour of Saint 
John, with the chapel of Saint John. 1 The chapel stood at Wester Arboll, and was dedicated 
to Saint John the Baptist. 2 

There was also a chapel at Alhansallach, apparently dedicated to Saint Bride. 3 
Early in the thirteenth century (probably about 1227) Ferquhard Earl of Ross founded an 
abbey of Premonstratensian monks at ' Fame beside Kincardin in Stracharrin.'* Whatever 
truth may be in the alleged origin of Feme, the abbey long acknowledged its dependence 
upon the mother house of Whitherne. Malcolm was the first abbot, ruled for fifteen years, 
and after his death 'was holden amongis the peopill as a sanct.' 5 He was succeeded by 
Malcolm of Nig, during whose rule (apparently about the year 1238) Earl Ferquhard removed 
the abbey to the parish of Tarbat, after which it was styled New Feme, latinised Nova 
Farina. 6 Between the years 1252 and 1274 appears Machabeus Makkersin third abbot, 
during whose rule probably between 1261 and 1264 the convent was established and their 
regulations confirmed by Pope Urban IV. 7 Between 1274 and 1323 there appear to have 
been four abbots, Sir Colin, who was abbot in 1281, Mertein and John (canons of Quhyt- 
horne), and Mark Ross the son of Sir Mark Ross, who became abbot in 1321. 8 The last 
three were presented by the prior of Quhythorne. 9 In 1336 the abbey being built only of 
rough stones and clay, and appearing ruinous, William Earl of Ross suggested that it should 
be rebuilt with hewn stone, and seven brethren were appointed to ' beg and thig ' through the 
country for contributions. 10 The rebuilding was begun in 1338 under abbot Mark, who died 
about 1350 and was buried within the abbey church. 11 Abbot Mark Ross was succeeded by 
Donald Pupill, who was elected by the convent, and whose election was confirmed by the prior of 
Quhythorne. 12 In 1356 William Earl of Ross, on the narrative that the abbey of New Feme 
was founded and strengthened with privileges by its founders, as appeared from charters granted 
to it by Alexander King of Scotland, to the effect that it should be free from all royal exactions 
and contributions, confirmed its freedom from the same, with the exception only of that clerical 
tax (clericatura) proclaimed by Ottobon the Pope's legate in Scotland, of which the collectors 
were Roger bishop of Ross and Donald abbot of Feme. 1 Between the years 1350 and 
1372 various charters are witnessed by abbot Donald, and in 1372, while he still ruled, the 
rebuilding of the abbey was finished. 14 In the last named year Earl William, who built 
and repaired the abbey church, is said to have granted to the canons ' the kirk of Tarridie 



1 Retonrs. 8 Regist Moraviense, p. 282. Oonicle of the Earlis 

2 Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 3 Ibid. of Ross. 

4 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. Spotiswood's Re- 9 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross, 

ligious Houses. See EDDERTOUN, p. 415. Ibid. 

6 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. l Ibid. Balnagown Charters. 

6 Balnagovrn Charters. Floors Charters. Cronicle 2 Ibid. 

of the Earlis of Ross. Regist. Moraviense, p. 282. 3 Balnagown Charters. 

Spotiswood's Rel. Houses. * Balnagown Charters. Floors Charters. Cronicle 

7 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. of the Earlis of Ross. 



436 OBIGINES [TARBAT. 

in Koss.' 1 Abbot Donald died in 1383. 2 Adam Monilaw, his successor, was abbot in 1398, 
died in 1407, and appears to have been succeeded by Thomas Kethirnathie, who was appointed 
by the prior of Quhythorne, and after ruling for a short time resigned. 3 The next abbot 
was Finlaw, the nephew of Sir William Feriar vicar of Tayne, who after having ' theikit 
the kirk of Feme' died in 1436. 4 He appears to have been succeeded by Finlay Macfaid, 
who was abbot in 1442. 5 During his rule, by a will dated 1456, Alexander Sutherland of 
Dunbeath bequeathed to the 'chanon' of Feme for a daily mass with a note of the Regina 
6 marks from the lands of Mulfayle and Drumerne, and, failing these, from the lands of 
Dumbeath ; and of 30 trentals to be said for his soul he appointed four to be said in Feyrne. 6 
All his goods not specially disposed of were left at the disposal of abbot Finlay and others. 7 
Finlay Macfaid died in 1485 and was buried within the abbey church. 8 His successor was 
Master John Fearn, who built Saint Michael's aisle on the south side of the church, founded 
the dormitory, built the cloister, and purchased in Flanders for the abbey a tabernacle and lettron 
of brass, the organ, chalices, vestments, and various other ornaments. 9 He appears to have ruled 
about a year, having died in I486. 10 Thomas M'Culloch succeeded to the abbacy in 1486, and 
appears in record in 1487 and 1488. 11 He completed the dormitory, but, being deprived of the 
possessions and revenues of the abbey, except the mill of Fearn and the town of Mid Geny, by 
Andrew Stewart bishop of Caithness, who was appointed abbot on a false representation to the 
Pope, he retired to Mid Geny, where, as before stated, he built a chapel. 12 He died in 1516. 13 
Bishop Stewart, after being actual abbot for a year, died at Skibo in 1517. u ' And after him 
succeeded Master Patrick Hamiltoun, who was accused for heresie be James Beaton archbishop 
of Saint Andrews, primat of Scotland, with the counsell of the haill clergie of Scotland, and was 
decerned to be burnt and delivered in the seculars hands for diverse articles of heresie grounded 
upon Luther's laws . . . upon the whilk articles the said Archbishop gave sentence definitive 
at the metropolitan kirk of Saint Andrews the last day of February 1527 [1528], where the said 
Master Patrick Hamiltoun was burnt in presence of Gavin bishop of Glasgow, George bishop of 
Dunkcld, John bishop of Brechin, William bishop of Dunblane, Patrick prior of Saint Andrews, 
David abbot of Arbrothok, George abbot of Dumfermling, Alexander abbot of Cambuschkynoch, 
Henry abbot of Lindores, John prior of Pittenwemyss, the dean and subdean of Glasgow, Mr. 
Hugh Spence, Thomas Ramsay, and Allan Meldrum.' 15 The successor of Patrick Hamilton was 
Donald Denoon. 16 In 1529 Pope Clement VII. confirmed to the canons of New Feme all their 

1 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. Calendar of " Ibid. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. \. no. 109. Balnago\vn 
Fearn. Charters. 

2 Calendar of Fearn. > 2 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 

3 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 13 Ibid. Calendar of Fearn. 

4 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. '* Ibid. 

6 Ibid. is Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. This list is not 

6 Misc. of Bannatyne Club, vol. iii. complete. For the names of the rest, and for some 

7 Ibid. interesting notices of Patrick Hamilton, see appendix 

8 New Stat. Ace. Tombstone in Abbey. to Laing's edition of Knox's History, vol. iii. 

9 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. "> Ibid. Balnagown Charters. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. 

10 Ibid. xxv. no. 245. 



TARBAT.] PAROCHIALES. 437 

possessions, including the place in which the monastery was situated with its pertinents, the 
vicarage of the church of Saint Colman situated in the place called Terbert which a deceased 
bishop of Ross with the consent of his chapter had given them, the chapel of Saint Mary situated 
in the place called Cathabul, and the teindsheaves in the town called Alen in Terbert belonging 
to the said vicarage four acres of land which they held beside the said church the free 

passage which they held at the small ports of Ardnacolternach, Hardnanen, and Ardnadoler 

the land called Davnaclerach situated near the towns called Cathabul and Gathenn the land 
which they had in the place called Innerladour the use of timber and trees they had in the 
woods of the Earl of Ross, granted of old to the monastery by its founder Ferchard Earl of 
Ross an acre of land they had in the town called Terbert an annual revenue of 8 Ibs. of 
wax they had in the town called Conten two measures of land commonly called davachs 
in the place called Inuercharron the pasture they had in the places called Halchmaguli, 
Braghlugudi, and Salki the fishing they had in the water called Okeal in the place called 
Banaff, and the fishing commonly called Choro in the town of Kyncarden a davach in the 
town called Greater Fern, and a half davach in the town called Lesser Fern the land they 
had in the place called Archanagart, with the fishing and ferry of the same a davach and 
a half in the place called Dwne three davachs in the towns called Rathne and Pitkeri, and the 
lake called Lochlin in the same place a davach in the town called Gathne another davach in 
the same town two davachs in the towns of Rochani and Balmochi a davach in the town 
of Cathbulnacrene and half a davach in the town of Lachelawak. 1 Donald abbot of Feme 
appears in record in 1534, 1535, and 1539 ; and Robert Strabrok a canon of Feme in 1538. 2 
Abbot Donald died in 1541, and was succeeded by Robert Carnecross bishop of Ross, who died 
in 1545. 3 In the latter year Queen Mary granted to her secretary Master David Paniter the 
temporalities of the bishoprick of Ros and the abbacy of Feme, having before presented him to 
the bishoprick and abbacy, vacant by the decease of Robert last bishop and commendator. 4 It 
is said however that bishop Robert was in 1547 succeeded in the abbacy by James Carnecross, 
who in 1550 granted part of the abbey lands to Alexander Ross of Balnagowne, and afterwards 
resigned it in favour of Nicolas Ross provost of Tain. 5 In 1558 the ' dortour ' of Feme was 
burned through the negligence of a boy named Huchon M'Cullo. 8 Between the years 1561 and 
1566 we have the following rental of the abbey given up by Nicolas Ros as commendator of Feme 
to the collector of thirds ' First, the landis contenit in the laird of Ballangownis few chartour, 
Innercarroun, Vestir Ferine, Downy, Westray, Mwldarg, Knokydaff, Myltoun, Balmoch, Midil- 
gany, Pitkery, the Manes of Fearine, Eistir Gany, Wastir Gany, Meikill Rany, Ballieblair, the 
Dow Croft, Brighous, Mylcroft, and Weitland and the fishing of Bonach ; quhilkis giwis in 
maillis, fearmis, girsum, bonage silver, mairtis, muttoun, caponis, henis, and in augmentatioun, 
as his chartour proportis, sic as efter followis Item in maillis, girsum, and bonage silver, and 

1 Balnagown Charters. 3 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. Keith's Bishops. 

2 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. nn. 140, 245 ; lib. xxvi. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xv. fol. 43. 
no. 62 ; lib. xxvii. no. 48. 4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xix. fol. 70. 

5 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 6 Calendar of Fenrn. 



438 ORIGINES [TARBAT. 

augmentatioun, the sowme of 89, 12s. 8^d. f ; Item mairtis, mwttoun, capoun, hen, and fir 
silver, the sowme of 20, 10s. 8d. ; Item victuall, 23 ch. 2 fir. 2 pc. ; Item in aitis, 16 bollis 
and heirof of the said money allocat to the said laird as his chartour proportis in bailyie fie, 40. 
Item the landis of Catboll-fishar, Lawch-clawethe, Tulloch, Lytill Eany, Amot, Eister Feme, 
llelony, sett in few to the Dwnnwnis, quhilkis payis conforme to thair [chartour] as efter 
followis Item in maill, girsum, bonage silver, and augmentatioun, the sowme of 31 ; Item 
mairtis, mwtoun, and capoun silver, 6, 14s. ; Item in victuall, 2 bollis ; Item in aittis, 6 bollis. 
The mylne and vtheris landis quhilkis are not sett in few payis as efter followis Item the 
mylne of Ferne in victual 7 eh. ; Item four ailhouss with their croftis, 4, 6s. 8d. ; Item the 
smithis landis, barne croft, the croft callit Eoresouns croft, the croft callit Ballanasharach, 
vtherwayis callit the Cottaris Delwingis, payis 54s. ; Item the fisharis aucht akeris of land, 
quhilk newer payit ane penny, bot giwin to thaim to dwell vpon for furnishing of fishe to the 
place and cuntrie vpon the cuntries expenss ; Item the place and yeards with the waird for feding 
of hors newer payit ane penny nor cam newer in rentall. Deducit heirof Item to the laird of 
Balnagowne conforme to his chartour as said in bailyie fie, 40 ; Item in contributioun to the 
coledge of iustice, 5 ; Item to the sustentatioun of the channounis, 3 ch. 12 bs. victuall and 
24 money ; Item ane pensioun to John Nicolsoun quhairvnto he is provydit of auld, 24 bs. 
victual.' 1 The whole rental amounted to 165, 7s. O^d. f, 30 ch. 2 fir. 2 pks. victual, and 22 bolls 
of oats. 2 At the same time the abbot of Fearn paid teind to the bishop of Ross to the amount 
of 2 ch. 14 bo. 3 pks. victual. 3 In 1569 Nicolas Ross died and was buried at Fearn in the 
north of the choir.* In 1566, three years before the death of Nicolas, Master Thomas Ross 
parson of Alnes was appointed abbot. 5 He ' theikit the dortour' which had been burned through 
negligence, built a new hall, chambers, cellars, pantry, and kitchen, and made various other 
repairs about the monastery ; he built also two barns of stone, rebuilt the old mill with stone 
and clay, and erected a new mill 'bcwest the place of Fearn.' 6 Subsequently to the year 1568, 
from some disagreement with Alexander Ross of Balnagown, he left Ross and lived for ten years 
at Forres in Moray, where he purchased land and built houses ' on both sides of the road.' 7 In 
1570 King James VI., for the good service done by Alexander Suthirland during the regency 
of James Earl of Murray and subsequently, granted to him for life a yearly pension of 80 
bolls of victual out of two-thirds of the bishoprick of Ross, then vacant by the forfeiture of 
John bishop of Ross for treason and lesemajesty ; and as security he granted to him the 
teind victual of the lands of Eister Gany, Midgany, Westir Gany, Balleblair, and Mekill Gany, 

1 Book of Assumptions. Balnagown Charters. is of the dait 23 April 1600 yeris, and registrat 28 of 

2 Ibid. The above rental is almost verbatim the same November 1GOO, quher Sir Patrik is obleist to dispone 
in the Balnagown papers and in the Book of Assump- tlieis landis in sic formes as they sail think expedient 
tions. In the former there is appended to the rental and that may stand be the law to warrand the samen 
the following memorandum 'Thair is inhibition in both for byganes and tim to cum.' 

the laird of Mayis custodie at the instance of George Ibid. 

Ros of Ballangown and George Sinclar of Mey contra Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. Calendar of Fearn. 

Sir Patrik Morray registrat at Edinburgh penultima Ibid. 

Junii 1G03, fols. 332 and 333, Mr. John Skcne Clerk. Ibid. 

The contract anent the lands of the abbacy of Ferne Ibid. 



TABBAT.] PAROCHIALES. 439 

in the parish of Tarbert, extending yearly to 80 bolls (teinds which arose from the lands 
of the abbacy), 'without preiudice of the said Alexanderis executioun vpoun the reddiest 
vthir fruitis of the said bischoprik in cais he be not thankfullie ansuerit of the saidis fruitis 
assignit.' 1 In 1571 he leased some of the abbey lands to the same Alexander. 2 In the 
same year (10 July) King James VI. granted to Issobell Rois, the relict of the deceased 
Thomas Rois, the escheat of the goods of the deceased Thomas Rois the son of Nicolas Ros 
abbot of Feme, a rebel and at the horn for not paying to Andro Monro, the chamberlain of the 
bishoprick of Rois, certain teinds of the lands of Eister Gany and Tarrall in the parish of Tarbet 
for the years 1569 and 1570 ; and (2 December) he granted the same to Alexander Suthirland. 3 
In 1574 the same king confirmed a grant in heritage, made to Alexander Feme by the deceased 
Nicolas commendator of Ferae, of the conventual lands of Cullyne with the alehouse and croft 
then occupied by Donald Makconachie, lying between the ditches of the monastery commonly 
called the ward dykis towards the north and the lands of Eister Rarecheis as the march stones 
and the fauld dyk extend towards the south, the meadows of the lands of Eister Rarecheis 
towards the west and the common road descending to Tulloch towards the east also of a 
croft of land called the smyihis croft lying between the public road on the west and the lands 
of Kilpot on the north, and the lands and crofts of Ballechyricht on the south and east and 
of the crofts of the monastery and the ' meringis ' of Ballechericht formerly called Waltir 
Makroreis crofts, lying between the said smith's croft and the public road on the west, Tobur- 
nayngor, Graystane, the pasture and the moss of Feme on the east, the lands of Eister Kilpot 
and Rynmoir on the north, and the common pasture of the monastery adjacent and extending 
to the lands of Catbollfischear and Tulloch on the south all within the abbacy of Feme and 
sheriffdom of Innernes.* In 1584 King James VI. granted to Walter Ros for life the abbacy 
or commend of Feme with the provostry of Tayne, resigned by Thomas commendator of the 
same, reserving to Thomas the liferent with reversion to the abbacy in the case of Walter's death 
occurring before his, and to the ministers serving the parish churches of the abbey and provostry 
the liferent of their stipends. 5 In 1587 the same king confirmed three grants made by Thomas 
Ros commendator of Feme one to Donald Ros in Littil Rany and his heirs of the lands then 
in his hands lying between the lands of Lytill and Mekill Allanis towards the west, the lands 
of Arthreis, Coillen, and Ballesuith on the south, the feu-ferme lands (terras feudifirmas) of the 
monastery of Feme belonging to the laird of Ballingown on the east, and the lands of Ballinblair, 
Brigend, Mylncroft, Doweatcroft, and Weitlandis, on the north, with the four alehouses and 
brewlands of the monastery lying near it and occupied by John M'Allane, John Reid, John 
Murray, and Andrew Dowglas, the kill commonly called the kill of Feme, the gardens occupied 
by Andrew Dowglas, David Reid, and John Murray, and the mill of Feme with the astricted 
and other usual multures another to Donald Ros Hucheinsoun in Ballemakie and his heirs 
of the lands of Ballemakie extending to a davach, resigned by Alexander Ros of Balnagowne 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 37. 4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 83. 

2 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. fol. 90. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 101 ; vol. xl. fol. 31. 



440 OKIGINES [TABBAT. 

formerly fcufermar of the same and a third to John Ros of Litill Allane and the heirs male 
of his body, with remainder to his heirs male whomsoever, of the lands of Muldearge and 
Knokandow, resigned by George Ros of Balnagowne all lying within the abbacy of Feme 
and sheriffdom of Innernes. 1 Abbot Thomas Ross died at Tain in 1596, and was buried at 
Fearn in Saint Michael's aisle. 2 In 1606 James Gordoune of Letterfurie was served heir to his 
father Patrick Gordoune of Letterfurie in the manor of Feme, of old called the monastery of 
Feme, the demesne lands and lands of Feme, the lands and towns of Eister and Wester Feme, 
the mill of Feme, the lands of Innercarrone, the lands of Downe Westra, the lands of Muldarge, 
Ukades, Miltoune, Ballemochie, Midganie, Pitkerie, Easterganie, Wasterganie, Mikillrane, Balblair, 
Dowcroft, Brighouse, Mylcroft, Veitland and the fishing of Bronache, Catboll-fischer, Lachclawy, 
Tullichc, Littilrane, Arnote, Ryland, the four alehouses of Fearne, the lands called Smythisland, 
Hartecroft (or Bartyscroft), the croft called Robesoun's (Roresoun's ?) croft, the croft called 
Baildnaseaucht (or Balleneserache) or the Cotteris Dcillings, and eight acres of land occupied 
by the fishers of Feme, with the mill, all formerly belonging to the abbacy of Feme as part of 
its patrimony, and of the extent of 337, 13s. 3 In 1615 David Ros of Balnagowne was served 
heir to his father George in the lands of Wester Feme, Downie and fishings of Bonack, Ruylome, 
Meikill Rayny, Pitkerie, Muldarg, Torrendow, the half of Wester Ganie, Cullin, Ballinsirach, 
the croft of Ballinsirrach, Easter Drum and Feme, four acres of Catbollfischer, the limekiln of 
Feme, the mill of Feme, the demesne lands of Wester Drum and Feme, with the dues and 
feufermes of the same, and half of the manor, buildings, and gardens of Feme, of old named 
the monastery of Feme, in the barony of Gaynes and sheriffdom of Innernes, of the extent of 
222, 11s. 2d. of old ferme and augmentation^ 4 In 1617 King Jaines VI. annexed the abbacy 
to the bishoprick of Ross in favour of Bishop Patrick, and in 1633 King Charles I. renewed or 
confirmed the annexation in favour of Bishop John. 5 At an earlier period of the same century 
the abbacy came to be known as the barony of Ganyes (now Geanies) ; and in 1643 Sir James 
Sinclair of Cannesbyc Baronet was served heir male to his grandfather George Sinclair of May 
in half the manor of Feme of old called the monastery of Feme, the lands and towns of Eister 
Ganny and Mid Ganye, and the alehouse and croft of the same, the lands of Bellamuthie and 
Ballavaiche, the lands of Cadboll-fischer and Tulloche, the lands of Lachclaveig, Sallachie, and 
Muckirnach, with the alehouse and alehouse crofts, half the lands of Cotteris Delvingis and 
eight acres of old occupied by the fishers of Feme, the lands of Litle Mylntoun of Feme, the 
lands of Litle Ranny, the lauds of Belblaire with the alehouse and its croft, the lands of Dow- 
croft, Brighouse with alehouse and croft, Milcroft, Wcitland, Almet, Innercharrone, with alehouse 
and croft, and Eister Feme, all in the barony of Ganyes and sheriffdom of Innernes, and united 
into the barony of Cadboll, of the extent of 170, 6s. lOf d. feuferme. 6 

The Calendar of Fearn gives us the following obits of persons connected with the abbey, 
or buried within it In 1512 Alexander Ros of Balnagown, who was buried in Feme ; in 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. ff. 64, 68, 201. Ibid. 

Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. Calendar of Fearn. 5 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. p. 71. 

3 Retours. 6 Hetours. 



TARBAT.] PAROCHIALES. 441 

1519 Sir Donald M'Gillemeil canon ; in 1525 John Monelaws canon ; in 1543 Sir William 
Caldour canon ; in 1548 Sir John M'Culloch canon, and Patrick Davidson chaplain of the altar 
of the Virgin Mary ; in 1549 James Reid, who built the well in the cloister, and died at Feme ; 
in 1552 Donald Faid canon and subprior ; in 1554 George Baxter faber lignarius; in 1557 
Robert Strabrok canon, mentioned above in 1538 ; in 1564 Andrew Dauson monk ; in 1588 
Dean David Reid canon ; in 1592 David Clepen citizen of Leyth, who died at Feme in the 
house of Alexander Feme at Balnasyrach, and was buried at Tane ; and in 1596 Alexander 
Feme, who died at Balnaclune and was buried in Feme. 

The abbey church consisted of a choir with two chapels, and a nave, on the north of which 
the conventual buildings appear to have stood. 1 The choir, still standing, and measuring 99 feet 
by 25^, was used as the parish church from 1628 when the parish of Fearn was erected till 
1742, when the roof fell in while the people were assembled for worship, and killed 36 persons. 2 
It appears to have been disused till 1772, when it was repaired and again used as the parish 
church. 3 Within it there is a stone effigy of a warrior shown as that of Ferquhard Earl of Ross.* 
In Saint Michael's aisle is the effigy of abbot Finlay M'Fead, with the inscription, Hie jacet 
Finlaius M'Fead abbas de Fern qui obiit anno mcccclxxxv. 5 

In the rental of the bishoprick of Ross, as given up to the collector of thirds by Bishop Henry 
Sinclair between the years 1561 and 1564, the teinds of the parish church of Tarbat are stated 
at 33J chalders victual, 26, 8s. teind silver, and 40 muttons. 6 Among the ' sowmes of money 
and victuall giwen out of the bishoprick of Ros in ordinar now yeirlie' the bishop includes as 
given to the curates of Nyg and Terbat 40, and to the preacher of the kirks of Nyg and 
Terbat 50. 7 In 1574 Gawin Dunbar reader at Tarbert had for his stipend 20 marks and the 
kirklands. 8 

Among the sums given out of the bishoprick yearly at the era of the Reformation the bishop 
includes also 12 bolls of victual to the chaplain of Allan*-, probably the same as Alhansallach 
before mentioned. 9 

In the Taxatio Sec. XVI. the monastery of Feme is rated at 82, 13s. Id., and in the Libellus 
Taxationum it is valued at 400 marks. 10 

In the year 1281 William Earl of Ros, as the compensation exacted of him and his by 
Archebald bishop of Moray for injuries done to the churches of Petyn and Brachuli, granted 
to the bishop the two davachs of land in Ros which were called Kattepoll, and a quarter 
(quarterium) of land which was called Petkenny, for the maintenance of the Friars Minorites 
who should for any time dwell at Elgyn in their house near the cathedral church ; so that 
the bishop with the advice of his chapter should appoint some discreet and faithful person 
as distributor, to receive yearly the whole ferme of the said lands, and to distribute it as 

1 Neale's Ecclesiological Notes, p. 59. 6 Book of Assumptions. 

3 Old Stat. Ace. Miller's Scenes and Legends, p. 208. 7 Ibid. 

In the latter authority see a curious tradition connected 8 Book of Assignations. 

with the above catastrophe. 9 Book of Assumptions. See above, p, 435. 

3 Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. 5 Ibid. 1 MS. in Adv. Lib. 

VOL. II. 3 K. 



442 OKIGINES [TABBAT. 

he should see fit for the maintenance and necessary uses of the said friars ; but, should the 
friars not be in the place or refuse to remain there, the ferme of the lands was to be wholly 
converted at the discretion of the bishop and chapter to the maintenance of two chaplains 
who should minister continually in the cathedral church of Elgyn for the souls of all the 
faithful dead ; and the Earl bound himself and his heirs, if they should ever contravene the 
arrangement, to submit to the jurisdiction of the bishop, or, in case of the vacancy of the see, 
of the dean and chapter, who should compel them by the censures of the church to observe it. 1 
In 1375 William of Clyn, claiming to be tenant of the town of Cathboll belonging to the bishop 
of Moray, appeared in presence of witnesses at the town of Nyg in Ross, and requested of 
Master William of Chesholme treasurer of Moray and John of Forbes lord of that Ilk, the 
procurators of Alexander bishop of Moray, that the lands and his corns of the said town, 
arrested by those procurators for the fermes of the town both past and present, should be given 
him to pledge (ad plegium) promising on his oath, which he of his own accord gave by the 
hands of the said treasurer, that he would settle with the bishop about the said town and fermes 
against the feast of Saint Andrew the apostle next instant, or, if he could not come to an 
agreement within that time, that he would not thenceforth intromit with the town, or raise any 
controversy with the bishop or his church regarding it, or publicly or privately offer any 
obstruction to them or to those to whom they might lease the town ; on which Master William 
of Chesholme, with the consent of his comprocurator, forthwith restored to William of Clyn to 
pledge a certain glove in lieu of the lands of the town and of his corns, and suspended all 
inhibition before made by the procurators till the feast of Saint Andrew the apostle immediately 
following. 2 In 1478 William bishop of Moray, with the consent of his chapter and of Gilbert 
Richardson and John Williamson the chaplains of Catbollis, for the promotion of divine wor 
ship and the augmentation of the salary of the chaplains, leased to John M'Culloch and three 
successive heirs either lineal or collateral the lands of Catpolle lying in the earldom of Ross and 
sherift'dom of Innernis, which the deceased William Earl of Ross granted for the maintenance of 
two chaplains in the church of Moray, for payment of 14 marks Scots yearly in the cathedral 
church of Ross at the usual terms, and making one suit either in person or by deputy at the 
bishop's head court to be held yearly at Elgyn after Easter. 3 In subsequent records occur the 
names Catboll or Cadboll, Wester Catboll, Catboll-abbot, and Catboll-fisher, applying probably 
to only two towns or properties, Cadboll perhaps being the lands granted to the bishop of Moray, 
and the other three being but different designations of a Cadboll belonging to the abbot of 
Fearn. In 1552 appears in record Alexander Innes of Catboll captain of Orknay, to whom the 
lands of Plaidis and others were sold by his nephew Robert M'Culloch, perhaps the descendant 
of John M'Culloch to whom the chaplains' lands of Cadboll were granted in 1478. 4 

In 1534 there appears in record Andrew Dunnune of Wester Catboll. 5 In 1536 John 
Denowne of Dauidstoun grants a charter at Catboll (in this instance apparently Wester Catboll) 

1 Regist. Moraviense, pp. 281, 282. Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 76. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

2 Ibid., pp. 180, 181. vol. xxiv. fol. 130. 

3 Ibid., pp. 232, 233. ' Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. no. 140. 



TAKBAT.J PAROCHIALES. 443 

to Dowy Makculloch (of the Plaidis family) and her heirs by his own son Donald Denowne. 1 
In 1562 Andrew Denowne of Wester Catbole again appears in record, and about the same 
period, as we have seen, the lands of Catboll-fisher were among those leased to the Dwnnwnis 
by the abbot of Fearn. 2 In 1606 John Denone was served heir to his father Andrew Denone 
of Catboll-abbot in the lands of Catboll-abbot, Tulloch, half of Sallochie, half of Lachclawak, 
and half of Muikarniche, in the earldom of Ross, of the extent of 14, 7s. (a part of those held of 
the abbot of Fearn by the Dwnnwnis of the previous century). 3 In 1643, as we have seen, the 
same lands, including those of Cadboll-fischer, were part of the barony of Ganyes or Cadboll 
held by Sir James Sinclair of Cannesbye.* In 1649 Andrew Denune was served heir to his 
father John Denune of Catboll in nearly the same lands, including Catboll-abbat, and of 
the same extent, 14, 7s., in the subdeanery and sherift'dom of Ross. 5 In 1666 Master John 
M'Keinzie was served heir male to his father Master Thomas M'Keinzie of Inverlawell in 
various lands, including those of Wester Catboll or Fisher, of the extent of 9 feuferme. 6 

In 1351 Hugh of Ross, the son of the deceased Hugh Earl of Ross, confirmed to William of 
Marischal and Mariot his wife 6 marks of valued rent of Tarbart, granted to them by his father 
Hugh and brother William Earls of Ross. 7 In 1368 Mariot of Hirdmannystoun, the daughter of 
the deceased Andrew of Hirdmannystoun, and widow of William Mariscall, quitclaimed to the 
same Hugh of Ross the same 6 marks of yearly revenue of Tarbart, which were then confirmed to 
him by his brother Earl William. 8 In 1374 or 1375 King Robert II. confirmed to Hew of Ross 
the same 6 marks or 4. 9 In 1375 there appears in record Sir Walter of Tarbard (whether 
clerical or lay is not apparent). 10 In 1476 King James III. granted to Elizabeth Countess of 
Ross, the wife of John Lord of the Isles, for her maintenance certain lands in the earldom of 
Ross and sheriffdom of Innernes, including 5 marklands of Tarwat; and in 1477 on attaining 
his majority he confirmed the grant. 11 In 1485 (25 January) the Lords of Council ordained that 
James of Dunbar should pay to Elisabeth Countess of Ross the sum of 100 marks of the mails of 
her lands of Ross (including, as afterwards appears, those of Easter Tarbart) due at the term of 
Whitsunday last. 13 They further ordained that the consideration of a claim made by the Countess 
against James of Dunbar for 13 chalders of victual and 100 marks received on her behalf from 
the Earl of Huntle should be deferred till the 24th of March, and that the Earl should be 
summoned to appear for his interest. 13 An action raised by the same James against the Coun 
tess for payment of 40 of fee which he alleged remained due by her for five years, and for 
fulfilment of a condition under which he alleged that he held her lands, namely, that the dues 
should be diminished when the lands were waste, the Lords deferred till the same 24th of March. 14 
In 1489 (21 January) the Lords Auditors ordained that James of Dunbar of Cumnok should pay 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxi. fol. 393. s Balnagown Charters. 

2 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 480. See above, p. 438. 9 Rob. Index, p. 120, no. 64 ; p. 129, no. 32. 

3 Retours. 10 Regist. Moraviense, p. 181. 

4 Ibid. See above, p. 440. " Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. no. 371 ; lib. viii. no. 40. 
s Ibid. a Acta Dom. Cone., p. 100 

Ibid. 13 Ibid. 

7 Balnagown Charters. " Ibid. 



444 ORIGINES [TAHBAT. 

to Elizabeth Countess of Ross the sum of 736 marks Scots due by him for the mails of the lands 
of Eos which he held of her in lease, as proved by a bond under his seal and subscription ; that 
his lease should be declared null because he had failed in payment of the dues at the terms 
contained in his bond ; and that his lands and goods should be distrained for payment. 1 James 
of Dunbar, though regularly summoned in the case, failed to appear. 2 He seems however still 
to have held the lands, as in the following year (25 February 1490) the Lords of Council 
ordained him to pay to the Countess 200 marks Scots as the dues of the lands for Martinmas 
preceding, as shewn by his bond. 3 In the same year King James IV., as tutor of his brother 
James Duke of Eoss, granted to David Eoss, the nephew and apparent heir of John Boss of 
Balnafown, a yearly revenue of 6 marks from the lands of Tarbat, with certain lands in Eoss, 
resigned by John Ross and reserving to him the liferent. 4 In the same year he appears to have 
granted to him the lands of Tarbat. 5 In 1494 (9 December) the Countess of Eoss brought 
another action against James of Dunbar for wrongfully withholding from her 42, ' with the mare 
of the Witsonday tonne' of her lands of Eos, and four score head of oxen and cows, and for 
wrongfully occupying her lands of Dolguy (Delgny ?) and Estir Tarbart with the rest of her 
lands of Eos ; in which case the Lords Auditors in presence of the parties ordained that James 
of Dunbar did wrong, that he should cease to occupy the lands, that he should give to the 
Countess the dues and cattle in question in so far as she could prove her case before William 
Monroo of Fowlis, that the latter should be empowered to hear the case, and, if it was proved, 
to distrain accordingly, and that the lands should forthwith be 'red' to the Countess. 6 In 
1506 King James IV. commissioned Andro bishop of Caithnes to let all the lands in the 
lordships of Eoss and Ardmannach which formerly belonged to Elisabeth Countess of Eoss, ex 
cept the lands of Tarbat, for the term of five years to the tenants by whom they were formerly 
held or to others. 7 In 1507 the same king granted his lands of Tarbart in Eoss, with power to 
sublet, to Master Gawine Dunbar archdeacon of Saint Andrews. 8 In 1514 James Dunbar of 
Tarbart appears in record. 9 In 1516 King James V. granted to James Dunbar, the son of 
David Dunbar of Durris, the King's lands of Tarbart in the earldom of Eoss, then occupied by 
him, for nine years from the following Whitsunday, with power to sublet. 10 In 1526 the same 
king granted in forme to James Dunbar of Tulyglennis his lands of Estir Tarbert with the 
fishings in fresh and salt water. 11 In 1531, 1538, 1540, and 1542 James Dunbar of Terbart or 
of Tullyglennis appears in record. 12 In 1542 King James V. confirmed to James Dunbar of 
of Tuliglennis and Elizabeth Leslie his wife, and to their heirs male, with remainder to James's 
own heirs male, to his uncle Eobert Duubar and his heirs male, and to his own heirs whomsoever, 

1 Acta Auditorum, p. 122. 2 Ibid. > Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. fol. 60. 

3 Acta Dom. Cone., p. 126. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 34. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

4 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xii. no. 285. vol. vi. fol. 45 ; vol. vii. fol. 46. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. 
3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xii. no. 228. pp. 310, 311. 

6 Acta Aud., pp. 192, 193. 12 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxiv. no. 65; lib. xxvi. no. 63; 

7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 108. lib. xxvii. no. 130 ; lib. xxviii. nn. 255, 263, 285. Reg. 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 157. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 11; vol. xi. fol. 63; vol. xiv. fol. 
"> Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 170. 36 ; vol. xvi. ff. 6, 36. 



TARBAT.] PAROCHIALES. 445 

the lands of Estir Terbert with the fishings, they paying yearly to the King 11, 19s. 8d. with 
one reek hen or 4 pence, in order to augment the rental by the sum of 9s., and to the chap 
lain of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Balnagoune 4 for his daily prayers for the King and his 
successors. 1 The same James Dunbar of Terbat appears in record in 1543, 1545, 1546, 1554, 
1555, and 1556. 2 In 1558 Queen Mary granted to James Dunbar, the son and apparent heir 
of James Dunbar of Eister Terbart, the lands of Eister Terbart with their salt and fresh water 
fishings, resigned by his father, to whom the liferent was reserved, the grantee paying as in 
1542. 3 Between the years 1561 and 1566 the bishop of Boss states the yearly rent of the mills 
of Tarbat and Kincardin, held by the laird of Balnagowne and Walter Innes of Terbat, at 20 
bolls of victual ; and among the sums given yearly out of the bishoprick includes 18 bolls of 
victual and 10 paid to the ' gantar' men of Nyg and Terbat. 4 In 1578 the quarter lands 
of Tarbet, with other lands belonging to Alexander Bos of Balnagowne and George Eos his 
son and apparent heir, and held by them of the bishop of Ros and others, were apprised in 
favour of James Scrymgeour of Duddop constable of Dundie. 5 In 1569 James Dunbar of 
Tarbet appears in record. 6 In 1601 Alexander Dumbar of Tarbert was served heir to his father 
James Dumbar of Tarbert in the lands and mill of Eister Tarbert and the fishings in salt and 
fresh water, of the old extent of 3. 7 In 1604 Master James Dunbar of Sanquhar, then of 
Tarbert, appears as heir male and of entail to Alexander Dunbar of Tarbert his brother. 8 

By a deed dated at the abbey of New Fearn in 1357 William Earl of Ross, the son and heir 
of the deceased Hugh Earl of Ross, granted the land of Estir Alane to Hugh of Ross his 
brother. 9 The grant by King James III. to the Countess of Ross in 1476, confirmed by him in 
1477, included 20 marklands of Mekle Alane and 10 marklands of Litill Allane. 10 In 1490 
King James IV. granted the lands of Litill Allane, resigned by John Ross of Balnagovn, to 
David Ross his nephew and apparent heir, reserving the liferent to the former. 11 In 1547 there 
occurs in record the legitimation of Alexander Ros of Litill Allan, the son of the deceased Walter 
Ros the apparent heir of Sir David Ros of Ballegown. 12 The lands of the mairdom of Allane 
belonged at the Reformation either wholly or partly to the bishop of Ross, who includes them 
in his rental given up between 1561 and 1566 to the collector of thirds. 13 In 1569 King James 
VI. granted in heritage to Andrew Monro of Newmoir the escheat of all the goods upon the 
quarter lands of Mekill Allane, with the crops of that year, which were forfeited by John bishop 
of Ross for treason and lesemajesty. 14 In 1579 George Ros the son and apparent heir of 
Alexander Ros of Balnagowne, fear, and his father liferenter, for certain sums of money titulo 



1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 255. Reg. Sec. Sig., 6 Reg. Sec. Sig. vol. xxxviii. fol. 72. 

vol. xvi. fol. 6. 7 Retours. s Ibid. 

2 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxix. nn. 206, 419; lib. xxx. 9 Balnagown Charters. 

no. 306 ; lib. xxxi. nn. 54, 281. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xix. 10 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. no. 371 ; lib. viii. no. 40. 

fol. 75 ; vol. xx. fol. 53 ; vol. xxiv. fol. 119. See above, p. 443. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 506. Reg. Sec. Sig., Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xii. no. 285. 
vol. xxix. fol. 37. 12 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xx. fol. 92. 

4 Book of Assumptions. 13 Book of Assumptions. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 67. See pp. 412, 415. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 95, 



446 



ORIGINS S 



[TAKBAT. 



oneroio, sold to Alexander Ros of Litill Tarrell and Elizabeth Ros his wife, and to Alexander's 
heirs whomsoever, certain lands in Ross, and a yearly revenue from the lands of Vmass Litill 
Allane, which were held in heritage by Alexander of Litill Tarrell ; and King James VI., of 
whom the lands were to be held, granted to the latter a crown charter of the same. 1 In 1 582 
that king granted in heritage to Master John Ros of Hiltoun the ward and other dues of half of 
the town and lands of Litill Allen and others in the earldom of Ros, in the King's hands since 
the decease of Alexander Ros of Lytill Terrell, with the relief when it should happen, and the 
marriage of Marione Ros and the other two lawful daughters and heirs apparent of Alexander 
Ros. 2 In 1586 he granted in heritage to his domestic servant William Keith for his good service 
the lands of Meikill Allane with the alehouse, and others in Ross, the grantee paying yearly 
for Mekill Allane 53s. 4d., 3 chalders bear, 3 chalders oatmeal, 10 reek hens, and 16s. of 
bondage silver, with the usual services, for the alehouse 13s. 4d., and as gressum every five 
years 13s. 4d. 3 In 1596 Marjory and Isobcl Ross were served heirs portioners to their father 
Alexander Ross of Litill Tarrell hi a third (apparently a third each) of the lands granted in 
1579, including the third of a yearly revenue of 8 marks 3 shillings from the lands of Umaist 
Littill Allan. 4 In 1623 George Monro of Mylntoun was served heir to his father George 
Monro of Tarrell in a fourth of the lands and town of Meikill Allane or Allanemoir, containing 
two oxgangs, of the extent of 13s. 4d., and a fourth of the alehouse, of the extent of 3s. 4d. s 
In 1666 Master John M'Keinzie was served heir male to his father Master Thomas Mackeinzie 
of Inverlawell in the quarter davach of Litle Allan called Balnagone, with the half of the 
wards of Wester Litle Allan, and the half of the Cordincrlands, in the parish of Fearne, of the 
old extent of 2, 5s. 6 

About the year 1368 John of Tarrell appears in record. 7 In 1534, 1535, 1538, and 1539, 
appears in record Angus M'Culloch of Terrell or Mekle Terrell, and in 1538 Alexander his 
son and apparent heir. 8 In 1542 King James V. granted to John Macculloch, the nephew 
and heir apparent of Angus Macculloch of Terrell, with remainder to Hugh and Angus the 
sons of Angus Macculloch, the lands of Mekill Terrell in the earldom of Ross and sheriffdom 
of Innernes, which Angus had resigned, reserving the liferent to him and the terce to his 
wife. 9 In 1544 Queen Mary granted to Hutcheon M'Culloch of Hiltown the marriage of John 
M'Culloch, the nephew and heir of the deceased Angus M'Culloch of Terrell, in the Queen's 
hands by reason that Angus held his lands of Terrell of her as Earl of Ros; and, if John 
M'Culloch should die unmarried, the marriage of any other heir. 10 In 1553 the same queen 
confirmed to Cristina Monypenny, the sister of Thomas Monypenny of Kingkell, the lands of 
Mekill Terrell, granted in that year in fulfilment of a marriage contract by John Makculloch 
of Tarrell to Cristina in liferent, with remainder to his heirs by her, and to his own heirs 



Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 124. 

Reg. Sec- Sig., vol. xlix. no. 7. 

Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. 

Retours. 

Ibid. 

Ibid. 



7 Balnagown Charters. 

8 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. nn. 140, 245; lib. xxvi. 
nn. 62, 335. 

9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xv. no. 92. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vol. xxviii. fol. 70. 

10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xviii. fol. 31. 



TARBAT.] PAEOCHIALES. 447 

whomsoever. 1 In 1559 the queen granted to John M'Culloch the right of reversion to the lands 
of Mekle Terrell, stated in the grant to have been alienated under reversion to Thomas Mony- 
penny of Kinkell. 2 In 1562 a charter of John Dunnvne lord of the third part of Arkboll is 
witnessed by John the son of William M'Culloch of Mekill Terrall, and by Alexander Gar 
in Mekill Tarrall. 3 In 1567 (6 May) Queen Mary granted in heritage to Master David Chalmer 
the ward and other dues of the lands of Mekill Terrell, and of the other lands and property of 
the deceased John M'Culloch of Terrell, in the Queen's hands by his decease in April last, or 
by reason of his holding the same of her by ward or relief, or by decease of her late husband 
Henrie Duke of Albany and Earl of Ross, the immediate superior of the lands, together with 
the marriage of Angus Makculloch the son and apparent heir of John, or of any other heir. 4 
In 1568 King James VI. granted in heritage to Andrew Monro of Newmore the escheat of 
the grant to Master David Chalmer, who was denounced rebel and at horn for not finding 
surety to appear and answer for the slaughter of James Balvany in Prestoun and other persons 
slain at the field of Langsyid. 5 In 1571 he confirmed the grant to Andrew Monro. 6 In 1577 
Mariot M'Cullo was served heir to her father John M'Cullo of Mekill Tarrell in the lands 
of Mekill Tarrell, together with the revenue of 50s. from Eister Ard above mentioned, of the 
old extent of 4 marks. 7 In 1578 King James VI. granted to Mariot M'Culloch, and to her 
future spouse George Monro the son and apparent heir of Andrew Monro of Newmoir the 
lands of Mekill Tarrell, which formerly belonged to Mariot in heritage, and which she had 
resigned with the consent of her curators Robert Monro of Fowlis, James Dunbar of Tarbert, 
George Dunbar of Awauch, and Master George Monro chancellor of Ros to be held of the 
crown for the services formerly due. 8 In 1579 King James VI. granted to Elizabeth Ros, 
the widow of Angus Makculloch of Mekill Tarrell the grandfather of John Makculloch of Mekill 
Tarrell, and then the wife of Alexander Ros of Litill Allan, a crown charter of the half of the 
third part of the lands of Mekle Tarrell called Royeindavoir (or Rover, Davoir), Renmasrysche, 
Creitnacloyithegeill, Creitemantae, Kilpottis, Rownakarne, Rownaknoksenidis, a piece of the 
land of Callechuinetulle, and the sowing of a boll of bear in the field called Kandig, lying 
contiguously between John Makcullach's lands of Kilstane towards the north, the lower part 
of the lands of Mekill Tarrell on the west, the public road leading from the road of Mekle 
Tarrell to the sea on the east, and the rocks (petras marinas) towards the south sold to her 
in liferent by John Makculloch as full satisfaction for her terce of the lands of Mekill Tarrell 
or of others that might fall to her by the decease of the said Angus her husband reserving 
to the crown all the rights and services due from the said half third before the present con 
firmation. 9 In 1598 George Munro of Mekle Tarrell appears in record. 10 In 1627 John 
M'Kenzie of Tarbat was served heir male to his father Sir Rotheric M'Kenzie of Coegache in 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 124. Reg. Sec. Sig., * Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 76. 
vol. xxv. fol. 94. 7 Retours. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxix. fol. 69. 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 68. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. no. 597. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 63. 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxvi. ff. 45, 46. 10 History of Family of Kilravock (Spalding Club), 
b Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 12. p. 287. 



448 ORIGINES [TARBAT. 

the lands of Eister Aird, Eister Tarbat with the fishings, Mekill Tarrell, and an annual revenue 
of 50s. from the lands of Eister Aird, all united into the barony of Mekill Tarrell. 1 

In 1562 there appear in record Alexander Boss of Litill Terrell and Elizabeth Ross his wife. 2 
Alexander is said to have died in 15G8. 3 It is certain that he was succeeded by Alexander Eos 
his son, and that the father was dead before the year 1579, and the son before 1584. 4 In 1596 
Marjory and Isobell Eoss were served heirs portioners to their father Alexander Boss of Litill 
Tarrell in the third part of the lands of Litill Tarrell, of the extent of 22s. 4d. feuferme. 5 In 
1617 Hugh Eos was served heir in certain lands to his father John Eos of Lytel Tarrell. 6 

In 1463 John of Yle, Earl of Eoss and Lord of the Isles, granted to Thomas the younger of 
Dingvale, with remainder in succession to his brother John of Dingvale and his heirs, and to the 
better and more worthy successor of his relatives of the name of Dinguale, the lands of Vsuy in 
the earldom of Eoss and sheriffdom of Innernys, with certain reservations, in exchange for the 
third part of Arkboll and the lands of Inchfure in the mairdom (maragium) of Delny, for pay 
ment of 6 pennies in the name of blenchferme. 7 In 1464 the grant was confirmed by King 
James III. 8 In 1506 King James IV. granted to John bishop of Eoss two-thirds of the town of 
Arkboll in the earldom of Eoss and sheriffdom of Innernes, resigned by Thomas Dingwell of 
Kildon. 9 In 1507 he granted to Alexander Fresell the same lands of Arboll, formerly resigned 
by Thomas Dingwell, and granted to the bishop of Eoss, through whose decease in bastardy 
the lands were escheat to the crown. 10 In 1514 John Frisale, the son and heir of Alexander 
Frisale burgess of Liiilithgw, sold the two-thirds of Arboll to James Dunbar of Tarbart, to 
whom King James V. then granted a crown charter of the lands. 11 In 1531 James Dunbar 
sold the two-thirds of Argbole to William Dunnvne, with remainder to his brothers John and 
Andrew ; and in the same year King James V. granted to William Dunnvne a crown charter of 
the lands, and to James Dunbar a letter of reversion to the same. 12 In 1534 James Dunbar of 
Tarbart sold one-third of the lands of Arboll to John Corbet of Estir Ard and Mariot Dunbar his 
wife, who in the same year received a crown charter of the land from King James V. 13 In 1535 
and 1536 William Dunnon is styled a minor (puer) and lord of the third part of Arkboll. 1 * In 
1544 John Corbett portioner of Arboll granted to James Corbett his son and heir apparent 
the half of the two-thirds of the lands of Arboll, with the half of the two-thirds of the mill, 
reserving the lifercnt to himself and a reasonable terce to his wife Catherine Eorisoun ; and the 
grant was confirmed by Queen Mary. 15 In 1546 James Dunbar of Terbert sold to Eobert Vaus 
burgess of Innernes his lands of the third part of Arkboll, lying between the third part of the 
same belonging to John Corbet one of the portioners of Arkboll towards the east and the other 

1 Retours. 9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiv. no. 263. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

* Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. no. 597. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 81. 

vol. xxxi. fol. 79. o Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 122. 

3 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. ' Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 170. 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 72 ; vol. xlv. fol. 2 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxiv. no. 65. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

118; vol. 1. fol. 111. vol. ix. fol. 11. 

5 Retours. 3 R cg jj ag gj g-j jjj, xxv no 173 

6 Ibid. i Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. no. 245. 
' Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vi. no. 17. 8 Ibid. > Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xviii. fol. 33. 



TARBAT.] PAROCHIALES. 449 

third part belonging to John Denowne the remaining portioner towards the west, together with 
the third part of the mill of Arkboll ; and Queen Mary granted a crown charter to Robert 
Vaus, with reversion to James Dunbar. 1 In 1547 the same queen granted to William Dennowne 
of Petnele the nonentry and other dues of Ardboll and other lands, which were in her hands 
since the decease of Alexander Dunnvne of Dauidstoun. 2 In the same year she granted to John 
Dunnvne, the second son of John Dunnvne of Dauidstoun, the western third part of the lands of 
Arkboll, reserving the liferent to John Dunnvne the elder who had resigned the lands. 3 In 
1554 the same queen granted to Elizabeth Dunbar the liferent of the lands of Mydthrid of 
Arboll, with the third part of the mill and fishings, resigned by her husband Jaspar Waus. 4 
In 1556 she granted to John Denone and his wife Katherine Ross the third part of the town 
and lands of Arboll which John had resigned. 5 In 1562 John Dunnvne, styled lord of the 
third part of Arkboll, in fulfilment of a contract made at Litill Terrell in that year, and with 
the consent of his wife Katherine Ross, sold the third part of the town and lands of Arkboll to 
Alexander Ross of Litill Terrell and his wife Elizabeth Ross, to whom in 1563 Queen Mary 
granted a crown charter of the lands. 6 In 1569 King James VI. granted to Alexander Ros of 
Litill Tarrell and Isabella (Elisabeth ?) Ros his wife and their heirs a crown charter of a half of 
the third part of Arkboll alienated to them by James Dunbar of Tarbet, to whom at the same 
time the King granted the power of reversion to the lands. 7 In 1579 he granted to John Waus 
of Lochslyne and his heirs the third part of the town and lands of Arkboill with the third part 
of the mill, alienated to him by the deceased Alexander Ros of Litill Tarrell. 8 In 1582 the 
same king granted to Master John Ros of Hiltoun in heritage the ward and other dues of the 
third of Arboll and Escboll, and other lands in Ros, which were in the hands of the crown since 
the decease of Alexander Ros of Lytill Terrell, or other lawful possessor, with the relief when it 
should happen, and the marriage of Marione Ros and the other two lawful daughters and apparent 
heirs of Alexander Ros. 9 In 1584 he granted to Margaret Mwnro the daughter of Hugh Mwnro 
of Asschin a crown charter of the liferent of the west third part of the town and lands of 
Arkboll, sold by the deceased Alexander Ros of Lytill Terrell to Margaret and the deceased 
Alexander Ros his son, to whom she was at the time betrothed, and to her heirs by him, with 
remainder to Alexander's heirs whomsoever ; and also the ward and nonentry of the same third 
part. 10 In 1596 Marjory and Isobel Ross were served heirs portioners to their father Alexander 
Ross of Litill Tarrell in the third of the west third of the lands of Arboll, of the old extent of 
9s. 6|d. 11 In 1601 Alexander Dumbar of Tarbert was served heir to his father James Dunibar 
of Tarbert in a third of the lands and mill of Arbo in the sheriffdom of Innernes, of the old 
extent of 7s. 2d. 12 In 1633 Alexander Corbatt of Arkboll was served heir male to his father 

1 Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. xx. fol. 53. Reg. Mag. Sig., 6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. no. 597. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
lib. xxix. no. 419. vol. xxxi. no. 79. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 30. 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 72. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 33. 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 118. 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxvii. fol. 37. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 7. 

5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 337. Reg. Sec. Sig., 10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. fol. 111. 

vol. xxviii. fol. 36. " Retours. 12 Ibid. 

VOL. II. 3 L 



450 ORIGINES [TARBAT. 

John Corbat in two-thirds of the lands of Arkboll with the pendicles, namely, the pondicle called 
Aldiquhilbar the marshes and moors named Mulboyeid lying contiguously the rabbit warrens 
lie linkis of Arkboll the marsh and moor named Lonteanaquhat the marsh and moor lying 
contiguously at the eastern part of the lands of Arkboll on its south side, and on the east side of 
the loch called Lochan tony the marsh and moor lying adjacent to the west part of Arkboll 
on its south side the great marsh and moor adjacent to the west part of Arkboll on its west 
side the marsh and moor adjacent to the northwest part of Arkboll near the sea shore named 
Knockangirrach together with the harbours of Portnagrigach, Portnacloich, Portnawest or the 
harbour of Saint John, the chapel of Saint John, the port called Camray, and the privilege of 
having boats for taking salmon, herring, and other fish within those harbours and other parts 
of the sea off the lands of Arkboll, with the 'wrack and wair' within the same bounds all 
lying in the earldom of Ross and sheriffdom of Innernes, united into one free tenandry, and of 
the old extent of 57s. Sfd. 1 

In 1512 King James IV. granted anew to John Vaus of Lochslyn the lands of Lochslyn in the 
earldom of Ross and sheriffdom of Innernys, which he had resigned, for yearly payment of one 
pound of cucumber (cucumeris) or of three pence at Whitsunday. 2 In 1534 King James V. granted 
to Robert Vaus burgess of Innernis a crown charter of the lands of Lochislin and Newtoun in the 
earldom of Ross, sold to him in that year by John Vaus of Lochislin, and to be held of him and 
of the King as Earl of Ross. 3 In 1535 a charter of William Makcullo of Plaidis is witnessed by 
John Vaus of Lochslyne. 4 In 1536 the same John resigned the lands of Lochslyn (with the 
exception of the lands of Newtoun), which King James V. then granted anew to him and 
Elizabeth Vrquhard his wife. 5 In 1538 that king again granted to Robert Vaus burgess of 
Innernys a crown charter of Lochislyn and Newtoun, sold to him by John Vaus of Lochislyn, 
and reserving to John Vaus and his wife Margaret (Elizabeth ?) Urquhard the liferent of 
Lochslyn, and to himself the lifercnt of Newtoun only. 6 The charter of John Vaus is given 
at Lochislyn, and witnessed among others by Sir Magnus Vaus vicar of Abirtarf, apparently a 
relative of the family, and at different times appearing in record also as notary public, chaplain, 
rector of Y, provost of Tain, and commissary of Inverness. 7 In 1554 Master Patrik Waus 
parson of Wigtouu had from Queen Mary a grant of the marriage of Katherine, Margaret, and 
Agnes Waus, daughters of the deceased John Waus of Lochslyn, and of any other heir suc 
ceeding to the lands of Lochslyn and Newtoun. 8 In 1562 appear in record Jasper Vaus of 
Lochslyn and Katherine Vaus his daughter. 9 In 1570 King James VI. granted in heritage 
to John Waus, the son and apparent heir of Jaspar Waus of Lochslyne, the nonentry and 
other dues of the lands of Lochslyne and Innerathy in the earldom of Ros and sherifFdom of 
Innernes, the lands of Lochslyne being in the King's hands since the decease of John Waus 

1 Retours. e R eg _ Mag . gjg^ m,. xxv i. no. 62. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

2 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xviii. no. 89. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xi. fol. 53. 

vol. iv. fol. 197. 3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. no. 140. 7 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvi. no. 62. See pp. 381, 418. 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. no. 245. 419. 

5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. no. 362. lltg. Sec. Sig., s Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxvii. fol. 91. 

vol. x. fol. 173. 9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. nn. 480, 481. 



TARBAT.] PAROCHIALES. 451 

at the field of , and those of Innerathy since the decease of Paul Maktyre, 

or in whatever other way. 1 In 1571 the same king granted in heritage to Walter Vrquhard 
sheriff of Cromartie the escheat of the goods that belonged to Jasper Waus of Lochslyne, who 
was denounced rebel and at the horn for non-payment to Master Robert Richardsoun commendator 
of Sanct Marie He, the King's treasurer, and to his assignee Andro Lamb indweller in Leith, 
of certain sums of money, for the payment of which Jasper Waus and John Neilsoun burgess 
of Innernes were sureties, namely, 20 due by John Reauch M'Fail in Cullevlar, 100 by 
William M'Farquhar in Cultclachquhy, 20 by John M'Farquhar in Cultclachquhy, and other 
sums entered in the treasurer's books. 2 In 1579 appears in record John Waus of Lochslyne, 
and in 1609 John Vauss junior was served heir to his father John Vauss of Lochslyne in the 
lands of Lochslyne and Newtoune, of the old extent of 30s. 3 

In 1520 King James V. granted to John Campbell thane of Calder the lands of Estir Ard 
called Corbettislandis in the sheriffdom of Innernys, formerly belonging to the deceased Master 
John Caldor precentor of Ross, and in 1522 he confirmed the grant.* In 1524 John Corbet of 
Estir Ard sold in heritage to James Dunbar, with remainder to his brother John Dunbar and 
his heirs, and to James's heirs whomsoever, the fourth part of the lands of Estir Ard, and the 
superiority of another fourth part on the east side, with the new lands between the bank of 
Saltoun and the bank of Wattertoun of his lands of Estir Ard, in the earldom of Ross and 
sheriffdom of Innernes. 5 In 1525 King James V. granted to James Dunbar a crown charter of 
the same lands. 6 In 1527 James Dunbar portioner of Estir Ard, on the narrative that John 
Corbett of Estir Ard had alienated to him the same lands under reversion on payment of the 
sum of 259 marks 10s., appointed Sir William Fudas chancellor of Caithness his assignee, and, 
the above sum having been paid, granted to him the lands. 7 In 1528 King James V. granted 
to Sir William a crown charter of the lands. 8 In 1531 that king granted to William Hay of 
Mayn the same lands and superiority, formerly belonging to the deceased Sir William Fudes 
chancellor of Caithness, and escheat to the King by reason of his bastardy. 9 In 1534 appear 
in record John Corbet of Estir Ard and Mariot Dunbar his wife. 10 In 1538 King James V. 
granted to James Dunbar of Tarbet and Elizabeth Leslie his wife the lands of Estir Ardis called 
Corbettisland, formerly belonging to the deceased Master John Caldor precentor of Ross, at 
whose death they reverted to the crown, and were granted by the King to Sir John Campbell of 
Caldor, who now resigned them. 11 In 1540 James Dunbar of Tarbert and Estir Arde sold to 
John Corbet of Arde and Katherine Roresoun his wife the fourth part of the lands of Estir 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 51. The name of 5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xx. no. 134. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
the battle is blank in the register. It must have been vol. vii. fol. 104. 6 Ibid, 
fought between the years 1538 and 1554, during which ~ Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 70. 

period occurred the Rout of Solway, the Battle of 8 Ibid. 

Ancrum, the Battle of Pinkie, and various sieges and 9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxiv. no. 144. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

minor conflicts. vol. ix. fol. 63. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 69. 10 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. no. 173. 

3 Retours. " Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvi. no. 63. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
' Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xx. nn. 86, 87. vol. xi. fol. 63. 



452 OEIGINES [TARBAT. 

Arde, and a fourth of the four crofts called Ladycroft, Makhucheounecroft, Scheipherdcroft, and 
the croft cultivated by Megot Enymmawnise, to be held for yearly payment of one penny 
blenchferme. 1 In the same year King James V. granted to John Corbet a crown charter of 
those lands 2 In 1542 that king granted to John M'Culloch, the nephew and heir apparent of 
Angus M'Culloch of Terrell, with remainder to Hugh and Angus the sons of Angus M'Culloch, 
a yearly revenue of 50s. from the lands of Estir Hard, which Angus had resigned. 3 In the 
same year he granted to George Monro of Davachcarty a crown charter of a fourth of the lands 
of Ester Arde, called the Intoune of Estir Arde, sold to him by his kinsman James Dunbar of 
Terbert. 4 In 1545 James Dunbar of Terbat sold to John Corbat of Arkeboill the fourth of 
Eistir Ard, and the fourth of the crofts called Ladycroft, M'Hutcheoncroft, Croft-nageracht, 
and Croftnacon (spelled also Croftnatoun and Croftnarone) ; and in 1546 Queen Mary granted to 
John Corbat a crown charter. 5 In 1552 that queen confirmed to Andrew Munro and Katherine 
Vrquharcl his wife the fourth of the lands of Eistir Ard, granted to them by George Monro 
of Dalcarty." In the same year she granted to George Monro of Dalcarty and Jonet Eraser 
his wife a crown charter of the fourth part of Eister Ard called the Intoun, and of other lands 
iu Ros sold to them by James Dunbar of Terbert. to whom at the same time she granted the 
right of reversion. 7 In 1553 John Makculloch of Tarrell, in fulfilment of a marriage contract, 
granted in liferent to Christina Monypenny the sister of Thomas Monypenny of Kingkcll, with 
remainder in succession to his heirs by her, and to his own heirs whomsoever, a yearly revenue 
of 50s. Scots from the lands of Eistir Aird ; and Queen Mary in the same year confirmed the 
grant. 8 In 1556 that queen confirmed to Marjory Ogiluy, the daughter of Walter Ogiluy 
of the Boyne, the liferent of the lands of Eister Airdis called Corbettisland, granted to her in 
1555 by James Dunbar of Terbert and Eistir Airdis. 9 In 1558 she granted to James Dunbar, 
the son and heir apparent of James Dunbar of Eister Terbert, the same lands of Eistir Airdis, 
which his father had resigned, reserving the liferent to the same Marjory Ogiluy. 10 In 1559 
she granted to John M'Culloch of Mekle Terrell a letter of reversion to the yearly revenue of 
50s. from the lands of Eistir Hard, alienated by him under reversion to Thomas Monypenny 
of Kinkell. 11 In 1567 she granted in heritage to Master David Chalmer the ward and other 
dues of the property belonging to the deceased John M'Culloch of Terrell, including the same 
yearly revenue of 50s. 12 In 1568 it was forfeited by Master David Chalmer, and granted by 
King James VI. to Andrew Monro of Newmore, to whom in 1571 it was confirmed by the same 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvii. no. 130. Reg. Sec. Sig., 8 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 124. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vol. xiv. fol. 36. vol. xxv. fol. 94. The Reg. Mag. Sig. gives the sum as 

2 Ibid. 5s., the Reg. Sec. Sig. as 50 Scots but from the 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 70. Reg. Sec. Sig., grant of 1542 and subsequent deeds the true sum ap- 
vol. xv. fol. 92. pears to be 50s. 

Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 285. Reg. Sec. Sig., 9 Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 281. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

vol. xvi. fol. 36. vol. xxviii. no. 6. 

5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 306. Reg. Sec. Sig., "> Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. no. 326. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vol. xix. fol. 75. This seems the same as the transac- vol. xxix. fol. 37. 

tion of 1540, yet both are recorded and dated as above. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxix. fol. 69. 

6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiv. fol. 119. " Ibid. I2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxvi. ff. 45, 46. 



TARBAT.] PAROCHIALES. 453 

king. 1 In 1577 Maviot M'Cullo was served heir to her father John M'Cullo of Mekill Tarrell 
in the same yearly revenue from the lands of Eister Ard. 2 In the same year King James VI. 
granted to Hugh Monro of Assint and Cristina Monro his wife a crown charter of the lands 
of half the Intoun of Easter Aird, occupied by Hugh Monro, and alienated in heritage to him 
and his wife by James Dunbar of Tarbart with consent of his wife Marjory Ogilbie ; granting 
at the same time to the latter parties a letter of reversion to the lands. 3 In 1578 the above 
yearly revenue of 50s. was resigned by Mariot M'Culloch, and granted in heritage by King 
James VI. to her and her future spouse George Munro the son and apparent heir of Andrew 
Monro of Newmoir. 4 In 1601 Alexander Dumbar of Tarbert was served heir to his father 
James Dumbar of Tarbert in the lands of Eistir Aird called Corbettisland with the mill, of 
the old extent of 17s. 5 In 1604 Master James Dumbar of Sanquhar, now of Tarbert, was 
served heir male and of entail to his brother Alexander Dumbar of Tarbert in the lands of 
Eistir Aird called Corbetsland, with the mill and fishings in salt and fresh water, of the old 
extent of 3. 6 In 1627 John M'Kenzie of Tarbat was served heir male to his father Sir 
Rotheric M'Kenzie of Coegache in the lands of Eistir Aird of the old extent of 3, 6s. 8d., 
and in a yearly revenue of 50s. from the same lands of the old extent of 23s. 4d. 7 

In the parish are three fishing villages, Ballintore, Hiltown, and Portmahomack. 8 

On a small creek near Tarbatness, named Port-chaistal, is the site of an ancient castle or fort, 
defended on the land side by a deep ditch, and by some supposed to be the ancient Ethirdover. 9 
From it the first Earl of Cromarty took the style of Castlehaven. 10 On the Black Moor in its 
neighbourhood are vestiges of an encampment. 11 

The castle of Ballone or Tarbat stands on the east shore of the parish, and is still nearly 
entire. 12 

There was a castle at Cadboll on the same coast, of which there seem to be few or no 
remains. 13 

In the north east of the parish, near a lake variously named Locheye, Lochlin, and Lochslin 
(which belonged of old to the abbot of Fearn), stands the castle of Lochslin, the old dwelling 
of the Vauses, consisting of two towers 60 feet high, and respectively 38 and 20 feet square. 14 
In it was born in the year 1630 Sir George Mackenzie of Tarbat, afterwards first Earl of 
Cromertie, one of a family who succeeded the Dunbars in the possession of the Tarbat 
estates. 15 

There seem to have been several other castles in the parish, one of which belonged to the 
Sinclairs of Dunbeath. 16 



1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 12; vol. xxxix. 
fol. 76. 

2 Retonrs. A 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 3. 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 68. 

5 Retours. 



Old Stat. Ace. 

1 Miller's Scenes and Legends, p. 276. New Stat. 
cc. 

2 Old and New Stat. Ace. 
Old Stat Ace. 

4 Old Stat. Ace. Miller's Scenes and Legends, p. 



6 Ibid. 7 Ibid. 296. Balnagown Charters. 

8 New Stat. Ace. 15 Old Stat. Ace. Miller's Scenes and Legends, p. 

8 Old Stat Ace. New Stat. Ace. 151. 16 Old Stat Ace. 



454 ORIGIN! S [NIOO. 

In the churchyard are a monument called the Dingwalls' Tomb, and fragments of a cross said 
to have stood on a small green mound at the east end of the church. 1 

At Hilton stands one of three obelisks supposed without much foundation to commemorate 
the three sons of a Danish king who perished at sea off the neighbouring coast. 2 One side 
is richly sculptured ; the other, from which the sculptures were erased about two centuries ago, 
bears a rude shield and label with an unmeaning Scotch inscription. 3 



NIGG. 

Nig 4 Nyg 5 Nigg. 6 (Map, No. 11.) 

THIS parish consists of the Hill of Nigg, of old called the Bishop's Forest, about 500 feet in 
height, and forming about one-third of the whole parish ; a fertile slope on the north west side 
of the hill ; a considerable extent of plain ; and a level tract called the Sands of Nigg covered 
by the sea at high water. 7 The cliffs extending along the Moray Firth and the entrance to 
the Firth of Cromarty, where the Hill of Nigg takes the name of the Northern Sutor, have 
an average height of 300 feet above the sea. 

In the year 1296 John of Dunbretan parson of the church of Nig of the county of Ros 
swore fealty to King Edward I. of England. 8 Thenceforward till the Reformation there seems 
to be no mention of this church, but it appears to have been a mensal church of the bishop of 
Ross. 9 In 1569 King James VI. presented Finlaii Mansoun reader at Nig to the vicarage of 
that church, vacant and in the King's hands ' as omittit and not gevin vp in rentall be the last 
possessour thairof or vthirwyis quhatsumcuir.' 10 In 1574 it was vacant, and in 1578 and again 
in 1581 King James VI. presented Alexander Clunes to the vicarage of Nig, vacant by the 
demission of Fynla Mansoun. 11 

The church, built in 1626, and repaired in 1725 and 1786, stands at Nigg near the Sands, 
apparently on the site of its predecessors. 12 

At Culiss there is a small enclosure named the Chapel Park, in which in last century were 
some slight vestiges of a chapel. 13 

1 New Stat. Ace. 6 Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. 

- Miller's Scenes and Legends, pp. 39-41. New " New Stat. Ace. " Ragman Rolls, pp. 142, 143. 

Stat. Ace. 9 Book of Assumptions. Old Stat. Ace. 

1 Miller's Scenes and Legends, p. 41. 10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 109. 

4 A. D. 1296. Ragman Rolls, pp. 142, 143. A. D. " Book of Assignations. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 
1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. A. D. 1569. Reg. 53; vol. xlvii. fol. 113. 

Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 109. A. D. 1578. Reg. Sec. 12 MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. Old Stat. Ace. 

Sig.,. vol. xlv. fol. 53. A. D. 1581. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. New Stat. Ace. 

xlvii. fol. 113. Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. old Stat. Ace. In 1585 Sir Jerome Paip appears 

Lib. Blaeu. as chaplain of Cullis, but whether at Cullis or within 

5 A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. A. D. the cathedral church is not stated. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 
1374. Book of Assignations. lii. fol. 71. 



NIGG.] PAEOCHIALES. 455 

At Shandwick there was a chapel and burying-ground, of the former of which the walls 
towards the end of last century were nearly entire. 1 There seems to have been near it another 
burying-ground, the enclosure of which was visible at the same date. 2 

At the Reformation the bishop of Ross gave up the teinds of the parish of Nig to the collector of 
thirds at 19 chalders 5 bolls of victual, 15, Os. 9d. in teind silver, and 29 muttons. 3 Among the 
sums yearly given from the bishoprick the bishop enumerates as given to the curates of Nyg and Ter- 
bat the sum of 40, and to the preacher of the same churches 50. 4 In 1568 Fynlay Mansone as 
reader had for his stipend 20, and in 1569 as vicar he had 40 ; the sum assigned as stipend to the 
reader at Nyg in 1574 was 20 marks, and in 1576 it was 6, 13s. 4d. the amount of the vicarage. 5 

In the year 1333 Hugh Earl of Boss, who died in that year, granted to his son Hugh of Ross 
the four davachs of Rarechys. 6 This Hugh of Ross is styled the first laird of Rarichies and 
Balnagown. 7 In 1351 he dates a charter at Culuys. 8 In 1368 he is styled Hugh of Ross lord 
of Raricheis. 9 He was succeeded by William of Ross, apparently his son. 10 In 1394 Walter of 
Ross was infefted in the lands of Rarichies on a precept of Euphame Countess of Ross. 11 In 1398 
Alexander of Lesley Earl of Ross, the son and heir of the deceased lady Eufamia Countess of Ross, 
granted to Walter of Ross lord of Raricheis a davach of Culluys in the mairdom of Delgeny. 12 
Walter was succeeded by Hugh Ross, whose son John was infefted in the same lands on a 
precept of Alexander of lie Earl of Ross between the years 1429 and 1449. 13 In 1490 King 
James IV., as tutor and governor of his brother James Duke of Ross, granted to David Ross, the 
nephew and apparent heir of John Ross of Balnagovn, the lands of Rareche, with the mills, 
brewhouses, tenants, and tenandries, and the lands of Estir Rareche, resigned by John Ross, and 
with reservation of the liferent to him ; and to the same David Ross and his wife Helen Kethel 
the lands of Westir Rareche and Culleis. u In the same year David Ross on a precept of the 
same king was infefted in the lordship of Balnagowne (which included Rareche) as heir to his 
grandfather John Ross of Balnagowne. 15 In 1546 Queen Mary granted to Alexander Ross of 
Balnagovne and Jonet Sinclare his wife the lands of Eistir Rereyche, with the pasture, ale 
houses, and fishings in salt water, and other lands in the lordship of Balnagovne, which Alexan 
der had resigned. 16 In 1550 Alexander Ros of Balnagoun sold to William Carnecors of Colmis- 
hill (or Colmislie) the lands of Westir Rarechy and the lands and mill of Culles in the earldom of 
Ross and sherhTdom of Innernes, and in special warrandice of those lands the land of Balnagoun, 
the mains and mill of the same, the lands of Mylhill, Garthie, Knockgarthie, and Culcarne. 17 At 
the same time he sold to the same William the lands of Estir Rarechy, and in special warrandice 
of them the lands of Mylntoun of Westray with the mill, the lands of Ballinlcich, and the lands 

1 Old Stat. Ace. 2 Ibid. 12 Balnagown Charters. 

3 Book of Assumptions. 4 Ibid. 13 Ibid. Gregory's Highlands and Isles. 

5 Register of Ministers. Book of Assignations. u Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xii. nn. 228, 229, 285. 

6 Balnagown Charters. Cronicle of the Earlis of 15 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 

Ross. 16 Ibid. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxix. no. 426. Reg. Sec. 

7 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. Sig., vol. xx. fol. 51. 

8 Balnagown Charters. 9 Ibid. 17 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 535. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
> Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. " Ibid. vol. xxiv. fol. 6. 



456 ORIGINS S [NIGG. 

of Mekill Doles. 1 In the same year Queen Mary granted to William Carnecors a crown charter 
of all the lands thus sold to him by Alexander Ross. 2 In 1554 she granted to Sir John Bellen- 
den of Auchnoule the noncntry and other dues of the lands of Rarechys Eistir and Westir, with 
the mill and lands of Cullis, in her hands since the decease of William Carncors of Colmslie. 3 
In 1557 she granted to Robert Carncors of Colmislie and Barbara Hume his wife the same 
lands and mill, which he had resigned to the Queen's mother as Regent of Scotland. 4 In 1577 
William Carncors of Colmislie was served heir to his father Robert Carncors of Colmislie in 
the same lands and mill, of the old extent of 43, 3s. 2d., and in the lands granted in war- 
randice of the same. 5 In 1578 on the narrative, notwithstanding that Alexander Ros of Bal- 
nagowne had sold in heritage to William Carnecors of Colmslie the lands of Westir Rarechie 
with the lands and mill of Culles, and in special warrandice of them the lands of Balnagowne, 
the demesne lands and mill of the same, and the lands of Mylnhill, Garthe, Knockgarthe, 
and Culcarne and notwithstanding that the said William had granted to the said Alexander 
two letters of reversion to the same, namely, one to the lands of Westir Rarechie on the 
payment of 2455 marks 5 shillings and 10 pence Scots, together with a letter of lease of the 
lands for five years following their redemption, the lessee paying yearly 9 chalders of bear and 
meal and 10 bolls of dry multure, or 10 marks for each chalder, 1 mart or 30 shillings, 8 mut 
tons or 4s. 2d. for each, 12 dozen of poultry or 4 pence for each poultry, and 12 bolls of oats 
or 4s. 2d. for each boll, with various other conditions specified in the letter of reversion, dated 
5 April 1550; and another letter concerning the lands and mill of Culles, redeemable on pay 
ment of 1000 marks Scots, together with a letter of lease of the lands and mill for five years 
after their redemption, the lessee paying yearly 4 chalders 13 bolls of victual, bear and meal, or 
10 marks for each chalder, 6 capons or 8 pence for each, and 100 eggs or 12 pence Scots, with 
other conditions specified in the letter of reversion of the same date as the former ; which rever 
sions Alexander Ros had assigned to Alexander Innes of Plaidis and his heirs, and which 
reversions and assignation Alexander Innes had sold in heritage to George Sinclare chancellor 
of Cathanes King James VI. granted to the same George and his heirs that, as soon as those 
conditions should be fulfilled by William Carnecors of Colmslie or his heirs, and the sums of 
money specified in the letters should be paid by them, George and his heirs should have full and 
free reversion to the said lands and mill, both the principal lands and those granted in warran 
dice, as Alexander Ros had before his alienation of the lands ; and the King constituted George 
and his heirs immediate hereditary tenants of the same. 6 In 1617 Sir William Sinclair of Catbol 
was served heir to his father George Sinclair of May in the lands of Wester and Eister Rarichies, 
and the lands and mill of Cullis, as principal, of the old extent of 15, and in the lands of 
Rarichies, of the old extent of 10 ; and in the lands formerly granted in warrandice of the 
same. 7 Rarichies and Guiles soon after became the property of the Roses of Kilravock 
through intermarriage with the Sinclairs of Dunbeath. 8 

1 Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 535. Reg. Sec. Sig., 4 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 557. 5 Retours. 

vol. xxiv. fol. 6. 2 Ibid. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 60. ~ Retours. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxvii. fol. 89. s The Family of Kilravock, pp. 93, 339, 340. 



siGo.] PAROCHIALES. 457 

A transaction in 1375 relating to the lands of Cathboll in Tarbat took place at the town of 
Nyg in the diocese of Eos, and was witnessed by brother Adam of Nyg, probably one of the 
canons of Fearn. 1 The mairdom of Nig, which included the lands of Logy extending to a davacli, 
with the brewhouse and brewlands of the same, belonged at the Reformation to the bishop of 
Ross. 2 The third of the dues of that mairdom, as stated by Bishop Sinclair, amounted to 
161, 18s. 3d., 1 chalder 6 bolls 2 firlots of victual, 8 marts, 42 muttons, 36 kids, and 16 
dozen and 6 capons. 3 Among the sums of money and victual yearly given out of the bishoprick 
the same authority states as given to the ' gantar' men of Nyg and Terbat 18 bolls victual and 
10. 4 In 1581 King James VI. confirmed three grants of land in the barony of Nyg 1. A 
grant by John Jacksoun, chancellor of Cathanes and commissary of the deceased Henry bishop of 
Ross, with consent of the dean and chapter, to Alexander Feme and his male heirs, with 
remainder to his eldest female heir without division, of the fourth part of the town and lands of 
Nyg extending to a quarter davach, a fourth of the alehouse of Nyg occupied by the grantee, 
an oxgang of the same lands formerly occupied by Thomas Tulloch, and the half of the town 
and lands of Pitcalzeane, extending to half a davach, occupied by Alexander and his son, re 
serving to the bishop the manor-place, mansion, orchard, garden, moothill, stanks (stagnis), and 
granary of Nyg ; 2. A grant by the deceased John bishop of Ross, with the consent of the dean 
and chapter, to the same Alexander Feme and his male heirs, with remainder as before, of an ox- 
gang of the town and lands of Pitcalzeane besides the half davach contained in the above grant 
of Bishop Henry ; and 3. A grant by Bishop John to Donald Fiddes in Nyg and his heirs of 
an oxgang of the lands and town of Nyg, with a fourth of the alehouse and its croft, and 
half an oxgang of the town and lands of Pitcalzean. 5 In 1582 the same king confirmed a 
grant by John bishop of Ross, cominendator of Lundoris, to Fynlay Mansoun in Pitcalzeane 
and his heirs of a fourth of the town and lands of Pitcalzean in the barony of Nyg, which 
Fynlay then occupied. 6 In the same year he confirmed a grant, made by the same bishop 
to Andrew Monro of Nig, of the half of the lands and town of Nig, and half the alehouse 
and its croft, with the keeping of the place and manor of Nig. 7 In 1584 he confirmed a 
grant by the deceased John bishop of Ross to Donald Gibsoun in Pitcalzean and his heirs 
of half an oxgang of the town and lands of Pitcalzeane, and the brewhouse and its croft 
then occupied and laboured by the same Donald. 8 In 1598 George Munro of Mekle Tarrell 
became bound ' to releve and skaythles keip' Elizabeth Ros the widow of Waltir Vrquhart sheriff 
of Cromertie, William Gordoun of Bredland her husband, William Ros of Kilrawak tutor testa 
mentary to Alexander Vrquhart the son of the said Waltir, and Alexander himself and his heirs 
at the hands of Donald Ros, Magnus Feme, David Feme, and Finlay Manson, the assignees 
appointed by the deceased Alexander Feme portioner of Pitcalyean to his right of reversion to 
the ' eister half dawine land' of the lands of Picalyean granted to him by the deceased Waltir 

1 Regist. Moraviense, pp. 180, 181. 5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 133. 

J Book of Assumptions. Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fol. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlviii. fol. 122. 

61. 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 57. 

3 Book of Assumptions. * Book of Assumptions. 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 38. 
VOL. II. 3 it 



458 ORIGINES [NIGG. 

Vrquhart and Alexander Feme of their renunciation of the reversion to Andro Munro the 
son and heir of the deceased David Munro and to his tutor testamentary. 1 In 1662 Andrew 
Fearne of Pitcahane was served heir to his great-grandfather Alexander Fearne of Balna- 
sturache in a fourth of the town and lands of Nyg, extending to a quarter davach, of the 
extent of 33s. 4d. feuferme; a fourtli of the alehouse of the same, of the extent of 5s. feu- 
ferme ; an oxgang of the town and lands of Nyg, of the extent of 16s. 8d. feuferme ; and 
half of the town and lands of Pitcahane, a half davach, of the extent of 53s. 4d. feuferme ; 
formerly in the sheriffdom of Innernes, but then in the sheriffdom of Ross. 2 

There are two small fishing villages, named Balnabruach and Balnapaling, each containing 
about 20 families. 3 

Hugh's Fair, named from its founder Hugh Rose of Kilravock, sheriff of Ross and Cromarty, 
was formerly hold at Wester Rarichie, but is now held at Ankerville, on the third Tuesday of 
November.* 

Behind the parish church were to be seen about 1790 the foundations of a building 90 feet 
long styled the bishop's house, and doubtless the remains of the old manor-place of Nigg men 
tioned in the above grants. 5 

In the year 1179 King William the Lion during an expedition into Ross built or fortified 
the castle of Dunscath. 6 Its site is believed to have been a little green knoll on a farm still 
named Castle Craig, situated at the foot of a steep declivity, where the slope of the south end of 
the Hill of Nigg or Northern Sutor of Cromarty terminates about 150 feet above the level of the 
sea. 7 The moat and part of an outwork on the land side may still be traced. 8 The lands of 
Dunskaith seem to have continued to be royal property till the erection of the college church of 
Tain in 1487, when with a revenue of two marks Scots from the royal ferry of Cromarty they 
were assigned by King James IV. to the chaplainry of Dunskaith in that foundation. 1 * 

A ledge of rock running for some miles along the east coast of the parish about half a mile 
from the shore, and covered at high water, is locally known as the King's Sous ; a cave on the 
adjacent shore is named the King's Cave ; and near it is Port-an-righ (the King's Harbour) ; 
and a path winding to the top of the rocks is styled the King's Path. 10 These names are 
traditionally connected with three sons of a king of Denmark, whose vessel or vessels are 
believed to have been wrecked on the ledge which bears their name. 11 It is further believed 
that the three young men were buried respectively at Hiltown in Fearn already noticed, and 
at Shandwick and Nigg in this parish, at each of which places a sculptured obelisk is still to be 
seen. 12 The obelisk at Shandwick, which stood in the ancient cemetery near the chapel, and 
which bore on one side a sculptured cross, and on the other sculptures of various kinds, was some 

1 History of the Family of Kilravock, p. 287. " Miller's Scenes and Legends, p. 46. 

2 Retours. * Reg. Mag. Sig.,lib. x. no. 309. Reg. Sec. Sig., Vol. 

3 New Stat. Ace. * Ibid. xviii. fol. 36. Sec p. 417. 

5 Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. See above, p. 457. I0 Old Stat. Ace. Miller's Scenes and Legends, p. 39. 

6 Chronica do Mailros, p. 'JO. Ford. Scot. lib. viii. c. 28. New Stat. Ace. 

7 Old Stat. Ace. Miller's Scenes and Legends, p. 44. " Ibid. 
New Stat. Ace. 12 Ibid. 



RILMUIE EASTER.] PAROCHI ALES. 459 

years ago blown down and broken into three pieces. 1 The obelisk at Nigg stands in the parish 
burying-ground, having on one side a cross and other sculptures, and on the other figures of 
men and animals. 2 It was blown down in 1725 by a storm which destroyed the belfry and broke 
the bell of the church, but is now replaced at the east end of that building. 3 

At Easter Rarichie is a detached hillock said to be the site of a Danish fort, and exhibiting 
sonic remains of a wall or rampart. 4 



KILMUIR EASTER. 

Kilmor 5 Kilmur 6 Kilmure-Madath 7 Kilmowr 8 Eistir Kilmure 9 
Kilmuir Eistir 10 Kilmure-Meddett 11 Kilmoor, Kilmoore. 12 (Map, 
No. 12.) 

THIS parish, stretching about 5 or 6 miles along the north coast of the bay of Nigg, and about 
3 miles inland, is flat and sandy on the coast, cultivated and wooded in the interior, and moor 
and wood in its upland parts. 13 

In the year 1296 Roger of Foderingeye, vicar of the church of Kilmor of the county of 
Ros, swore fealty to King Edward I. of England. 14 In 1475 James of Werk (Weik ?) parson of 
Kilmur witnesses an indenture between M'Gilleoin of Lochboy and Ross of Ballnagovin. 15 At 
the Reformation George Dunbar was parson of Kilmowr. 16 In 1569 King James VI. presented 
William Ros to the vicarage of Eistir Kilmuir, vacant by the decease of Alexander Sutherland. 17 
The reader in 1572 was Donald Reid, and in 1574 and 1575 Neil Monro. 18 In 1575 King James 
VI. presented Neil Monro to the vicarage of Kilmure or Kilmure-Meddett, vacant by the demis 
sion of William Ros parson of Roskin. 19 In 1585 the same king presented John Monro the son of 
John Monro in Pithraachtie to the vicarage of Kilmuir Eister, vacant by the deposition of Neill 
Monro for non-residence and not serving the cure. 20 The rector of Kilmuir Eister had a manse and 
garden in the canonry of Ross, showing this benefice to have been a prebend of the Cathedral. 21 

1 Old Stat. Ace. Millers Scenes and Legends, p. 41. u Ragman Rolls, p. 172. Though not quite certain, 

2 Millers Scenes and Legends, pp. 41, 42. it is at least highly probable that Kilmuir Easter is 

3 Old Stat. Ace. Scenes and Legends, p. 41. here intended. 

4 New Stat. Ace. " Acta Dom. Cone., p. 347. In 1456 Alexander 

5 A. D. 1296. Ragman Rolls, p. 1/2. Sutherland of Dunbeath bequeathed 200 to his son 

6 A. D. 1475. Acta Dom. Cone., p. 347. Alexander to pass for him on a pilgrimage to Rome, 

7 A. D. 1541. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiv. fol. 80. the money to be placed in the hands of Sir James of 
s A. D. 1561-66. Book of Assumptions. Weik(probably then or afterwards parson of Kilmuir). 
9 A. D. 1569. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 61. Misc. of Bannatyne Club, vol. iii. 

10 A. D. 1572-1574. Register of Ministers. Book of 16 Book of Assumptions. Apparently Kilmuir Eister. 
Assignations. A.D. 1585. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 61. 

fol. 26. A. D. 1621. Retours. l8 Register of Ministers. Book of Assignations. Reg. 

11 A. D. 1575. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 111. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 111. 

12 Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaen. 19 Rec. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 111. 

13 New Stat. Ace. and Maps. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. fol. 26. 21 Retours. 



460 ORIGINES [KILMUIR EASTER. 

The old church stood on the bay of Nigg, where the present was built in 1798, and succeeded 
one built in 1621. 1 Beside the present church is a round tower dated 1616. 2 

In 1368 Mariot of Hirdmannystoun, the daughter of the deceased Andrew of Hirdmatmystoun, 
resigned the patronage of the chapel of Balnagown. 3 About the same time William Earl of Eoss 
granted to his brother Hugh of Ross lord of Philorth the lands of Balnagown and others, 
resigned by the same Mariot, the grantee finding a chaplain to officiate twice or thrice in the 
week at the altar of the Virgin Mary in her chapel at Balnagown. 4 This chaplainry (whether in 
the mansion-house or otherwise does not appear), founded for daily prayers in behalf of the reign 
ing sovereign, and supported by the yearly payment of 4 from the lands and fishings of Estir 
Terbert, was held in 1542 by James Dunbar of Tuliglennis and Elizabeth Leslie his wife, and 
in 1558 by James Dunbar his son and apparent heir. 5 In 1642 Eobert Lord Eos of Halkheid 
and Molvill was served heir to his brother William Lord Eos of Halkheid and Melvill in the 
barony of Baluagoune, including the advowson of the chaplainry of Balnagoune, and the kirk- 
lands, the last being of the extent of 4 feufcrme. 6 

In 1512 the yearly payment made by Andrew Monro for the croft called the markland of 
Tulloch, then granted to him by King James IV., was one pound of wax to be paid at Mid 
summer within the chapel of Delny. 7 In 1521 King James V. presented Alexander Dunbar to 
the chaplainry of Delny. 8 In 1529 he presented David Dunbar to the same chaplainry, vacant 
or when vacant by the resignation of Alexander Dunbar. 9 In 1541 Master David Dunbar, 
chaplain of the chaplainry of the Virgin Mary in the parish of Kilmure Madath, with the 
consent of the King and of the bishop of Eoss, granted to Thomas Eos of Ballintrait and 
Elizabeth Dunbar his wife and their male heirs, with remainder to John Dunbar of Bannagefield 
and his male heirs, and to George Monro of Dalcarty and his male heirs, the churchlands called 
Preistishill and Vlladule, with the croft of John the Baptist, and the glebe, manse, houses, 
buildings, gardens, and pertinents of the same, belonging to the chaplainry, reserving to himself 
and his successors one acre of the lands of Preistishill, lying near the manse on the south side, 
for a manse and garden to be there constructed .all which were rented by husbandmen and 
tenants for 12 marks yearly the grantee paying yearly 12 marks, and 40s. in augmentation 
of the chaplain's rental, in all 10 Scots. 10 In 1580 King James VI. granted for seven years 
to Colin Dunbar the son of George Dunbar of Awach, 'for help of his sustentatioun and in- 
tertenement at the scoles,' the chaplainry of Delny, vacant by the decease of Master David 
Dunbar. 11 The chapel, dedicated, as we have seen, to the Virgin Mary, stood with its 
cemetery on a bank at Delny till near the end of the last century, when the stones of the 
building were removed and otherwise used, and the ground ploughed up, although it was 

1 MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. Old Stat. Ace. 6 Retours. 

New Stat Ace. ' Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xviii. no. 72. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

2 New Stat. Ace. vol. iv. fol. 195. 

3 Balnagown Charters. 6 R eg g ec g; g ; vo i v f o i 150. 

4 Ibid. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. viii. fol. 36. 

5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 255 ; lib. xxxi. no. 10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiv. ff. 80, 81. 
506. Reg. Sec. Sig., vo!. xlvii. fol. 31. 



KILMUIR EASTER.] PAKOCHIALES. 461 

afterwards enclosed and sown with grass. 1 At the same period an eminence near the chapel con 
tinued to bear the name Cnoc-an-tagairt or Priestshill, and in the same neighbourhood were the 
remains of a cross at the extremity of a village, the seat of the old baronial court of Delny. s 

In Baiamund's Eoll the church of Kylemure is taxed at 4 ; in the Taxatio Sec. XVI. at 
12, 8d. ; and in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued at 40. 3 At the Eeformation the par 
sonage and vicarage of Kilmowr, as given up by the parson George Dunbar to the collector of 
thirds, amounted yearly to 100 marks or 66, 13s. 4d. 4 In 1572 the reader at Kilmuir Eistir 
had for his stipend 20, and in 1574 he had 12, 13s. 4d. 5 

The chaplaniry of Delny, as we have seen, rented before 1541 at 12 marks 8 shillings, and 
let in that year for 10 Scots, did not in 1580 exceed the value of 20 marks yearly. 6 

The chaplainry of Balnagowne, belonging at the Reformation to Master Thomas Ros parson 
of Alnes, was then of the yearly value of 4, corresponding to the value given above at 
previous and subsequent dates. 7 

The mairdom (maragiurn) of Delny, a district including various lands in Kilmuir and other 
parishes, belonged of old to the Earls of Ross, one of whom, Earl William, died at Delny 
in 1323. 8 In 1356 a charter of William Earl of Ross (the grandson of the former) is dated at 
Delgeny in Ross. 9 In 1362 William Earl of Ross and lord of Sky granted certain lands in 
the mairdom of Delgeny to Henry Stewart and his wife Mariot the Earl's kinswoman. 10 In 
1368 an indenture between Mariot of Hirdmanystoun lady of Balnagown and Hugh of Ross 
lord of Raricheis is dated at Delgeny. 11 Earl William died at Delny in 1372. 12 In 1384 
Alexander Earl of Buchan, lord of Ross and of Badenoch, dates a charter at Delgeny. 13 In 
1463 John of Yle, Earl of Ross and Lord of the Isles, granted to Thomas the younger of 
Dingvale the lands of Vsuy in exchange for other lands in the mairdom of Delny. 14 In 1476 
King James III. granted to Elisabeth Countess of Ross, the widow of John Earl of Ross and 
Lord of the Isles, for her maintenance certain lands in Ross which she held in conjunct infeftment 
with her husband before his forfeiture ; and besides these, for her gratuitous services to the King's 
father and his consort, and considering that she took no part with her husband in his rebellion, 
he granted to her 100 of land and yearly revenue in Ross, including 20 marks of Delne and 
other lands. 15 In 1477, on attaining his majority, he confirmed the grant. 16 In 1485, 1489, 
and 1494 the lands belonging to the Countess, including Delgeny, were the subject of a long 
litigation between her and James of Dunbar of Cumnok, by the latter of whom they were 
occupied. 17 In 1586 King James VI. granted in heritage to his domestic servant William 
Keith master of his wardrobe, for his good service and for other reasons, certain lands in 

1 Old Stat. Ace. - Ibid. 9 Balnagown Charters. 10 Charter at Floors. 

3 MSS. in Adv. Lib. " Balnagown Charters. 



1 Book of Assumptions. 

5 Book of Assignations. 

6 See above, p. 460. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 31. 

7 Book of Assumptions. See above, p. 460. 

8 Charter at Floors. Retours. Cronicle of the Earlis 
of Ross. Balnagown Charters. Calendar of Fearn. 



2 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. Calendar of Fearu. 

3 Balnagown Charters. 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vi. no. 17. 

Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. no. 371. 

Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. viii. no. 40. 
' See TABBAT, pp. 443, 444. 



462 OEIGINES [KILMUIB EASTER. 

Ross, including Delny, its alehouse with toft and croft, its two alehouses without toft and croft, 
and tlie orcheard of Delny, for the yearly payment of 3 chalders bear and oatmeal, 8s. of 
bondage silver, and 6 poultry, for Delny 13s. 4d., and the same sura every 5 years as gressum, 
for the alehouse with toft and croft 13s. 4d. for the alehouses without toft and croft and 
30s. for the orcheard and the croft called Gardinaris Croft. 1 

In the year 1333 Hugh Earl of Eoss appears to have granted the lands of Balnagown to 
Hugh Eoss his son, the first laird of Balnagown. 2 Between 1336 and 1341 or 1351 
William Earl of Eoss (the son and successor of Earl Hugh) granted to Marion, the kins 
woman and alumpna of Emma the wife of Thomas of the Abbacy, the davach of Awchale, 
which belonged to Andrew of Erwynd, who witnesses the grant. 3 In 1341 a charter of 
the same earl is witnessed by William Marischal of Balnagown. 4 In 1351 Hugh 'of Eoss, the 
son of the deceased Hugh Earl of Eoss, confirmed to the same William and Mariot his wife 
the lands of Balnegown and Achawyl, granted to them by his father Hugh and his brother 
William Earls of Eoss. 5 In 1368 Mariot of Hirdmanystoun, the daughter of the deceased 
Andrew of Hirdmanystoun (and the widow of William Marischal), appears as lady of Balna 
goun. 6 In that year, by a deed dated at Balnagoun, she resigned the lands of Balnagoun, 
Achenwyl, and Gorty. 7 Apparently in the same year William Earl of Eoss and lord of Sky 
granted the same lands to his brother Hugh of Eoss lord of Philorth. 8 In 1374 or 1375 
they were confirmed to the same Hugh by King Eobert II. 9 In 1384 there appear in 
record William Eoss of Balnagown (the son of Hugh) and his wife the daughter of Lord 
Livingstone, and in 1394 and 1398 Walter Eoss his heir. 10 The latter, who was sur- 
named Clugganache, married Catherine the daughter of Paul M'Tyre. 11 Between 1429 and 
1449 appears John Eoss of Balnagown, the son and heir of Hugh Eoss. 1 '-' In 1451, in the 
chapel of Saint Nicolas in the cathedral church of Eoss, in presence of Andrew of Munro 
archdeacon of Eoss, commissary of Bishop Thomas and auditor of consistorial cases, and of 
other witnesses, John Eoss lord of Balnagowan produced certain charters, of which a transumpt 
was then made. 13 By an indenture made at Dingwall in 1475, and publicly recorded in 1494, 
it was agreed that a son of Alexander Eoss, the son and heir of John of Balnagovin, should 
marry a daughter of Hector M'Gilleoin of Lochboy. 1 * In 1488, in presence of Thomas bishop 
of Eoss and of Thomas abbot of Fearn, John Eoss of Balnagown resigned his house and 
living to Sir Gilbert Keith of Inverugie and to David his 'oye' and apparent heir. 15 In 
1490 King James IV., as tutor of his brother James Duke of Eoss, granted to David Eoss, 
the nephew and apparent heir of John Eoss of Balnagovn, the lands of the lordship of Balna- 
govn with the castle and manor, and other lands in Eoss, with the mills, brewhouscs, tenants, 
and tenandries, resigned by John Eoss, and reserving the liferent to him. 16 In 1492 David 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. I2 Ibid. 

- Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. I3 Balnagown Charters. 

1 Balnagown Charters. * Ibid. See TOROSAY, pp. 311, 312. 

5 Ibid. 6 Ibid. 7 Ibid. 8 Ibid. 15 Balnagown Charters. 

9 Rob. Index, p. 120, no. 04; p. 129, no. 32. lf> Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xii. nil. 228, 285. Cronicle of 

''' Croniclf of the Earlis of Ross. Balnagown Charters. the Earlis of Ross. 



KILMUIR EASTER.] PAROCHIALES. 463 

Ross of Balnagovn appears in record. 1 In 1527 King James V. granted to Walter Ross, the 
son and heir of the deceased Sir David Ross of Ballingovn, all the lands and rents which 
belonged to the latter. 2 In 1528 the same king granted the ward, relief, and nonentry of 
some of the lands of the barony to William Ros the brother of the deceased Walter Ros of 
Ballangowne. 3 In 1546 Queen Mary granted to Alexander Ros of Balnagovn and Jonet Sinclair 
his wife Ballinlone and other lands, with the woods, parks, and other pertinents of the lordship 
of Balnagovn, which Alexander had resigned.* In 1550 the same Alexander granted to William 
Carnecors of Colmislie the lands of Balnagoun, the demesne lands and mill of the same, and 
other lands of the barony, in special warrandice of the lands of Westir Rarechy and Guiles, 
which he had sold to William Carnecors. 5 In 1560 he granted the lordship of Balnagoune to 
his son and apparent heir George Ross. 6 In 1567 Master John Douglas, rector of the university 
of Saint Andrews, grants a receipt for 32, 2d. Scots as the board of George Ross younger 
of Balnagoune 'for all the time that he remainit student with me in the New College.' 7 In 
1576 the same Alexander Ros of Balnagoune and George Ros his son and heir appear in record. 8 
In 1578 the lands and barony of Balnagoune, including the demesne lands and mill, with other 
lands, formerly belonging in heritage to the same Alexander and George, and held by them 
of the bishop of Ros, the commendator of Ferne, and the sacrist of Thane, were apprised in 
favour of James Scrymgeour of Duddop, constable of Dundie. 9 In the same year King 
James VI. constituted George Sinclare chancellor of Cathanes and his heirs immediate hereditary 
tenants of the lands of Balnagovne and others granted in special warrandice of those sold to 
William Carnecors of Colmislie in 1550. 10 In 1581 George Ros fear of Balnagovne gave the liferent 
of certain lands of the barony, with the mill of Balnagovne and the astricted multures, to Marjory 
Campbell the daughter of the deceased Sir John Campbell of Calder, to whom King James VI. 
in the same year granted a crown charter of the lands. 11 In 1582 the same king granted to 
George Ros of Balnagowin and the male heirs of his body, with remainder to his male heirs 
whomsoever, several baronies, including the lands and barony of Balnagowin, the demesne lands 
of the same and others in that barony, formerly belonging to James Scrymgeour of Dudop, 
and resigned by him, to be held for the services formerly due. 12 

In 1362 William Earl of Ross and lord of Sky granted to Henry Stewart and his wife Mariot 
the Earl's kinswoman his land of Kennachrowe and Strathury, with all the men inhabiting the 
same, and the other pertinents lying in the mairdom of Delgeny, for yearly payment of one silver 
penny called sterling at Kennachrowe. 13 In 1372 the grant was confirmed by King Robert II. 1 * 
In 1536 John Denowne of Dauidstoun, in implement of a contract between him and William 
M'Culloch of Pladdis, granted to Dowy Makculloch and her heirs by his son Donald Denowne, 

1 Coll. de Eeb. Alb., p. 85. 6 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. vi. fol. 67 ; vol. vii. fol. 74. 7 Ibid. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 140. See KINCARDINE, Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. fol. 102. 
p. 412. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 67. 

4 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxix. no. 426. Reg. Sec. Sig., 10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 60. See NIGG, p. 456. 
vol. xx. fol. 61. Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. ff. 99, 105. 

5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 535. Reg. Sec. Sig., 12 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 11. 

vol. xxiv. fol. 6. See Nioo, p. 455. 13 Original at Floors. " Ibid. 



464 ORIGINES [KILMUIR EASTER. 

with remainder to his own heirs, the three 'eist oxgangis' of his land of Candoroy. 1 In 1547 
Queen Mary granted to William Dennowne of Petnele the nonentry and other dues of the lands 
of Candenrew and others in Eoss, in her hands since the decease of Alexander Dunnone of 
Dauidstoun. 2 In 1549 John Denone, lord of half the lands of Daweistoun and of all the lands 
of Kandcrwif and Strathworie, sold to Walter Innes dweller in Calrossy the lands of Kanderwiff 
and Strathworie in the earldom of Eoss and sheriffdom of Innernys ; and in the same year Queen 
Mary granted to Walter Inncs a crown charter of the lands. 3 In 1556 the same queen con 
firmed the grant of 1536, and Donald Donowne, the son and heir of the deceased John Donowne 
of Dauidstoun, appears also as Donald Donowne of Kenroy.* In 1563 Queen Mary granted the 
lands of Cayndruiff and Straithworie to Walter Innes of Cayndruiff and Margaret Maldntosche 
his wife. 5 In 1575 William Innes was served heir to his father Walter in the same lands, lying 
in the lordship of Eoss, of the old extent of 40s. 6 In 1577 King James VI. granted in heritage 
to William Innes of Candereuff and Katharine M'Kanze his wife, with remainder to William's 
heirs whomsoever, the lands of Candereuff which he had resigned, to be held of the crown for 
the usual services. 7 In 1628 Beatrix, Margaret, and Agnes Innes were served heirs portioners 
to their father William Innes of Calrossie, and Donald Monro the lawful son of George Monro of 
Tarloggie was served heir portioner to the same William his maternal grandfather, in the lands of 
Kendriue and Strathworie. 8 

In 1463 John of Yle, Earl of Eoss and Lord of the Isles, granted to Thomas the younger 
of Dingvalo, with remainder to his brother John of Dingvale and his heirs, and to the better 
and more worthy successor of their relatives of the name of Dinguale, the lands of Vsuy in 
the earldom of Eoss in exchange for the third part of Arkboll, and the lands of Inchfure in 
the mairdom of Dclny. 9 In 1464 King James III. confirmed the grant. 10 Among the 100 of 
lands and rents in Eoss granted by King James III. in 1476, and confirmed by him in 1477, 
to Elizabeth Countess of Eoss were included 10 marks in victual of the lands and town of 
Meithaite with its two mills, and 10 marks of Mekle Meithaute. 11 In 1512 King James IV. 
granted to Andrew Monro the lands of Myltoun of Meath with the mill, the office of chief 
mair of the earldom of Eoss, and the croft called the markland of Tulloch, in the earldom of 
Eoss, which lands of Myltoun with the mill and mairdom had been granted to Andrew and one 
heir by a letter under the privy seal, the grantee paying yearly for Myltoun 8 chalders 4 bolls of 
victual half bear half meal of the lesser measure of the earldom and to augment the rental by 8 
bolls, and for the croft of Tulloch one pound of wax on the feast of Saint John the Baptist 
(24 June) within the chapel of Delny. 12 In 1527 King James V. granted to Thomas Eoss of 
Ballintred the lands of Arnagaig, Ballintred, Feauchtelauchy, and Knoknapark, extending in the 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 393. Reg. Sec. Sig., 6 Retours. 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliv. ff. 42, 43. 

vol. xxviii. fol. 70. 2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxi. fol. 30. s Retours. 

5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 419. Reg. Sec. Sig., 9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vi. no. 17. 10 Ibid. 

vol. xxiii. fol. 79. n Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. no. 371 ; lib. viii. no. 40. 

4 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. nn. 358, 393. Reg. Sec. See above, p. 461. 

Sig., vol. xxviii. ff. 33, 70. 12 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xviii. no. 74. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxi. fol. 97. vol. iv. fol. 195. 



KILMUIB EASTER.] PAROCHIALES. 465 

King's rental respectively to 26s. 8d., 40s., 20s., and 26s. Sd., in all 8 marks 6 shillings and 
8 pence, for the yearly payment of 7, to augment the rental by 26s. Sd. 1 In 1541 Thomas 
Ros of Ballintrait appears in record as the grantee of the chapellands of Delny in the parish of 
Kilmure-Madath, a name apparently derived to the parish from the lands of Meddat or Meithat. 2 
In 1586 King James VI. granted in heritage to his domestic servant William Keith for his good 
service certain lands in Ross, including Mekill Methat, its alehouse with toft and croft, and its 
alehouse without toft and croft, Badebaa, Knocknapark, Ballintraid, Fayclachie, Ardnagaag, 
Calrcchy, and Inschefuir ; the grantee paying yearly for Mekill Methat 6 chalders of bear and 
oatmeal of the measure of Leith, 16s. of bondage silver, 6 poultry, and the usual services for 
the alehouse of the same with toft and croft 13s. 4d. and the same sum every 5 years as gressum 
and for the alehouse of the same without toft and croft 6s. 8d. and the same every 5 years as 
gressum ; for Badebaa 20s., and the same every five years as gressum ; for Knocknapark 26s. 8d., 
6s. of bondage silver, and as gressum every 5 years 26s. 8d., with the usual services ; for Ballintraid 
40s., 9s. of bondage silver, one poultry, and 40s. gressum, with the usual services ; for Feyclachie 
26s. 8d., 6s. of bondage, 2 poultry, and gressum 26s. 8d., with the usual services ; for Ardnagag 
the same ; for Calrechy 26s. 8d. ; and for Inschefuir 40s., 9s. of bondage silver, 1 poultry, and 
40s. of gressum every 5 years, with the usual services. 3 In 1615 Arthur Sutherland was served 
heir to his father Alexander Sutherland of Inschefure in the town and lands of Calrichie of the 
extent of 26s. 8d., and the lands of Inschfure of the extent of 40s., in the barony of Delny and 
earldom of Ross.* In 1623 George Monro of Mylntoun was served heir to his father George 
Monro of Tarrell in the lands of Mylntoun of Meddat with the mills and the office of chief mair 
of the earldom of Ross, of the extent of 8 chalders 4 bolls of victual ; a croft named the mark- 
land of Tulloch in the earldom of Ross, of the extent of one pound of wax ; and the lands and 
town of Meikill Meddat or Mcddatmoir, of the extent of 6 chalders of bear and oatmeal and 
other dues its alehouse with toft and croft of the extent of 13s. 4d. and its other alehouse 
without toft and croft, of the extent of 6s. 8d. in the barony of Delnie, earldom of Ross, and 
sheriffdom of Innernes. 5 

There are villages at Milntown, Bartaraville, and Portlich, the first of which has a population 
of 200. 6 

On the coast near New Tarbat House are the ruins of the castle of New Tarbat the seat of the 
Earls of Cromarty. 7 

In the year 1590 Catharine Ross, Lady Fowlis, one of the Balnagown family, was tried 
and condemned to be burned for witchcraft. 8 

At Kenrive (the ancient Kennachrowe or Kanderuiff ) on a hill still bearing that name there 
is a large cairn, and close to it the foundation of a large building (probably the remains of the 
old mansion-house and chief messuage of the property). 9 

1 Keg. Mag Sig., lib. xxii. no. 36. 6 New Stat. Ace. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiv. ff. 80, 81. 7 New Stat. Ace. and Maps. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fol. 46-48. 8 Pitcairn's Crim. Trials, vol. i. pp. 192-201. 
Retours. 5 Retours. 9 New Stat. Ace. 

VOL. II. 3 K 



466 ORIGINES [LOGIE EASTER. 



LOGIE EASTER. 

Logy 1 Logy Eistir 2 Logic. 3 (Map, No. 13.) 

Tins parish, the name of which in Gaelic signifies ' a hollow,' is chiefly composed of the upper 
part of the strath of the water of Rorie, named in Gaelic 'Abher' (the river), and latterly known 
as the water of Balnagown. 4 

Of this parish we have but scanty notices, and no early notice except its entry in Bisset's 
copy of Baiamund's Roll. 5 In 1497 King James IV. presented Sir Donald Morisoun to the 
vicarage of Logy (probably that of Logy Easter) in the diocese of Ross, when it should be 
vacant by the resignation of Sir John Rathre. 6 The church appears in records of the sixteenth 
century, and about the period of the Reformation the rector appears to have been Thomas Hay, 
and the vicar Sir Donald Reid. 7 In 1581 King James VI. presented Master John Ros to the 
parsonage and vicarage of Logy Eister, vacant by the decease of Master Thomas Hay abbot of 
Glenluce. 8 In 1584 King James VI. confirmed a grant by Master Thomas Hay rector of Logie, 
given with consent of Alexander bishop of Ross and the dean and canons of the cathedral to 
John Irving burgess of Rosemarkie and Margaret Gumming his wife, and to John's male heirs, 
of the croft of the rectory of Logie lying in the canonry of Ross (showing the church to 
have been a prebend of the cathedral). 9 In 1619 Thomas Irwing was served heir to his 
father, Andrew Irwing in the canonry of Ross, in the manse of the rectory of Logie with 
the garden within the same canonry.' 

The church originally stood in a hollow on the water of Rorie, which gave name to the 
parish. 11 The present church was built about the middle of the last century on a small eminence 
at a short distance from the former site. 12 

The eminence on which the modern church is built is named Chapelhill, implying the previous 
existence of a chapel, the name and dedication of which seem to be unknown. 13 

In Baiamund's Roll the rectory of Logy is taxed at 5, 6s. 8d. ; in the Taxatio Sec. xvi. 
at 16, 10s. 3d.; and in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued at 53, 6s. 8d. u At the 

1 A. D. 1270. Baiamund's Roll. A. D. 1497. Reg. ' Bisset's Rolls of Court, p. 209. 
Sec. Sig., vol. i. fol. 23. A. D. 1534. Lib. Taxationum. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. i. fol. 23. 

A. D. 1500-1600. Tax. Sec. xvi. A. D. 1561-1566. ~ Lib. Taxationum. Tax. Sec.xvi. Bookof Assump- 

Book of Assumptions. Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps tions. Book of Assignations. 

in Adv. Lib. Blacu. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 115. 

2 A.D. 1572. Register of Ministers. A. D. 1574. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. fol. 60. 
Book of Assignations. A. D. 1581. Reg. Sec. Sig., 10 Retours. 

vol. xlvii. fol. 115. " Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. Modern Maps. 

3 A. D. 1584. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. fol. 60. A. D. JIS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. 

1619. Retours. 12 Old and New Stat. Ace. 13 Ibid. 

* Old Stat. Ace. Modern Maps. MSS. in Adv. Lib. 



LOGIE EASTER.] PAROCHIALES. 467 

Eefonnation the parsonage of ' Logy and Channonry in Ros' was let yearly for 100 
marks, or 66, 13s. 4d. ; and the vicarage extended yearly to the sum of 12. 1 In 1572 
William Ross Thomassone, exhorter at Logy Eistir, had for his stipend 40, and in 1574 
Donald Reid, reader, had 13, 6s. 8d. and the kirklands. 2 

The history of the lands of Strathworie, which lay partly in this parish, seems to have been 
the same as that of the lands of Kanderuiff or Kenrive in Kilmuir. 3 

In 1370 William Earl of Ross granted to William of Ross, the son and heir of the deceased 
Hugh of Ross, the lands of Pitmadwy within the bailiary of Delgeny, although he had for 
merly granted the same land in liferent to Master William of Dyngeual. 4 In 1476 King 
James III. granted to Elizabeth Countess of Ross, in addition to lands granted to her for her 
maintenance, 100 of yearly revenue from certain other lands in Ross, including 10 marks 
of Drumgill and 10 marks of Glossery (probably Calrossy). 5 In 1556 a charter is witnessed 
by Walter Innes in Calrossy. 6 In 1578 the lands of Pettecowy (Pitmadowy) were included in 
the barony of Balnagowne, formerly belonging in heritage to Alexander Ros of Balnagowne, 
and in that year apprised with other lands in favour of James Scrymgeour of Duddop constable 
of Dundie. 7 In 1582 the same lands were apprised by James Scrymgeour in favour of Alex 
ander Ros, and granted by King James VI. to Alexander's son George Ros of Balnagowin and 
the male heirs of his body, with remainder to his male heirs whomsoever. 8 In 1586 the same 
king granted in heritage to William Keith the master of his wardrobe, for his good service and 
other reasons, various lands in Ross, including Calrossie, Drummediat, Glastowlie, and Drum- 
gillie ; the grantee paying for Calrossy 3 chalders bear and oatmeal, 8s. 4d. of bondage silver, and 
4 poultry, with the usual services for Drummediat 3 chalders bear and oatmeal of the measure 
of Leyth, 8s. of bondage silver, and 4 poultry, with the usual services and for Glastowlie 6 
chalders bear and oatmeal of Leith measure, 16s. of bondage silver, 9 poultry, and the usual ser 
vices. 9 In 1619 John Monro was served heir to Andrew Monro of Daan his father in the town 
and lands of Pitmadowie in the earldom of Ross, of the old extent of 4. 10 In 1623 Walter Ros 
of Kindeis was served heir male to his father Hugh Ros of Kindeis in the lands of Morachwater 
with that part of them called Litill Rasches in the barony of Balnagown pro principali, and in 
warrandice of those lands in the south and lower quarter of the town and davochland of Pit- 
maduthie, lying next the lands of Drumgill, commonly called Auchownatone, in the same barony, 
of the extent of 20s. 11 In 1642 Robert Lord Ros of Halkheid and Melvill was served heir to 
his brother gennan Lord William in the lands of Pitticowy or Pitmadowy, included as before 
in the barony of Balnagoune. 12 In 1644 Master Thomas Rig of Athernie was served heir to 
his father William Rig of Athernie in the barony of Balnagown, including the town and lands 



1 Book of Assumptions. 6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 269. 

2 Book of Assignations. 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 67. 

3 See KILMUIR EASTER, pp. 403, 464. 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 11. 
1 Balnagown Charters. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. 
5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. no. 371. See KH.MCIR 10 Retours. 

EASTER, p. 461. " Ibid. 12 Ibid. 



468 ORIGINES [ROSKBEN. 

of Pitmaduthie. 1 In 1652 David M'Culloch was served heir to his immediate elder lawful 
brother James M'Culloch of Kindeis in the fourth part of the town and davochlands of Drum- 
gillie, in the barony of Delny and earldom and sherifl'dom of Ross, of the extent of the fourth 
part of three chalders of bear and other dues. 2 

In the year 1586 King James VI. confirmed a grant by John bishop of Ross and commen- 
dator of Lindoris, with the consent of his dean and chapter, to William Ros in Logy and 
Margaret Monro his wife, and to their heirs, with remainder to William's heirs whomsoever, 
of the lands of Logy extending to the quarter of a davach, with the brewhouse and brewlands, 
then occupied by William Ros, in the barony of Nig and sheriffdom of Innernes. 3 

At Blackhill there is a cattle market in the month of May. 4 

About the middle of the parish is a ridge of small hills, on one of which, partly surrounded 
by a ditch, stood a gallows. 5 Near the end of the ridge is a deep narrow pool of water named 
Poll-a-bhaidli (the pool of death), in which the last feudal execution, that of a woman for 
child-murder, took place about the middle of the last century. 6 



IIOSKEEN. 

Rosken 7 Roskene 8 Roskyne 9 Roskin 10 Roskein 11 Roschene 12 - 
Roskyin 13 Boscuyn." (Map, No. 14.) 

THIS parish, lying on the north of the water of Alnes and Loch Moir, is level along the coast 
of the Firth of Cromarty, rises gently for a few miles inland, when it becomes hilly, and attains 
its. greatest height in Cairn Coinneag, said to be 3000 feet above the sea. 15 In the upper part 
is an extensive valley named Strathrusdale. 16 

In 1528 Master James Knollis (or Knowis) was a canon of Ross, prebendary of Roskene, and 
preceptor of the Hospital of the Virgin Mary beside Linlithgw. 17 In 1533 the same Master 
James appears as rector, and in 1534 Andrew Ros was vicar of Roskene. 18 In 1555 and between 
1561 and 1566 the rector was Master Grawin Dunbar. 19 In 1573 (1 January) King James VI. 
presented Master James Bering to the parsonage and vicarage of Roskene, and to the parsonage 

1 Retours. 2 Ibid. ' A. D. 1575. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 111. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fol. 61. " A. D. 1584. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. fol. 73. A. P. 

New Stat. Ace. 6 Old Stat. Ace. Ibid. 1607. Retours. 

7 A. D. 1270. Baiamund's Roll. 12 A. D. 1584. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 14. 

8 A. D. 1528. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 223. A.D. Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. 
1533. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 160. A.D. 1534. Reg. " Circa A. D. 1640. Blaeu. 

Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. no. 96. A. D. 1500-1600. Taxatio >* New Stat. Ace. and Maps. 16 Ibid. 

Sec. xvi. A.I). 1573. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. ff. 43, 58. " Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 223. 

A. D. 1574-1576. Book of Assignations. A. D. 1584. > 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 160. Reg. Mag. Sig., 

Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 40. A. D. 1621. Retours. lib. xxv. no. 96. 

9 A. D. 1555. Pitcairn's Crim. Trials, vol. i. p. 376. I9 Pitcairn's Crim. Trials, vol. i. p. 376> Book of 
A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. Assumptions. 



BOSKEEN.] PAROCHIALES. 469 

and vicarage of the kirk of Newnakle, vacant by the decease of Gawin Dunbar. 1 In the same 
year (14 March) he presented William Ros to the same parsonage and vicarage, which belonged 
to the deceased Gawane Dunbar. 2 In 1574 and 1576 William Eos Thomassoun was minister, and 
William Monro Huchesoun was reader at Roskene and Newynkill. 3 In 1575 William Ros is stvled 
parson of Roskin, and in that year resigned the vicarage of Kilmure Meddett.* The rector 
of Roskene as a prebendary had a manse with garden and croft within the canonry of Ross. 5 

The church, apparently dedicated to Saint Ninian, seems to have originally stood at Noinikil a 
short way from the coast, where its ruins still remain, and the site seems to have been afterwards 
changed to Roskeen nearer the coast, where the present church was built in 1832. 6 There are 
still two glebes, one beside each church. 7 

In Baiamund's Roll the rectory is taxed at 8, and in the Taxatio Sec. xvi. at 24, 16s. 8 In 
the Libellus Taxationum it is valued at 80. 9 The rental of the parsonage at the Reformation, 
wholly received in money from the tenants, amounted to 101, 6s. 8d., of which 10 yearly 
were paid to the choristers. 10 In 1574 the minister at Roskene had a stipend of 85, 15s. 2d., 
and the reader 20 ; in 1576 they had respectively 105, 15s. 2d. and 20 ; the reader being 
paid by the minister. 11 

In 1361 James Prat of Kerdale, the son of the deceased John Prat lord of Estir Glenarundy, 
sold to Hugh Ross lord of Philorth a yearly revenue of 6 marks sterling due to him from the 
lands of Fraswiln, Okyngil, and Harpsdol, for 35 marks sterling to be paid by Hugh on recovering 
the same by law. 12 In 1384 Alexander Earl of Buchan, lord of Ross and of Badenoch, ordered 
Hugh of Munro, his bailie of the earldom of Ross, to give to William of Ross seisin of the lands 
of Innerkstelane and Hospostyl. 13 In 1490 King James IV., as tutor of his brother James 
Duke of Ross, granted to David Ross, the nephew and apparent heir of John Ross of Balnagovn, 
certain lands, including the lands of Hospitall, resigned by John Ross, to whom the liferent was 
reserved. 1 * In 1597 Gilbert, Gray was served heir to his father John Gray of Fordell in the 
lands and town of Hospitill in the earldom of Ross, of the old extent of 10 shillings. 15 The 
lands of Hospitill appear to be the same as those of Obstuill or Obsdale, on which a chaplainry 
was founded in the cathedral church of Ross. 16 

In the year 1473 appears in record Andro Merser of Inchbreky. 17 In 1511 King James IV. 
granted in heritage to Andrew Stewart, the son of Jonet Terrell lady of Innachbreky, with 
remainder to Jonet and her heirs, the lands of Innachbreky and Balnegall in the sheriffdom of 
Innernys, resigned by Jonet, and reserving the liferent to her. 18 In 1512 the same king granted 
to Jonet Terrell and her heirs the lands of Innerbreky and Balnegall in the earldom of Ross, for 
merly resigned by her to the King as Earl of Ross in favour of the deceased Andrew Stewart her 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 43. 8 MS. in Adv. Lib. Ibid. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 58. Book of Assumptions. u Book of Assignations. 

3 Book of Assignations. 2 Balnagown Charters. la Ibid. 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 111. * Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xii. no. 285. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. fol. 73 ; vol. li. fol. 40. Retours. 5 Retours. I6 See RoSEMABKlE,pos<. 

6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. ff. 43, 58. Book of Assig- 7 Acta Auditorum, p. 30. 

nations. Blacu. Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. 18 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iv. fol. 100. Balnegall appears 

7 Old and New Stat Ace. to lie in the parish of Tain. 



470 ORIGINES [BOSKEEN. 

son and his heirs, after which resignation Andrew died without lawful heirs, and the lands fell to 
the crown by reason of nonentry. 1 In 1529 Jonet Terrell resigned the same lands, which King 
James V. then granted in heritage to her and her husband Walter Innes of Touchis." In 1533 
William M'Culloch of Pladis dates a charter to Walter Innes of Towchis at Innerbreke. 3 In 1534 
the same Walter, with consent of his wife Jonet Torrall, granted to John Innes his son the lands 
of Innerbreky and Balnegall, on condition that John should marry in facie eccksie Mariot the 
daughter of Donald Terrall, whom James Innes the son and heir of Walter ought to have married 
in terms of a contract between Walter and Jonet. 4 In the same year King James V. confirmed 
the grant. 5 In 1547 Queen Mary granted the same lands with the tofts and crofts, which John 
Innes of Innerbreky had resigned, to Walter Innes his son and apparent heir, to be held of the 
Queen as Countess of Ross, and reserving the liferent to John Innes and a reasonable terce to 
Mariot Terroll his wife." In 1557 the same Walter, the son and apparent heir of John Innes of 
Innerbrakye, in implement of a marriage contract, granted to Margaret the daughter of Kenneth 
Mackenze of Brawne the liferent of the lands of Balingall in the earldom of Eoss, reserving the 
terce to Mariot the wife of John. 7 In the same year Queen Mary confirmed the grant. 8 In 
1608 James Innes of Uvachbrekie was served heir to his father Walter in the town and lands of 
Uvachbrekie, of the old extent of 23s. 4d., and the town and lands of Innerachnegall, of the same 
old extent. 9 

Among the lands from which a yearly revenue of 100 was granted by King James III. to 
Elizabeth Countess of Ross in 147C, and confirmed by him in 1477, were included 10 marklands 
of Kincragy and 10 marklands of Culquhunze. 10 The same lands were in 1586 included in a 
grant by King James VI. to William Keith the master of his wardrobe, the grantee paying yearly 
for Kincraig with its alehouses 4, 13s. 4d, 20s. of bondage silver, 12 bolls of bear, 12 bolls of 
oatmeal, 2 marts, 2 muttons, and 12 bolls of oats, and for Culkenzie 5, 10s. 8d., 12 bolls of 
bear, 12 bolls of oatmeal of Leyth measure, 4 marts, 4 muttons, and as grassum every five years 
5, 10s. Sd. 11 In 1615 Arthur Sutherland was served heir to his father Alexander Sutherland of 
Inschefure in three oxgangs and a sheaf [garbata] of land, commonly called ' the thrie oxgang and 
schaifeland ' of the town and lands of Culkenzie, in the barony of Delny and earldom of Ross, of 
the extent of 43s. lOd. and other dues. 12 In 1635 Iver M'lver of Culkenzie was served heir 
to his father Iver M'lver of Lackmaline, portioner of Culkenzie, in 10 sheaves and a half of the 
town and dauchland of Culkenzie, commonly called ten ' scheaffis and ane halfe scheafland,' in 
the barony of Delny then newly erected, of the extent of 24s. 7d. and other dues ; and in 
7 sheaflands of the same lands of Culkenzie, extending to an oxgang and a half, in the same 
barony, and of the extent of 16s. 4d. and other dues. 13 

i Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xviii. no. 125. Reg. Sec. Sig., ' Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 359. 
vol. iv. fol. 163. s Ibid 

- Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxiii. no. 66. Reg. Sec. Sig., 9 Retours. 
vol. viii. fol. 84. 10 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. no. 371 ; lib. viii. no. 40. 

:i Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. no. 42. See KILMUIR EASTER, p. 461. 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxv. no. 96. b Ibid. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ft'. 46-48. 

6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 74. " Retours. 13 Ibid. 



ROSKEEN.] PAROCHIALES. 471 

In 1538 King James V. granted to Huchoun Eos for five years the three marklands of 
Brekauche, the five marklands of Auchneclayeh, the ten marklands of Tulichmeanych, and the 
mill of Cragmylne in the earldom of Eos and sheriffdom of Innernys, for the yearly payment of 
12 for the lands and of 18 bolls of ferme for the mill, or in all IS. 1 In 1586 King James VI. 
granted in heritage to William Keith master of his wardrobe, for his good services and other 
reasons, lands in Ross including Craigmyln with the multures and alehouses, Tullichmanich, Tul- 
lichmoir, and Brekhauch ; the grantee paying yearly for the Mill of Craig with the multures 1 
chalder 2 bolls of bear, and for the alehouse 6s. 8d. and the same sum every five years as gressum 
for Tullichmanich 4, 6s. 8d., 2 marts, 2 muttons, 6 bolls of dry multure half bear half meal, 
and 16s. 8d. of bondage silver for Tullichmoir 5, 18s., 1 chalder 14 bolls of bear, 12 bolls of 
oats, and 4 muttons and for Brekhauch 50s., one poultry, 4s. of bondage silver, and 50s. 
every five years as gressum. 2 

In 1582 King James VI. confirmed a grant in heritage, by John bishop of Ross to 
the deceased John Innes of Innerbrekie, of the mill of Roskeyn and the astricted mul 
tures and dues. 3 In 1607 Thomas Urquhart sheriff of Cromertie was served heir to 
his uncle John Urquhart in a davach of the lands of Roskeyn, of the old extent of 9, 
lls. 4d. 4 In 1623 Walter Innes of Auchintoul was served heir male, of entail, and of 
provision, to James Innes of Calrossy his kinsman in the lands of Roskene, a davach, of 
the extent of 8 and other dues the alehouse of Roskene with its croft, of the extent of 
13s. 4d. and other dues and the lands of Debadaill, of the same extent as the alehouse 
of Roskene. 5 

In 1586 King James VI. confirmed a charter by the deceased John bishop of Ross, perpetual 
commendator of the monastery of Lundoris, granting to Alexander Ros of Litill Terrell and 
Issobel Ros his wife and their heirs, with remainder to Alexander's heirs whomsoever, the lands 
of Newmekill extending to half a davach, and the alehouse of Newmekill with the brewlands, 
then occupied by Alexander Ros and his tenants. 6 In 1652 Hew Ross was served heir to his 
father Alexander Ros of Pitkerie in the three oxgangs of the lands of Newnakill with the teind 
sheaves, of old in the bishoprick of Ross, then in the sheriffdom of Ross, of the extent of 
6 marks of feu duty. 7 

There are villages at Invergordon (formerly Inchbreky), Bridgend, and Saltburn, containing 
respectively populations of 1000, 276, and 300. 8 

At Invergordon are held five yearly fairs, in February, April, August, October, and De 
cember. 9 

Near the church stands an erect stone or obelisk named Clach-a-mhearlich, the thief's stone 
(probably the boundary of an ancient girth). 10 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. fol. 93. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fol. 17. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. 7 Retours. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. ff. 14, 30. 8 New Stat. Ace. 
1 Retours. ' Ibid. 

5 Ibid. 10 Ibid. 



472 OEIGINES [ALNESS. 

Near Loch Achnacloich is a large cairn measuring 130 yards in circumference, and surrounded 
by a number of tumuli. 1 On Knocknavie is a cairn named Cairn-na-croiche, the cairn of the 
gallows. 2 In the parish is another cairn named Carn-nam-Fiann, and interpreted ' the cairn 
of the Fingalians.' 3 

Throughout the parish are several places composed of upright flagstones, and supposed to 
he places of sepulture, the largest of which measures 14 feet by 3. 4 



ALNESS. 
Alenes 5 Alnes 8 Alness. 7 (Map, No. 15.) 

THE general features of this parish are similar to those of Roskeen. 8 It lies chiefly between 
the rivers of Alness and Aultgrande, and is partly composed of a hilly district attaining its 
greatest height in the hill of Fyrish about 1000 feet above the level of the sea. 9 It has two 
lakes, Lochglass and Lochmuire. 10 

In the year 1227 Adam Bur the parson of Alenes, and James the vicar of that church, were 
present with others of the clergy of Ross at Kenedor in Moray on the occasion of a settlement 
between the bishops of Moray and Ross respecting the diocesan right of the churches of 
Kyntalargyn and Ardrosser. 11 There appears to be no farther notice of the church till the year 
1384, when either the church of Alnes or the bridge is stated to have been built by William Ros 
of Balnagown or by his wife the daughter of Lord Livingstone. 12 In 1528 Master Robert Schand 
was rector of Alnes. 13 In 1547 (19 October) Queen Mary presented Master John Dauidsoun, 
student of theology and regent of the college in the city of Aberdeen, to the vicarage of Alnes, 
vacant by the decease of Master Alexander Galloway. 14 In the same year (31 October) she 
granted to Master Alexander Galloway parson of Kinkell the escheat of all the goods that 
belonged to Master Alexander Galloway the vicar of Alnes. 15 At the period of the Reformation 
Master Thomas Ros (afterwards provost of Tayne and abbot of Feme) was parson of Alnes, 
and the vicar was Master John Dauidsoun ' Maister of the Peddagog of Glasgow,' apparently 

1 New Stat. Ace. 1615. Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. Circa A. D. 

- Ibid. 1640. Blaeu. 

Ibid. ' Tubernafeyne of the grett or Kemppis 7 Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Post 

men callit Fenis is ane well.' Kegist. Moraviense, A. D. 1640. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect, 
p. 457. < New Stat. Ace. 8 See p. 468. 
A. D. 1227. Regist. Moraviense, p. 82. 9 New Stat. Ace. 



6 A.U. 1528. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. viii. fol. 78. A.D. 
1547. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. sxi. fol. 50. A. D. 1561-66. 
Book of Assumptions. A. D. 1567. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 
xxxvi. ff. 22, 41. A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. 
A. D. 1584. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 14. Ante A. D. 



Regist. Moraviense, pp. 81, 82. 
2 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 

Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. viii. fol. 78. 
4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 50. 

Ibid. 



ALNESS.] PAROCHIALES. 473 

the person presented to the vicarage in 1547. 1 In 1571 Alexander Morison was exhorter, 
and in 1574 he was reader at Alnes. 2 The rector of Alnes as a prebendary of the cathedral 
of Ross had a croft in the canonry. 3 

The church appears to have always occupied the site of the present building, erected in 1780 
in the east end of the parish on the right bank of the burn of Teaninich. 4 

In 1549 Queen Mary presented Sir James Buchat or Buschart (apparently the same as 
Wischart) to the chaplainry called Towy (or Tolly) in the diocese of Ross, when it should be 
vacant by the demission of Sir Thomas Stevinsoun. 5 In 1567 she granted to John Chalmer, 
servitor to Master David Chalmer chancellor of Ross, the same chaplainry, then vacant by the 
decease of Sir Thomas Stevinstoun. 6 In 1569 King James VI. presented Finlay Mansoun to 
the chaplainry of Tolly, vacant by the decease of John Chalmer. 7 In 1622 Hugh Ross of 
Auchnacloch was served heir male to his grandfather Hugh Ross of Tollie in the lands of 
Tollie in the earldom of Ross, formerly belonging to the chaplainry of Kildermorie or Tollie 
as part of its temporality, of the extent of 13 marks 6 shillings and 8 pence, with 6s. 8d. in 
augmentation. 8 The chapel of Tollie was dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and its walls, 40 feet 
by 18, and about 4 feet thick, and its cemetery may still be seen in a small valley named 
Glenmoir or Gildermory at the head of Lochmuire. 9 Near it is Tobair-na-Muire, Mary's Well, 
anciently believed to possess healing virtues. 10 

In the cathedral church of Ross there were three chaplainries named the chaplainries of Alnes, 
one of which appears to have been founded on the lands of Fyrish or Fyres in this parish, and 
another on those of Culcragy. 11 

At the Reformation Master Thomas Ros, styled the principal parson of Alnes, stated the par 
sonage at 100 marks or 66, 13s. 4d., out of which a yearly pension of 20 marks was paid to Sir 
Andro Robertsoun. 12 Other three persons, Sir James Buschart, Master Alexander M'Kenzie, 
and John Robertsoune, called the other three portioners, had each about 36 bolls of victual 
yearly out of the same parsonage, the whole victual amounting to 6 chalders 12 bolls. 13 Master 
John Dauidsoun states the vicarage thus ' The quhilk gaiff quhen payment was maid the sowme 
of xx lib. be yeir with ane plaid with the plenassing &c. ; bot the laird of Fowlis and his freindis 
hes not lattin me gett ane penny thairof this fyve yeiris bygane.' 14 In 1571 the exhorter at 
Alnes had for his stipend 22, 4s. 5|d., the third of the parsonage, and in 1574 the reader 
had 20 marks and the kirklands. 15 

The chaplainry of Tollie, Kildermory, or Lochmuire, seems to have been of the yearly value 
given above, namely, 13 marks and a half. 16 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxvi. ff. 22, 41. Book of As- 8 Retours. 

sumptions. Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 9 Macfarlane's Geog. Collect New Stat. Ace. 

1 Register of Ministers. Book of Assignations. 10 New Stat. Ace. 

s Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 14. " See ROSEMARKIE,POS<. 

* MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. Macfarlane. New 12 Book of Assumptions. " Ibid. 

Stat. Ace. " Ibid. The vicar states the third of his vicarage at 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiii. fol. 11. 6, 13s. 4d., but makes no division of the plaid or its 

' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxvi. fol. 11. plenishing. 

7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 60. I6 Book of Assignations. ' See above. 

VOL. II. 3 O 



474 ORIGINES [ALSESB. 

The mairdom of Ferindonald extended from Dingwall to the water of Alness. 1 
Among lands from which a yearly revenue of 100 was granted by King James III. to Eliza 
beth Countess of Eoss in 1476, and confirmed by that king in 1477, were included 10 mark- 
lands of the two Queneleiches (or Quentlciches, apparently Contulichs), 10 marklands of 
Culcragy, and 10 marklands of Culmyllache. 2 In 1526 King James V. granted to Walter Innes 
of Tulchis the lands of Nethir Culmelloquhy extending in the King's rental to 46s. 8d. ; Ovir 
Culmelloquhy extending to the same sum ; the mill of Culmelloquhy, called in the King's rental 
the mill of Culcragy, with its lands and houses, extending to 3, 6s. 8d. ; and other lands in the 
earldom of Eoss, all united into the tenandry of Culmelloquhy for the yearly payment of 
26, 13s. 4d., in order to augment the King's rental by the sum of 5, 6s. 8d. 3 In 1527 King 
James appears to have renewed the grant, the grantee however paying yearly for Culmelloquhy 
6, and for the mill 4, 3s. 4d., and the dues of the other lands of the tenandry being propor 
tionally altered, in order to increase the whole rental by the sum of 6.* In 1528 the same 
king granted to the same Walter Innes the lands of Culcragy and Kirkfarbarne in the earldom of 
Eoss, and annexed them to the tenandry of Culmaloquhy. 5 In 1538 Walter Innes seems to have 
resigned the lands of the tenandry, as in that year they were again granted to him for five years 
by King James V., and including the two Culmaloquhies, the mill and alehouse of Culcragy, and 
the lands of Culcragy (apparently Culcragy in Alness and Culcragy in Contin), were let to him 
for the yearly payment of 28, 13s. 4d., two marts, and two muttons." In 1586 the half davach 
commonly called the half davach lands of Culmalochie, the lands of Culcragie, Culcragie with the 
mill, multures, and alehouse (apparently both Culcragies), the mylntoun of Culmalochie, and the 
lands of Ovirculmalochie, were included in a grant of lands in Eoss made by King James VI. to 
William Keith the master of his wardrobe ; the grantee paying yearly for the half davach lands of 
Culmalochie, the lands of Culcragie, and other lands included in the grant but not in the tenan 
dry, 7, 12s., 2 chalders bear and oatmeal, 12 capons, 16s. of bondage silver, 2 marts, 2 muttons, 
5 reek hens, and as grassum every 5 years 4, 13s. 4d. for the mill of Culcragie or Culmalochie 
with the multures 1 chalder bear, and 1 chalder oatmeal for the alehouse of Culcragie 20s. and 
the same sum as grassum for the milntoun of Culmalochie 3, the same sum as grassum, 8s. of 
bondage silver, and 1 poultry and for Ovirculmalochie 3, with 7s. of bondage silver, 1 
poultry, and 45s. 8d. as grassum. 7 In 1589 Master Hector Monro was served heir male and of 
entail to his father Eobert Monro of Fowlis the elder in the lands of Contulich Over and other 
lands in Eoss and Sutherland, of the old extent of 10. 8 In 1608 Eobert Monro was served 
heir male of entail and provision to his father Master Hector Monro in a davach of Contulich 

1 Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. Reg. Mag. Sig., 4 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 4. 

lib. xxxi. no. 581. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxix. fol. 9; vol. 5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 133. From this grant 

xlvii. fol. 94 ; vol. xlix. fol. 132 ; vol. li. fol. 89. Book of and other circumstances it appears that the lands of 

Assumptions. Retours. Culcragy here granted were not those of Culcragy in 

2 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. no. 371 ; lib. viii. no. 40. Alness, but of Culcragy in Contin. 
See KILMUIK EASTER, p. 461. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xi. fol. 75. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 7. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. See KILMUIU 
vi. fol. 34 ; vol. vii. fol. 34. EASTER, p. 465. Retours. 



ALNESS.] PAROCHIALES. 475 

Over and Nether, with the mill, pertinents, and outsets, namely, Ardachie, Auchvaiche, with the 
brewhouse and its croft, and the superiority of the chaplainry of Obstaile and its salmon fishings 
and in other lands, together of the old extent of S0. 1 In 1635 Hugh Lord Eraser of Lovat 
was served heir male to his father Symon Lord Fraser of Lovat in the barony of Foullis, in which 
the lands specified in 1608 were included. 2 

In 1490 King James IV., as tutor of his brother James Duke of Ross, granted to David Ross, 
the nephew and heir apparent of John Ross of Balnagovn, certain lands in Ross, including Cul- 
carn, Badcall, and Multowy, resigned by John Ross, and reserving the liferent to him. 3 In 1550 
Alexander Ros of Balnagown granted to William Carnecors of Colmislic the lands of Culcarne 
and others, in special warrandice of Westir Rarechy and Guiles sold by him to William Car 
necors. 4 In 1578 the lands of Culcarne were probably included in the barony of Balnagown as 
then disposed of. 5 In 1581 George Ros fear of Balnagovne sold in liferent to Marjory Campbell 
the daughter of the deceased Sir John Campbell of^ Caldcr the lands of Culcarne and others in 
the barony of Balnagowne, of which King James VI. then granted to Marjory a crown charter. 6 
In 1582 that king granted to George Ros of Balnagowin and the heirs male of his body, with 
remainder to his heirs male whomsoever, the barony of Balnagown and other lands, including 
Culthcarne, Badcall, and Multowy. 7 In 1617 Sir William Sinclair of Catbol was served heir to 
his father George Sinclair of May in the lands of Culcairne and others included in the barony of 
Balnagowne, in special warrandice of Rarichies and Cullis. 8 In 1622 Hugh Ros of Auchnacloch 
was served heir male to his grandfather Hugh Ross of Tollie in the lands of Multowy and Lealdy 
in the barony of Balnagown, of the extent of 5 marks, and in warrandice of these in the lands 
and town of Culcayrne in the same barony and of the same extent. 9 

In 1580 King James VI. confirmed a charter of John bishop of Ross, granting to Hugh Monro 
the brother german of Robert Monro of Foulis and to the male heirs of his body, with remainder 
to Robert Monro and his heirs whomsoever, the lands of Assint and Inchecultir in the diocese of 
Ross or mairdom of Farundonald. 10 In 1614 Patrick Kynnaird of that Ilk was served heir to 
his great-grandfather in the lands of Assint in the shcrift'dom of Innernes. 11 In 1616 John 
Kynnaird of that Ilk was served heir in the same lands to his father Patrick. 12 

In 1583 King James VI. confirmed a charter of John bishop of Ross pro tempore, granting to 
Robert Monro of Foulis and to the heirs male of his body, with remainder to his heirs male 
whomsoever, the lands of Kandlochglass, Balnacoule, Hauclmagall, and Bothmore, in the diocese 
of Ross called the mairdom of Farundonald. 13 In 1584 the same king confirmed a grant by 
the same bishop to Hector Monro the brother of Robert Monro of Foulis and his heirs male, 
with remainder to Robert and his heirs male whomsoever, of the lands of Kilteremore and 

1 Retours. 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 11. 

1 Ibid. 8 Retours. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xii. no. 285. 9 Ibid. 

4 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 535. Reg. Sec. Sig., lu Reg. Sec. Sig , vol. xlvii. fol. 94. 
vol. xxiv. fol. 6. " Retours. 

5 See KILMUIR EASTER, p. 463. ' 2 Ibid. 

6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. ff. 99, 105. 13 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 132. 



476 ORIGINES [ALNESS. 

Auchnacallane, and the lands of Alnas with the brew-houses, in the bishoprick of Eoss or mairdom 
of Farindonald. 1 In 1586 he granted in heritage to William Keith master of his wardrobe certain 
lands in Eoss, including the mill of Alnes with the astricted multures, and the lands of Feyris, 
the grantee paying yearly for Feyris 4, 8s. 8d., 12 bolls bear, 12 bolls oatmeal, 12 bolls oats, 
Leith measure, 4 marts, 4 muttons, 16s. of bondage silver, and 13 poultry. 2 In 1651 Jonet 
M'Ley was served heir to her father John Mackley advocate in the lands of Alnes with the 
brewhouse within the bishoprick of Koss called the mairdom of Ferindonald, formerly in the 
sheriffdom of Inverness, then in that of Eoss, of the extent of 3, 2s. 2d. feuferme. 3 In 1653 
Hew Monro of Fyres was served heir to his brother David Monro in the lands of Killermourie 
and Auchnagullan within the late bishoprick of Eoss or mairdom of Ferrendonill, and then in 
the sheriffdom of Eoss, of the extent of 4 and other dues ; and in a quarter of the town and 
lands of Fyres in the barony of Delnie and earldom of Eoss, of the extent of 3 bolls of bear 
and other dues. 4 

There is at Alness a village which lies partly within the parish of Eosskeen. 5 
There appears to have been a bridge at Alness, probably built by William Eos of Balnagown 
about the year 1384. 6 The bridge of Alnes occurs in record in 1439. 7 

At the eastern boundary of the parish there is a large stone named Clach-airidh-a-mhinister, 
the stone of the minister's shealing, and on the moor near the chapel of Gildermory are two 
large stones placed one above the other known as the Clach-nam-ban or stone of the women in 
both cases connected with local traditions. 8 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 89. s New Stat. Ace. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. 6 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 

3 Retours. 7 Cawdor Charters. 
* Ibid. 8 jj ew 



KILTEARN.] PAROCHIALES. 477 



KILTEARN. 

Keltierny l Keltyern 2 Keltyerne 3 Kilteirn 4 Kylterne 5 Kilterne 6 
Kiltarne 7 Kiltern. 8 (Map, No. 16.) 

THIS parish, now united to Lumlair, lies chiefly on the south of Lochglass and the river Ault- 
grande, terminating eastward on the shore of the Cromarty Firth, and extending on the north 
west to the borders of Lochbroom, its marches with which and with the neighbouring parishes 
are not very clearly denned. It lies partly on the northern slope of Ben Wyvis, which is 3720 
feet above the sea. The Aultgrande at one part of its course passes through a deep and narrow 
chasm of great picturesque beauty. 9 

In the year 1227 Andrew the parson of Keltierny was present at Kenedor in Moray on the 
settlement of a dispute between the bishops of Moray and Ross about the diocesan right of the 
churches of Kyntalargyn and Ardrosser. 10 In 1296 William of Kyngorn parson of the church 
of Keltyern of the county of Inernys swore fealty to King Edward I. of England. 11 In 
1487 Thomas Padesone was vicar of Kilteirn. 12 In 1539 King James V. presented Sir John 
Auchinlek to the vicarage of Kylterne, vacant by the decease of Master John Gardinar. 13 In 
1546 Queen Mary presented James Hammiltoun, the son of James Hanimiltoun of Innerwik, to 
the same vicarage, vacant through the inhability of Sir John Auchinlek, who was convicted of cer 
tain treasonable acts and of being art and part in the slaughter of the deceased David cardinal 
of Saint Andrews. 14 In 1547 the same queen presented Lancelot Hammiltoun, the son of the 
deceased James Hammiltoun of Innerwik, to the vicarage of Kilterne, vacant by the inhability 
of Sir John Auchinlek, convicted of treason, of being art and part in the slaughter of the 
cardinal, and of holding the castle of Saint Andrews against the tenor of the mandates directed 
thereanent. 15 In the same year she granted to Lancelot Hammiltoun the fruits of the vicarage, 
in her hands by the escheat of Sir John Auchinlek, who was denounced rebel and at the horn for 
the above crimes. 16 In 1548 Sir John Auchinlek had a remission for assisting Norman Leslie 

'A.D. 1227. Regist. Moraviense, p. 82. vol. xlvii. fol. 45. A. D. 1583. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 

3 A. D. 1296. Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 25. xlix. fol. 114. A.D. 1623. Retours. 

3 A. D. 1296. Ragman Rolls, p. 159. 7 A. D. 1585. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. fol. 81. 

* A. D. 1487. Acta Dom. Cone., p. 236. Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. 

6 A. D. 1539. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiii. fol. 2. 9 Old Stat. Ace. Miller's Scenes and Legends, pp. 

A.D. 1546. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx.no. 566. Reg. 168,169. 

Sec. Sig., vol. xx. fol. 39. A.D. 1547. Reg. Sec. Sig., Regist. Moraviense, p. 82. 

vol. xxi. ff. 58, 59. A. D. 1548. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ' Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 25. Ragman Rolls, p. 159. 

xxii. fol. 38. A. D. 1550. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 2 Acta Dom. Cone., p. 236. 

566. Reg. -Sec. Sig., vol. xxiii. fol. 74; vol. xxiv. fol. 3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiii. fol. 2. 

23. A. D. 1561-66. Book of Assumptions. A. D. 4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xx. fol. 39. 

1573. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 94. A. D. 1574. 5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 58. 

Book of Assignations. A.D. 1580. Reg. Sec. Sig., 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 59. 



478 ORIGINES [KILTEARN. 

Master of Rothes, James Kirkaldy of the Grange, and their accomplices, in holding the castle of 
Saint Andrews against the Queen, and for taking part with the English. 1 In 1550 Queen Mary 
presented John Sideserf to the vicarage of Kilterne, when it should be vacant by the resigna 
tion of Lancelot Hammiltoun. 2 John Saidserff continued to be vicar between the years 1561 
and 1566, at which time the parson was John Sandelandis. 3 In 1568 the reader at Kilterne 
was Angus Xeilson, and in 1574 Ferquhard Monro. 4 In 1580 King James VI. confirmed a 
grant in heritage by Master John Sandelandis rector of Kilterne to Gavin Reid carpenter in 
Innernes of the houses of the manse of Kilterne (apparently in the canonry) with the garden 
and pertinents, then occupied by Thomas Smyth. 5 In 1583 the same king confirmed a grant 
by Sir John Sadserf vicar of the parish church of Kilterne, with consent of Master Quintigern 
Monepenny dean of Ros and vicar general, and of the chapter, to the deceased John Monro 
in Kilterne and his heirs, of the lands of the vicar's croft of Kilterne, reserving to the vicar the 
manse and croft as then occupied. 6 In 1585 the same king presented Master Archibald Moncreif 
to the parsonage and vicarage of Kiltarne, vacant by the decease of Master John Sandilandis. 7 

The church, built in 1790, stands near the shore of the Cromarty Firth on the right bank of 
the burn of Skiach, apparently the site of its predecessors. 8 

In 154C Master John Monro chaplain of Balkny in the parish of Kilterne, with the consent 
of Queen Mary, the Earl of Aran, and Master Kentigern Monypenny dean and vicar general 
of Ross, his ordinary during the vacancy of the see, let to John Munro and his heirs male the 
(thurchlands of Toulise (or Tewlyis) with the brewhouse and the croft called Brewmer's-croft in the 
same parish, for the yearly payment of 5 marks 2 shillings and 8 pence and of a dozen of capons 
wont to be paid, and of 4 shillings in augmentation of the rental. 9 In 1550 Queen Mary 
confirmed the grant. 10 In 1551 she presented Sir William Monro to the chaplainry of Saint 
Monan on the lands of Balcony, vacant by the decease of Master John Monro. 11 Between 1561 
and 1566 the chaplainry of Saint Monanis was held by Mr. William Munro minister and vicar at 
Dingwall, apparently the presentee of 1551. 12 In 1573 King James VI. granted for seven years 
to Alexander Monro Donaldsoun ' for his sustentatioun at the scuillis ' the chaplainry called 
' Sanct Monanis chaplainrie ' in the parish of Kilterne and sheriffdome of Innernes, of which the 
yearly value did not exceed 8 Scots. 13 In 1577 he granted for seven years to John Monro, 
the son of William Monro in the Cannogait, the same chaplainry, vacant by the demission of 
Alexander Monro. 1 * In 1583 he granted the chaplainry with the place and chapel of the same 
for seven years to George Monro the son of the same William. 15 In 1623 Hugh Monro was 
served heir to John Monro of Urquhart his father in the kirklands of the chaplainry or bursary 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxii. fol. 38. " Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 566. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiii. fol. 74. vol. xxiv. fol. 23. 

3 Book of Assumptions. '" Ibid. 

4 Register of Ministers. Book of Assignations. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiv. fol. 67. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 45. 12 Book of Assumptions. 

6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 114. 13 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 94. 

7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. fol. 81. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliv. fol. 88. 
" Old and New Stat. Ace. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. > 5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 116. 

Blaeu. 



KILTEAKX.] PAROCHIALES. 479 

of Balconie named Tomless, with the brewhouse and croft of the same named Brabneris croft, 
of the extent of 5 marks, 6 shillings, and 8 pence feuferme. 1 

There was a chapel at Culnaskeath, and one at Wester Fowlis. 2 Blaeu gives KilmabryJ 
apparently in this parish. 3 

There was a chaplainry in the chanonry of Ross founded on the lands of Drutnmond in 
this parish.* 

In Baiamund's Roll the church of Kyltarne is taxed at 5, 6s. 8d. ; in the Libellus Taxationum 
it is valued at 53, 6s. 4d. ; and in the Taxatio Sec. xvi. it is taxed at 16, 10s. 3d. 5 At the 
Reformation the parsonage was let to the laird of Fowlis yearly for 96, 13s. 4d., ' of the quhilk,' 
says Master John Sandelandis the parson, ' I pay in pensioun to Sir Donald Sherar yeirlie the 
soume of 12, item to Johne Sandilandis sonne to the laird of St. Ninianis 42 merkis yeirlie, 
with the yeirlie dewteis alsua to the minister.' 6 The vicarage, as stated at the same period by 
Master Alexander Pedder procurator for John Saidserff the vicar, ' gaif yeirlie in assedatioun to 
the said Mr. Johne the soume of xl. merkis, and now be yeir nathing be reasoun the paroshineris 
will not pay quhill farder ordour be put to the kirk of the samin.' 7 The reader at Kilterne 
had for his stipend in 1568 and 1573 20, and in 1574 16. 

The yearly value of the chaplainries of Saint Monanis and Applecrocc, as stated at the 
Reformation, amounted together to 36 marks, the former, as we have seen, being valued at 
less than 8 Scots. 9 

The possession of the lands of Fowlis by the family of Monro is locally ascribed to a period 
previous to the date of almost any existing record. 10 Nisbet asserts that William Earl of 
Suthirland between the years 1214 and 1249 granted a charter charissimo et fiddissimo con- 
sanguineo Georgia Munro de Foulis. 11 In 1341, 1368, and between 1362 and 1372 appears 
in record Robert of Monro, and in 1398 Hugh of Monro, probably both of Foulis. 12 George 
of Monroo of Foulis appears in 1437, 1440, and 1449. 13 In 1487 John of Monroo was lord 
of Foulis. 14 He was dead in 1500, and appears to have been succeeded by his brother William. 15 
There appear in record in 1502 William Monro of Fowlis, in 1515 and 1541 Hector Monro of 
Foulis, and in 1542 Robert Monro of Foulis the son and heir of the deceased Hector. 16 In 1542 
King James V. granted to Robert Monro of Foulis the relief of the lands and other property 
belonging to his deceased father Hector, which was due to the King for giving him seisin of the 
same. 17 In 1552 Robert Monro of Fowlis sold to Margaret Ogiluy lady of Moy in liferent the 
lands of Wester Fowlis in the barony of Fowlis and sheriffdom of Innernes. 18 In 1553 Queen 



1 Retonrs. 2 Old Stat Ace. 3 Blaeu's Map. 14 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. x. no. 109. Acta Dom. Cone., 

4 SeeRosEMARKiE,pos. 5 MSS. in Adv. Lib. p. 236. 

Book of Assumptions. 7 Ibid. 15 Kilravock Charters. 

8 Register of Ministers. Book of Assignations. I6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ii. fol. 108 ; vol. xiv. ff. 80, 86 ; 

9 Book of Assignations. See above. vol. xvi. fol. 4. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xis. no. 133; lib. 
10 Old Stat. Ace. " Heraldry, vol. i. p. 343. xxvii. no. 159. 

12 Balnagown Charters. 17 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xvi. fol. 4. 

13 Charter in Northern Institution Inverness. Kilra- Is Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 122. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vock Charters. vol. xxv. fol. 48. 



480 ORIGINES [KILTEARS. 

Mary granted to Margaret Ogiluy a crown charter of the same lands. 1 In 1563 a charter is 
granted at Foulis by Robert Munro of Foulis, and is witnessed by his brother George Munro and 
by William Munro vicar of Dingwell. 2 Eobert Monro of Foulis (apparently the same person) 
appears in record in 1571, 1574, 1577, 1580, 1583, 1584, and 1589. 3 In the last named year 
Master Hector Monro was served heir male and of entail to his father Robert Monro of Fowlis 
the elder in certain lands, including the 10 davachs of Estir Fowlis, Westir Fowlis, Nether 
Catboll, and other lands not in this parish. 4 In 1608 Robert Monro was served heir male and 
of entail and provision to Master Hector Monro of Foullis his father in the lands of Eister 
Foullis and their pertinents, namely Culskea; Teachatt ; Wester Ballachladich ; Aehlich with 
the brewhouse, alehouse, smiddie, smiddiecroft, and other crofts of the same ; the pastures and 
shealings of Clearmoir, Altnagerrack, and the forest of Weyes ; the lands of Wester Foullis with 
the shealings and Arbisak ; a davach of the lands of Keatoll, with the pendicles, outsets, and 
pertinents, namely, Eister Ballachladich and the pastures and grassings of Badnagarnc. 5 In 
1635 Hugh Lord Fraser of Lovat was served heir male in the same lands to his father Symon 
Lord Fraser of Lovat. 6 It is said that the forest of Wyvis mentioned in the above services was 
held of the King on condition that the grantee should furnish a snowball on any day of the 
year if required. 7 

In the year 1455 Beatrice Countess of Ross submitted to King James II., who then granted 
to her the barony of Balknie. 8 In 1586 King James VI. granted in heritage to William Keith 
master of his wardrobe, for his good service, various lands in Ross, including Balconie with the 
alehouse and the Flukeris croft, the 'stell' of Ardroy, and the 'yair' of Balconie with the 
alehouse of the same.' 9 

In 1 584 King James VI. confirmed a charter by Master Quintigern Monypenny vicar general 
and dean of Ross, granting to Robert Monro of Foulis and his heirs the lands of Kilterne, with 
the mill, astrictcd multures, and fishings, which were formerly held by John Cokburne of Kilterne 
and Jonet Forres his wife, and were escheat to Queen Mary by reason that John Cokburne 
was born and died illegitimate without lawful heirs. 10 In 1608 Robert Monro was served heir 
male, of entail, and of provision, to his father Master Hector Monro of Foullis in the salmon 
fishing of Kilterne, and the superiority of the lands and mill of Kilterne, of the extent of 
9, 6s. 8d. n 

At Evantown there is a village (apparently the same as Drummond) with a population of 
500. 12 

Two yearly fairs are held in the parish, on the first Tuesday of June and the first Tuesday 
of December. 13 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 122. Reg. Sec. Sig., 6 Retonrs. 

vol. xxv. fol. 48. ? Old Stat. Ace. 

2 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. nn. 593, 594. Reg. Soc. s Oonicle of the Earlis of Ross. 
Sig., vol. xxxi. ff. 98, 99. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 101 ; vol. xlii. fol. 55 ; ;o Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 90. 
vol. xliv. fol. 26 ; vol. xlvii. fol. 94 ; vol. xlii. fol. 132 ; " Retours. 

vol. li. ff. 89, 90. Retours. New Stat. Ace. Old Stat. Act. 

4 Retours. Ibid. 13 Ibid. 



LUMLATR.] PAROCHIALES. 481 

Balcony Castle, of old a residence of the Earls of Boss, and named on that account Balcony 
Vic Dhonail, stands on the banks of the Skiach, and has apparently been modernised or rebuilt. 1 
In 1333 Hugh Earl of Boss, and in 1341 William Earl of Boss, date some of their charters 
at Balkenny. 2 

Near the village of Drummond there existed in the last century a grave composed of flasjs, 
7 feet long, 3 broad, and about 3^ deep, named the Priest's Sepulchre. 3 



LUMLAIR. 

Lenmelar 4 Lymnolar 5 Lumlar 6 Lymmalar 7 Limlair 8 Lymlair 9 
Lymnolair 10 Lumlair 11 Limlare. 12 (Map, No. 17.) 

THIS parish seems to have been composed of only the western and smaller portion of the present 
parish of Kiltearn, stretching from the shore of the Cromarty Firth to the foot of Ben Wyvis, 
and thus having a gradual ascent from south east to north west. 

In the year 1227 William Poer parson of Lemnelar was present at Kenedor in Moray at the 
settlement of a dispute between the bishops of Moray and Boss. 13 The church became after 
wards a prebend of the cathedral. In 1548 (21 March) Queen Mary presented John Kincaid 
to the prebend of Lymnolar in the cathedral church of Boss, when it should be vacant by the 
resignation of Master John Bellindene. 1 * In the same year (10 November) he was presented by 
the Queen to the same prebend, then vacant by the decease of Master John Bellenden. 15 At the 
Beformation Henry Kincaid was parson of Lymmalar, and seems to have still been parson in 
1584. 16 The rector of Lymnolair as prebendary had a manse and croft in the canonry of 
Boss. 17 

The church, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and in modern times known as Saint Mary's 
chapel, stood at Lumlair near the sea shore. 18 

In 1586 King James VI. granted to George Monro, the son of George Monro chancellor of 
Bos, for seven years, ' for his support in sustenyng him at the sculis,' the chaplainry of Clyne 
in the diocese of Boss and sheriffdom of Innernes. 19 

1 Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. Old Stat. Ace. lu A. D. 1584. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. fol. 60 ; vol. li. 

2 Balnagown Charters. Kilravock Charters. fol. 14. " A. D. 1584. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol.1, fol. 73. 

3 Old Stat. Ace. 2 Circa A. D. 1640. Blaeu's Map. 

4 A. D. 1227. Regist. Moraviense, p. 82. 3 Regist. Moraviense, p. 82. 

5 A. D. 1548. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 78. * Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 78. 

6 A. D. 1548. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxii. fol. 51. 5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxii. fol. 51. 

7 A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. 6 Book of Assumptions. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. ff. 

8 A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. Circa A. D. 60, 73. 

1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. * Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. ff. 60, 73; vol. li. fol. 14. 

9 A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. "> Old Stat. Ace. ls > Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fol. 54. 
VOL. II. 3 P 



482 ORIGINES [LUMLAIR. 

There was a chapel at Kilchoan, dedicated, as its name implies, to Saint Congan of 
Lochalsh. 1 

In Baiamund's Roll the church is taxed at 3, 6s. 8d. ; in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued 
at 33, 6s. 8d. 2 The parsonage, as stated by Henry Kincaid between 1561 and 1566, was 
100 marks or 66, 13s. 4d. yearly. 3 In 1574 the reader at Lymlair had for his stipend 20 marks 
and the kirklands. 4 

Between 1224 and 1231 Ferkar Earl of Ros granted in heritage to Walter of Moray the son 
of the deceased Hugh of Moray two davachs of land in Ros, namely, Clon with its pertinents, 
the grantee paying yearly to the granter a pound of pepper at the feast of Saint Martin 
(11 November), and doing to the King the forinsec service belonging to the land. 5 In 1263 
Sir Fergus of Ardrossen, for the weal of his own soul, and specially for the weal of the soul 
of the deceased Friskin of Moray lord of Duffus his overlord, granted for ever to Archebald 
bishop of Moray his land of Ros, namely, the two davachs of Clon which he held of Friskin, 
for the maintenance of two chaplains in the cathedral church of Elgyn to minister perpetually 
for the souls of all the faithful dead, to be held freely and fully according to Friskin's charter 
to him, saving the forinsec service of the King and the liferent of the lady Eufamia the mother 
of Friskin, and with the exceptive clause that Sir Fergus and his heirs should not be bound 
to warrant the land to the church." In 1264 the lady Eufemia, the widow of Sir Walter of 
Moray lord of Duffus, quitclaimed to Archebald bishop of Moray the land which she had in Ros 
in name of her dowry, namely, the third part of the whole lands of Clonys near Dyngvall, which 
formerly belonged to Sir Walter her deceased lord, for the maintenance of two chaplains to 
minister for the living and the dead in the cathedral church of Elgyn according to the charter 
of Sir Fergus of Ardrossan. 7 In 1269 William Earl of Ros confirmed to Bishop Archebald the 
same two davachs of Clon in Ros, granted by the deceased Freskin of Moray lord of Duffus, 
quitclaiming for ever the yearly revenue of a pound of pepper due from the lands, and engaging 
for himself and his heirs to perform the forinsec service due to the King. 8 Between the years 
1350 and 1372 various charters are witnessed by William of Clyne. 9 In 1375 William of Clyn, 
apparently the same person, held the lands of Cadboll in Tarbat of the bishop of Moray. 10 In 
1 584 King James VI. confirmed a charter by Sir Alexander Douglas, chaplain of the chaplainry 
of Saint [Mary] Magdalen, and Sir James Spens chaplain of the chaplainry of Saint Laurence 
in the cathedral church of Moray, granting, with consent of the bishop, canons, and chapter, to 
Robert Monro of Foulis in liferent, and to his second son Hugh Monro and his male heirs, with 
remainder to Hector Monro his other son and his male heirs, and to Robert's own male heirs 
whomsoever bearing the surname and arms of Monro, the towns and lands of Mekill and Litill 
Clynis, with the mills, salmon fishings, and other fishings in salt and fresh water, lying in the 

1 MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Old Stat. Ace. 7 Ibid., p. 278. 

- MSS. in AJv. Lib. 3 Book of Assumptions. * Ibid., pp. 278, 279. 

' Book of Assignations. 9 Balnagown Charters. 

3 Kegist. Moraviense, pp. 333, 334. 10 Kegist. Moraviense, pp. 180, 181. See TARBAT. 

6 Ibid., pp. 277, 278. pp. 44^ 442. 



LUMLAIK.] PAROCHIALES. 483 

earldom of Eoss, regality of Spynie, and sheritf'dom of Innernes. 1 In 1589 Master Hector 
Monro was served heir male and of entail to his brother gcrman Hugh Monro of Clynes in tin- 
lands and towns of Mekle Clyne and Lytill Clyne, with the mill and multures, and the salmon 
fishings, lying as above, with the power of building and cultivating, of the extent of 21, 6s. 8d. 
feuferme. 2 In 1608 Robert Monro was served heir male of entail and provision in the same lands 
to Master Hector Monro of Foulis his father. 3 

In 1557 David bishop of Ross, perpetual commendator of Cambuskynneth, with the consent of 
his dean and chapter, granted to his brother Robert Leslie the lands and baronies of [in?] Feriu- 
donald and Ardmanoch, the patrimony and property of the bishoprick, the lands in Ferindonald 
being those of Kilquhoane, for which the grantee was to pay yearly 4 marks with 17s. 9id. as 
grassum, the fourth part of a custom mart, one mutton, 6 poultry, one kid, 20 eggs or 3 pence, 
and one boll of custom oats ; paying for the whole lands as arriage and carriage, and turf or fuel, 
30s. with 13s. 4d. yearly in augmentation of the rental, and furnishing also three suits at the 
three head courts yearly held at the canonry of Ros. 4 The bishop's lands of [in ?] the mairdom of 
Ferindonald, as held by the laird of Fowlis and his brothers between the years 1561 and 1566, 
paid yearly .40, 9s. ld., 11 bolls oats, 8| marts, 25 muttons, 24 kids, 82 capons, and 69 
poultry. 5 The lands held by the Monroes appear to have been those of Pellok and Lymlair with 
the alehouse, and some lands in Alness, which were granted by John bishop of Ross to Robert 
Monro of Foulis and the heirs male of his body, with remainder to his heirs male whomsoever, 
and in 1583 were confirmed to him by King James VI. 6 In 1587 that king confirmed a charter 
by William Sinclare rector of Olrik, canon of Caithnes, and commissary of Henry bishop of Ross, 
granting the lands of Kilquhone extending to the quarter of a davach, and other lands of the 
bishoprick, to Thomas Vrquhart the son of the deceased Alexander Vrquhart sheriff of Crombathv, 
and to the heirs male of his body, with remainder to his brother german Arthur Vrquhart and 
his male heirs, to their brother german James Vrquhart and his male heirs, to their brother 
german John Vrquhart and his male heirs, and to their eldest brother Walter Vrquhart and his 
male heirs whomsoever bearing the surname and arms of Vrquhart. 7 

At Clyne is a small eminence, around which are three circles, one at the foot 80 paces in 
circumference, a second higher up 50 paces, and a third at the top 35 paces and enclosing 
two ovals formed of erect stones, each 13 feet by 10. 8 At some distance westward from the 
eminence there is a cairn about 30 paces in diameter, having a few graves composed of flags, 
one in the centre of the cairn, and the others at the circumference. 9 

1 Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 90. 5 Book of Assumptions. 

2 Eetours. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 132. 
s Ibid. 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol, 169. 

Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 581. Reg. Sec. Sig., s Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. 
vol. xxL\. fol. 9. 9 Ibid. 



484 



OKIGINES 



[DIXGWALL. 



DING WALL. 
Dyngwall ' Dingwell 2 Dingill, Dungill 8 Dingwall. 4 (Map, No. 18.) 

THIS parish occupies a small area of scarcely two miles square extending from Ben Wyvis to 
the mouth of the river Conan, the lower part being a rich plain lying chiefly between that river 
and the Pefier or Pefferay burn. 

Between the years 1350 and 1372 a charter by Hugh of Ross is witnessed by Thomas the 
clerk of Dyngwall. 5 In 1504 a charter by John bishop of Boss is witnessed by John Fresell 
rector of Dingwell. 6 In 1532 the vicar of Dingwell was Sir Alexander Rorisoun. 7 In 1547 
(November 2) Queen Mary presented Sir William Monro, the nearest of blood to the deceased 
Sir Alexander Boresoun, to the vicarage of Dingwell, then vacant by Sir Alexander's death. 8 
In the same year (6 November) she presented Master Thomas Ker to the rectory of Dingwell, 
vacant by the decease of Sir John Stevinsoun. 9 Between 1561 and 1566 William Munro 
appears as minister and vicar of Dingwell. 10 In 1569 Donald Adamsoun was exhorter at 
Dingwell and Vrray, and in 1574 Master Walter Ross was reader at Dingwell. 11 In 1579 
King James VI. presented Robert Philp to the vicarage of Dingwell, vacant by the demission of 
Donald Adamesoun. 12 In 1587 he presented William Makkynnane to the parsonage and vicarage 
of Dingwell, vacant by the decease of Master Thomas Ker last parson and Master Robert Philp 
last vicar. 13 

The present church, built in 1801, stands on the north side of the town of Dingwall. 14 About 
the year 1790 the church was ruinous, and attached to it were several chapels. 15 

In 1516 King James V. presented Sir Thomas Kemp chaplain to the chaplainry of Saint 
Laurence in the castle of Dingwell, when it should be vacant by the resignation of Sir John 
Auchtlek. ic In 1547 Queen Mary presented Sir Andrew Dow to the same chaplainry vacant by 
the decease of Sir Alexander Roresoun. 17 Between 1561 and 1566 Sir David Barquhan held the 
chaplainries 'of Sanct Lawrent and Arfaill' in the diocese of Ros. 18 In 1569 King James VI. 
presented Donald Adamsoun, ' instructar and teichar of the youth within the burch of Dingwall,' 



1 A. D. 1350-1372. Balnagown Charters. 

2 A. D. 1504. Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiv. no. 85. A. I). 
1532. Rug. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 150. A. D. 1547. 
Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. ff. 51, 52. A. D. 1563. Reg. 
Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. no. 593. A. D. 1569. Reg. Sec. 
Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 96. A. D. 1579. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vol. xlvi. fol. 62. A. D. 1587. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. 
fol. 170. Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. 

3 A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. 

4 A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. 

5 Balnagown Charters. 

6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiv. no. 85. 

7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 150. 



K Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 51. 
9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 52. 

10 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. no. 593. 
sumptions. 

11 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 96. 
signations. 

: Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvi. fol. 62. 

Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol. 170. 

New Stat. Ace. 

Old Stat. Ace. 
6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. ff. 70, 71. 
" Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 51. 
6 Book of Assumptions. 



Book of As- 
Book of As- 



DIN-GWALL.] PAROCHIALES. 485 

to the chaplainries of Saint Lawrance in Dingwall and Ardafaily in Ardmannoch, vacant by the 
decease of David Barchan. 1 In 1575 that king granted for seven years to James Dauidsoun 
the son of John Dauidsoun in Edinburgh, 'in support of his sustentatioun at the scule,' the 
chaplainry of Saint Lawrence and Ardfield in Dingwall (meaning evidently the same two 
chaplainries), vacant by the demission of Donald Adamesoun promoted to the subchantry of 
Ross. 2 In 1582, the chaplainry of ' Sanctlaurence and Ardfaill in Dingwall' being vacant by 
the expiration of the above grant, King James granted it for life to the same James Dauidsoun, 
' in respect of his continewance at his studie, in forder support of his sustentatioun at the scolis 
and intertenement vtherwayis." 3 

In Baiamund's Roll the church of Dingwell is taxed at 53s. 4d. ; in the Libellus Taxationum 
it is valued at 26, 13s. 4d. 4 At the Reformation William Monro minister and vicar at Dingill, 
states, ' And, becaus I gett nathing of the said vicarag except v merkis of twa cobillis fishing, I 
am content the Quenis Grace dispone thairon, becaus I can gett na lyf thairin without hir Grace 
caus me haue ane lyf lyk ane minister and be speciallie exercit.' 5 In 1574 Robert Monro, 
minister at Dingwell and other churches, had for his stipend 66, 13s. 4d. ; and the reader, 
Master Walter Ross, had 10. 6 In 1576 Donald Adamsoun minister had for his stipend 
102, 13s. 4d. 'with the gleib and kirkland of Urray newlie providit to him, &c.;' and Robert 
Philp (afterwards, as we have seen, presented to the vicarage) had ' the haill vicarage of Dingwell, 
vacant, 40.' 7 

The chaplainries of Sanct Lawrent and Arfaill yielded yearly 15 to the chaplain at the 
Reformation. 8 

The earldom of Ross included the modern counties of Ross and Cromarty, or the more ancient 
districts of Cromarty, Ross proper, and North Argyle, the last including Kintail, Lochalsh, Loch- 
carron, Applecross, and Garloch, perhaps also Lochbroom. 9 In a manuscript of the thirteenth or 
fourteenth century the land of Ros is said to be 24 leagues in breadth and upwards of 40 in 
length. 10 At an early period it was subject to local rulers named Maormors, of whom the first 
on record is Finlaoich, Finlach, or Finleg, the son of Ruadri, styled by the Irish annalists ' Ri 
Alban' and ' Mormaer of the sons of Croeb,' and by the Norse sagas ' Finnleikr Jarl the Scot.' u 
In the year 1020 he was slain by the sons of his brother Malbrigid. 12 His son and successor 
was Macbeatha or Macbeth, styled by Nennius ' the vigorous Macbrethach,' and by Wyntoun 
'thane of Crwmbawchty,' who became King of Scotland in 1040, and was slain in 1056. 13 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 86. Both these 6 Book of Assignations. " Ibid, 
chaplainries seem to have been dedicated to Saint 8 Book of Assumptions. Register of Ministers. 
Laurence, a circumstance which may have caused them 9 Regist. Moraviense, p. 342. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. 
to be confounded as they are in subsequent grants. p. 91. Rob. Index, p. 16, no. 17 ; p. 48, no. 1 ; p. 99 ; 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 125. p. 100, no. 1. The earldom included also the parish of 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 29. In 1586 and 1587 Kilmorack, now in the county of Inverness, 
the chaplainry of Saint Laurence in Ardefaill was 10 Misc. of Maitland Club, vol. iv. part i. p. 34. 
included in the same grant with the chaplainry of " Tigernachi Annales. Chalmers' Caledonia, vol. i. 
Dunskeyth, first to Thomas Davidsoun the brother of pp. 403, 407. Irish Version of Nennius (Irish Arch. 
James, and then to Robert Monro. Soc.), pp. Ixxvii, Ixxix. 12 Ibid. 

J MSS. in Adv. Lib. 13 Ibid. Innes's Critical Essay, pp. 791, 803. Reg. 

5 Book of Assumptions. Prior. S. Andree, p. 114. Chronica de Mailros, pp. 



486 ORIGINES [DINGWAU,. 

Macbeth apparently had no son, and has on record no successor as Maorrnor of Ross ; and we 
hear no more of the rulers of that district till about the year 1160, when King Malcolm IV. 
ordered Malcolm Earl of Bos and others to protect the monks of Dunfermelyn. 1 In 1161 
the earldom of Ross is said to have been granted to Florence Count of Holland in marriage 
with Ada the sister of the King of Scots. 2 In 1215 Machentagar or Mackinsagart (a 
person whose name signifies 'the priest's son') was knighted by King Alexander II. for his 
good service in quelling an insurrection in Moray. 3 In 1235 the same Mackiusagart appears 
as Earl of Ross, and as assisting the same king in suppressing a rising of the men of 
Galloway. 4 If these dates are correct, Machentagar the priest's son was the same as Ferchar 
or Ferquhard usually styled first Earl of Ross, who appears in that capacity from 1212 to 1252, 
and who died in the latter year. 3 William, the son and heir of Ferkar Earl of Ros, wit 
nesses a charter between 1224 and 1231, witnesses another in 1232, grants a charter as Earl 
of Ros in 1269, and is said to have died in 1274. 6 William Earl of Ros (apparently the son of 
William) appears as Earl in 1281. 7 In 1291 he swore fealty to King Edward I. 8 In 1292 the lands 
of the Earl of Ros in North Argail were by an ordinance of King John Balliol included in the 
sheriffdom of Skey. 9 In 1296 King Edward I. ordered the barons and lieges of Ergile, Nicholas 
Campbell bailie of Leghor and Ardescothyn, and William do la Haye warden of the earldom of 
Ros, and the men of that earldom, to assist Alexander Earl of Meneteth as warden of the castles 
of those lands. 10 In 1308 King Robert Bruce restored to William Earl of Ros all his lands ' with 
free forests.' 11 About the same date the marches between the earldoms of Ros and Moray are 
described as running between Glennelg and North Ergile (the latter of which belonged to the 
Earl of Ros), and thence along the boundary of Ros to the water of Forne (Beauly), and thence 
along that water to the eastern sea. 12 Earl William died in 1323, and was succeeded by his son 
Hugh, who is said to have been ' made' Earl on Saint Patrick's day of that year (17 March). 13 
In 1333 (10 May) Hugh Earl of Ross granted to his son Hugh the lands which were then in the 
hands of Margaret of Ross by reason of her terce when it should happen, except certain lands in 
Aberdeenshire reserved for William of Ross his son and heir. 1 * On Saint Magdalen's day (22 July) 
of the same year Earl Hugh was killed at the battle of Halidonhill. 15 He was succeeded by his 
son William, who appears to have been in Norway at the time of his father's death, and to have 

47, 51. From the designations 'sons of Croeb' and c Keg. Morav., pp. 89, 278, 334. Cronicle of the 

' thane of Crwmbawchty ' it is probable that the oldest Earlis of Ross. Calendar of Fearn. 

seat of the rulers of Koss was in Cromarty. 7 Keg. Morav., p. 281. 

1 Regist. de Dunfermelyn, p. 25. Ragman Rolls, p. 20. 

2 Palg. Illust., vol. i. pp. 20, 21. ' Acta Parl. Scot, vol. i., p. 91. 

3 Chronica do Mailros, p. 117. !0 Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 32. 

4 Ibid., p. 145. 11 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. p. 117. Rob. Index, p. 10. 
s Regist. Moraviense, pp. 89, 99, 101, 333. Cronicle no. 17. 

of the Earlis of Ross. This earl is represented in ' 2 Regist. Morav., pp. 342, 343. 

the ' Cronicle ' as being present in 1272 with King 13 Crouicle of the Earlis of Ross. Calendar of Fearn. 

Alexander III. at the coronation of King Edward I. 14 Balnagown Charters. 

of England, and as having there vanquished an athletic i5 Buchanani Hist., lib. ix. c. 14. Cronicle of the 

Norman called Dougall Duncansone, who ' had sic craft Earlis of Ross. The Family of Kilravock (Spalding 

in wrasling that he cuist all men that assailzeit him.' Club), p. 32. 



DINGWALL.] PAEOCHIALES. 487 

assumed the earldom only in 1336. 1 In the year 1350 Earl William, styled also lord of Sky, 
at the instance of all the nobles of the earldom of Ross, with the consent of his sister the lady 
Marjory Countess of Caithness and Orkney, and on condition that the consent of the King (David 
II.) should be obtained, appointed his brother Hugh of Ross his heir in the event of his own death 
without male issue. 2 Hugh of Ross was dead iu 1370, and in that year Earl William resigned the 
earldom of Ross and the lordship of Sky, which King David II. then granted anew to him and 
his heirs male, with remainder in succession to Sir Walter of Lesley and Eufame his wife (the 
Earl's daughter), to the male heirs of Eufame and her eldest female heir without division, and 
to Johanna the Earl's younger daughter and her male heirs or eldest female heir without division. 3 
In 1371 Earl William represented to King Robert II. that King David had given all his lands 
and tenements, and also the lands and tenements of his brother Hugh in Buchan, to Sir Walter 
of Lesly without the Earl's consent that he had been thwarted in his attempts to recover 
them that King David had taken the lands into his own hands, but had restored them to 
the Earl on his making certain concessions to Sir Walter that his daughter (Eufame) had not 
been married to Sir Walter with his consent and that he had neither given Sir Walter anv 
grant of land, nor made any agreement with him respecting the succession down to the day of 
King David's death. 4 The result of this representation is not on record, and Earl William died 
in 1372, and was succeeded in the earldom by his daughter Eufame and her husband Sir Walter 
Lesley styled Lord of Ross, who had issue, Alexander afterwards Earl of Ross, and Mary married 
to Donald Lord of the Isles. 5 Sir Walter died in 1382, and in that year or the following King 
Robert II. confirmed a grant of the earldom of Ross by Euphame Lady of Ross to Alexander 
Stewart Earl of Buchau (whom she married). 6 In 1384 and 1387 the same Alexander appears 
as Earl of Buchan and Lord of Ross and of Badenach. 7 A separation having taken place 
between him and his wife Eufame the Countess, the matter was referred to ecclesiastical arbi 
tration, and in 1389 was determined as follows by Alexander bishop of Moray and Alexander 
bishop of Ross That the Countess of Ross and her possessions should be restored to the Earl 
of Buchan as to her husband, and that she should be treated with all conjugal affection and 
receive every right becoming her state that Mariot the daughter of Athyn should be removed 
that the Earl should not again put away Eufame and that, whereas the Countess alleged 
that she was in fear of her life and of injury to her men (homines nativf), her nobles, and others, 
the Earl should find the security of noble and well known persons and engage under a penalty 
of two hundred pounds that he would treat the Countess honourably in all things and without 
putting her in fear of her life, and not stint her nativi, nobles, and others, in any way 
contrary to common law. 8 The Earl became bound according to the sentence of the bishops, 
and with the consent of the parties gave as his sureties for its fulfilment Robert Earl of 

1 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 4 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 

* Balnagown Charters. Cronicle of the Earlis of b Ibid. Calendar of Fearn. Douglas's Peerage. 
Ross. s Ibid. Kob. Index, p. 124, no. 20. 

3 Balnagown Charters. Aeta Parl. Scot., vol. i. 7 Baluagown Charters. Regist. Jloraviense, p. 

pp. 177, 178. Rob. Index, p. 53, no. 20; p. 90, no. 196. 
258. 6 Regist. Moraviense, p. 353. 



488 OEIGINES [DINGWALL. 

Suthirland, Alexander de Moravia lord of Culbyn, and Thomas of Chesholme. 1 In 1394 (10 
May) Alexander of Lesly (the son of Sir Walter by the Countess Eufame) appears as heir of 
Ross. 2 His mother was alive on 8 August 1394, but was dead before 13 August 1398, 
and he then appears as Earl of Ross. 8 He died in 1402, and was succeeded by his daughter 
Eufame as Countess of Ross. 4 Her title to the earldom was disputed by Donald Lord of the 
Isles, the husband of her aunt Mary the daughter of Sir Walter Lesley and the former Countess 
Eufame, a claim which led to the battle of Harlaw in 1411, when Donald was defeated by 
Alexander Earl of Mar. 5 In 1415 Euphame Leslie Countess of Ross resigned the earldom, 
which the Regent Albany her grandfather then granted to her anew, with remainder to his son 
John Stewart Earl of Buchan, and to John's brother Robert Stewart, and to their heirs male 
respectively, whom failing, to revert to the crown. 6 The countess Eufame is said to have 
become a nun, and the Earl of Buchan was thenceforth acknowledged as Earl of Ross till his 
death in 1424. 7 It appears however that Mary Lesley had continued to claim the earldom, 
as in 1420 she styles herself ' Dame Mary of the He lady of the Ylis and of Rosse.' 8 In 1427 
her son Alexander of Yle Lord of the Isles adopts the additional style Master of Ross. 9 In 
the same year both were apprehended as rebels ; in 1429 (in which year the lady Mary appears 
to have died) the Lord of the Isles was set at liberty, but afterwards rebelled, and in 1431 
submitted to King James I., by whom he was imprisoned in the castle of Temptalone. 10 Till 
that period the claim of the lady Mary and her son to the earldom of Ross seems not to have 
been admitted, as the King in that year continued to hold the ward of the earldom since the 
death of John Stewart. 11 Alexander of He however was afterwards undoubted Earl of Ross, 
in 1443 was justieiar north of the river Forth, and died in 1449. 12 At that time and for nearly 
30 years afterwards flourished Sir Donald Balloch of Isla, erroneously styled by some Lord of 
the Isles and Earl of Ross. 13 Alexander of He was in 1449 succeeded as Earl of Ross by John of 
Yle, his son by Elizabeth the daughter of Alexander Seton Lord of Gordon and Huntly. 14 This 
John of Yle, Lord of the Isles and Earl of Ross, was the chief party on the side of the Scotch 
in the treaty of Ardtornish concluded in 1462 with King Edward IV. of England. 15 In 1475 he 
was attainted for treason, and in 1476, on his resignation of all his lands, King James III. restored 
them to him, with certain exceptions, including the earldom of Ross, which was perpetually 
annexed to the crown. 16 In 1476 the same king granted to Elizabeth Countess of Ross, the 

' Regist. Moraviense, p. 354. '" Ext. e var. Cron. Scocie, pp. 231, 232. Cronicle of 

2 Ibid., p. 355. the Earlis of Ross. Gregory, pp. 35-37. 

J Balnagown Charters. Kilravock Charters. Rob. " Kilravock Charters. 
Index, p. 146, no. 29. 12 Gregory, pp. 39, 40. Kilravock Charters, Cawdor 

1 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. Calendar of Fearn. Charters, Charter in Northern Institution (Inverness), 

liob. Index, p. 159, no. 9. and other writs of the period. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. 

5 Ford. Scot, lib. xv. c. 21. Buch. Hist., lib. x.c. 24. no. 345. Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 
Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. Gregory, pp. 30-32. 13 Gregory, p. 62. Crouicle of the Earlis of Ross. 

s Rob. Index, pp. 159, 160, no. 9. Douglas's Peerage, Godscroft. Pennant. See KILBRIDE, p. 117. 
vol. ii. p. 415. 1J Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiii. no. 186. Gregory, p. 40. 

" Kilravock Charters. Douglas's Peerage, vol. ii. 15 See MORVERN, p. 193. 

p. 415. Gregory, p. 33. 16 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii., pp. 109, 110, 111, 113, 189, 

" Regist. Moraviense, p. 475. 190. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. no. 335. See KILARROW, 

1J Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiii. no. 18S. pp. 263, 264. 



DINGWALL.] PAROCHIALES. 489 

wife of John of Yle, for her honourable maintenance certain lands in Eoss which she had in con 
junct infeftment with her husband before his forfeiture, and in addition 100 of land and yearly 
revenue within the earldom on account of her gratuitous services to the King's father and his con 
sort, and because she had taken no part with her husband in his rebellion. 1 In 1477 the King on 
attaining his majority confirmed the grant. 2 In 1481 he granted in heritage to his second son 
James Marquis of Ormond the lands of the earldom of Eosse and the castle of Dingwale, forfeited 
by John Lord of the Isles and Earl of Eosse ; and in 1488 he created him Duke of Eoss. 3 
In 1490 (4 November) King James IV., as tutor to his brother James Duke of Eos, brought an 
action before the Lords of Council against William Keth, the son and heir apparent of Sir Gilbert 
Keth of Innerrwgy, as bailie of Elizabeth Countess of Eos, for the ' wrangwis intromettlng and 
withhalding fra our Souerane Lord as tutour forsaid of a parte of the malez of the lands of 
Fingask of the termes of Witsonday and Mertymes bipast.'* William of Keth, being summoned 
to produce his warrant, failed to appear, and a charter under the seal of the deceased Alexander 
of the His Earl of Eoss, showing that the lands of Fyngask were a tenandry of the earldom, 
was produced on behalf of the King. 5 The Lords ordained that William of Keth did wrong in 
intromitting with the mails and profits of the lands, that he should thenceforth cease from so 
doing, and that he should pay to the King the mails and profits for the terms in question in 
so far as the King could prove them due for which proof they assigned to the King's advocates 
the third day of March following (3 March 1491). 6 A litigation which lasted from 1484 to 
1494 between Elizabeth Countess of Eoss and James of Dunbar of Cumnok the tenant of her 
lands of Eoss has been already detailed. 7 About the year 1503 James Duke of Eoss resigned 
the earldom. 8 In 1524 King James V. granted the earldom of Eos and lordship of Ard- 
mannach to James Earl of Murray (his natural brother). 9 In 1565 (May 15) Queen Mary 
granted the earldom to Henry Stewart Lord Darnley, to whom she was married on 29 July 
following. 10 

The lordship of Dingwall (apparently the same as the lordship of Eoss) appears in record in 
1263. In that year Ealph de Lasceles and others, deputies (attornatf) of Alexander Gumming 
Earl of Buchan and bailie of Dignewall, declined giving an account of the bailiary on the ground 
that they were uncertain of the amount of its fermes as testified by the chapel roll, and therefore 
the account remained incomplete (indefinitum). n In the same year Alexander Earl of Buchan 
appears as sheriff of Digneuall. 12 In 1308 King Eobert Bruce granted to William Earl of Eoss 
the lands of Dingwal with the castle and town, a grant which he seems to have confirmed in 1321 or 
1322. 13 In 1382 or 1383 Euphame lady of Eoss resigned the thanedom and castle of Dingwall, 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. no. 371. Acta Parl. Scot., 8 Additional Sutherland Case, chap. iv. p. 58. 
vol. ii. p. 113. g Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. vii. fol. 92. 

2 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. viii. no. 40. 10 Additional Sutherland Case, chap. iv. p. 46. Buch. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. ix. nn. 43, 60. Additional Hist., lib. xvii. chap. 49. 
Sutherland Case, chap. iv. p. 57. " Compota Camerar., vol. i. p. 30*. 

1 Acta Dom. Cone., p. 161. a Ibid., p. 41*. 

s Ibid. 6 Ibid. I3 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. p. 117. Rob. Index., p. 15, 
See TARBAT, pp. 443, 444. no. 17 ; p. 16, no. 4. 

VOL. II. 3 Q 



490 ORIGINES [DINGWALL. 

which King Kobert II. then granted to her and to her husband Alexander Stewart Earl of Buchan 
his son. 1 In 1455 the barony of Eddirdaill called Ardmanache, and the Redcastell with the lord 
ships of Ros belonging to it (including apparently the lordship of Eos or Dingwall), were annexed 
to the crown. 2 In 1500 King James IV. appointed Audro bishop of Cathnes for 9 years cham 
berlain and captain of the lands and lordships of Ross and Ardmannach. 3 In 1507 (22 March) 
he appointed that bishop and another person his chamberlains and bailies of the lands and lord 
ships of Ross and Ardmanach, and captains and keepers of the castles of Dingvile in Ross and 
Redecastle in Ardmanach, with all their fees and pertinents. 4 In the same year and month 
(23 March) he appointed the same bishop for nine years his chamberlain and bailie of all the 
King's proper lands and lordships of Ross and Ardmannaeh, and keeper of the same castles, assign 
ing to him for those offices all his ' manys laundis,' profits, and dues, as others had before him. 5 
In the same year (13 April) the same king commissioned Andro bishop of Cathnes and others to 
examine the infeftments of the tenants and inhabitants of the lordships of Dingwell and Ardman 
nach, and, if any should be found to occupy lands not contained in their infeftments, to send to 
the King copies of the infeftments under the seal of the commissioners, that the offenders might 
be punished. 6 In the same year (22 April) King James granted to the same bishop for three 
years the fishings on the water of Conane, and all his other fishings in the lordships of Ross and 
Ardmannach, for the yearly payment of four lasts of salmon ' full, rede, and suete,' and 2000 
' keling' (cod) sufficient merchandise, to be delivered free on the shore of Leith, the King paying 
the ' aventure' of the same and the freight from Dignwell to Leith. 7 On 6 May of the same year 
the King commissioned Bishop Andro to let for five years all the lands in the lordships of Ross 
and Ardmannach formerly belonging to Elizabeth Countess of Ross, except the lands of Tarbat, 
to those by whom they were held or other sufficient tenants. 8 In 1511 the same king granted to 
the same bishop, then his treasurer, ' for grete sovmes of money gevin be him to the Kingis 
Hienes, and vthir grete seruice and expens maid to his plesour,' for two terms of nine years, not 
withstanding any act of parliament or other deed to the contrary, the lands and lordships of Ros 
and Ardmannach, with the woods, forests, waters, lochs, yairs, and fishings, both fresh and salt, 
with the power either to occupy the lands or to let them to others, with the power also of bailie 
and of holding courts, for payment of the dues specified in the King's rental, and without the 
usual grassum, which the King granted to the bishop for the repairing or building of the castles 
of Dingwell and Reidcastell, ' putin and kepin of gude reule in the said landis, danting of wild 
peple, with diners vtheris costis and charges,' to be held till 1000 should be paid to him on one 
day by any of the King's successors who might desire possession of the same. 9 In 15G1 Queen 
Mary granted during her pleasure to George Monro of Dawcarty the bailiary and chamberlain- 
ship of her lands and lordships of Ros and Ardmannauch. 10 In 1568 King James VI. appointed 

i Hob. Index, p. 124, no. 25. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 106. See TAIN, p. 482. 

3 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. p. 42. ; Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 107. 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 82. 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 108. 

4 Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 118. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iv. ff. 158, 159. 
J Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 106. 10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxi. fol. 4. 



DIN-GWALL.] PAROCHIALES. 491 

the same George to the same offices during the will of the King and the Regent. 1 In 1567 
the same king granted for three years from 1 December of that year to Thomas Murray, the 
brother german of David Murray of Cars, a lease of his salmon fishing on the water of Conan, 
belonging to the King as part of the patrimony of the crown ; ordering the Lords of Council, 
Session, and Exchequer to address letters to the chamberlain of Eos and the tenants of the lands 
of the earldom of Eos and lordship of Ardmanoch, and to all others concerned, to obey Thomas 
Murray ' in inputting of the cruvis vpoun the said wattir and vther seruice aucht be thame to 
the said fischeing in conuenient and dew tyme of yeir according to vse and wount,' the grantee 
paying yearly the sum of 133, 6s. 8d. Scots. 2 In 1584 (3 February) King James granted 
the fishings on the Connan to Colin M'Kainzie of Kintaill for five years from the feast 
of Andermes (30 November) 1585, for the yearly payment of 200 marks Scots at the usual 
terms. 3 In the same year (5 March) he granted certain lands and the fishings of Connan to Sir 
Andrew Keith of Svessa (or Fressa), as the near relation of Marischal Earl of Keith (Keith Earl 
Marischal), and to the heirs male of his body, with remainder to his heirs male whomsoever bear 
ing the surname of Keith and the arms of the principal house or messuage of the earldom of 
Merschall called Dynnotter, the grantee paying yearly for the fishings 133 as fermes, feufermes. 
dues, and services. 4 In the same year and month (18 March) he granted to the same Sir 
Andrew, of the most ancient and noble family of George Earl Mareschal, for many services both 
at home and abroad, the castle of Dingwall with the houses, buildings, and wards of the same 
the superiority of the town of Dingwall with the burgh fermes the demesne lands commonly 
called Kynnairdie the lands of Glakkis, which were the fourth part of the same demesne lands 
and the lands of Dalmaloak (contained in the previous grant) united into one free lordship 
and barony, to be called the lordship of Dingwall ; Sir Andrew and his heirs to have the style 
Lords and Barons of Dingwall and a seat in parliament ; the castle to be the chief messuage ; 
and the grantee to pay one penny of silver yearly on the feast of Pentecost for the castle, the 
town, the burgh fermes, and the lands of Kynnairdie and Glakkis. 5 In 1587, on attaining his 
majority, King James renewed the grant. 6 

In the year 1342 a charter by William Earl of Eoss is witnessed by John Yong of Dyngvale ; 
and between 1350 and 1372 a charter by the same earl is witnessed by John called Yong and 
Thomas his brother. 7 In 1350, 1368, and 1370 there appears in record Thomas of Dyngwale, 
and in the last named year also Master William of Dyngevale, probably the same who in 
1389 appears as dean of Eoss. 8 In 1451 we have. as witness to a charter Thomas of Dyng 
vale canon. 9 In 1463 John of Yle, Earl of Ross and Lord of the Isles, granted certain lands to 
Thomas the younger of Dingvale, with remainder to his brother John of Dingvale and his heirs, 
and to the better and more worthy successor of their relatives of the name of Dinguale, 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxvii. fol. 29. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig.,vol.lv.fol.l71. The lands of the lord - 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. fol. 108. ship and barony of Dingwall lay partly in other parishes. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. fol. 58. Seepost. ' Rob. Index, p.lOO.no.l. BalnagownCharters. 
* Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. ff. 87, 88. 8 Balnagown Charters. Kegist. Moraviense, p. 354. 
5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. ff. 98, 99. 9 Balnagown Charters. 



492 ORIGINES [DINGWALL. 

with reservation of the franktenement to Sir Thomas of Dinguale the Earl's chamberlain 
(probably the canon of 1451). 1 In 1464 King James III. confirmed the grant. 2 From some 
of these Dingwalls were descended the family who afterwards held the lands of Kildun near 
Dingwall, one of whom, Thomas Dingwell of Kildon, appears in record in 1506 and 1507. 3 
In 1526, in which year appear Donald and William Dingwell (probably burgesses of the 
town), the lands of Kildun, marching with those of the burgh of Dingwall, formed a separate 
lordship. 4 In 1527 King James V. granted certain lands near Dingwall and elsewhere 
to William Dingvale of Kildun. 5 In the same year he granted to Sir John Dingwall, provost 
of the Trinity College beside Edinburgh (perhaps the same who in 1524 appears as arch 
deacon of Caithness), the ward of all the lands and rents that belonged to the deceased William 
Dingwall of Kildone. 6 In 1541, 1543, 1544, 1552, 1554, and 1556 there appears in record 
Thomas Dingwell of Kildun, a charter by whom in 1541 is witnessed by Thomas Dingwell bur 
gess of Dingwell, and who in 1543 grants a charter at Kildone. 7 Thomas Dingwell of Kildun 
was dead in 1573, and John Dingwell of Kildun his son and heir appears in record in 1575. 8 In 
1583 John Dingwall of Kildun sold to Colin M'Kainzie of Kintaill some of the lands granted to 
Thomas the younger of Dingvale in 1463. 9 

Among the lands granted by King James III. in 1476 for the maintenance of Elizabeth 
Countess of Ross, and confirmed to her by that king in 1477, were the lands of Davachcarne. 10 
In 1542 King James V. granted to Duncan Bayne (along with the lands of Tulche and others) 
the astricted multures and suckin of the lands of Dunglust, the four Glakkis, Mekle Kynnardy, 
Litil Kynnardy, Westir Dryne, and Dawachcarne. 11 In the same year he granted the lands of 
Dawachcarne and others in the lordship of Boss to James Fraser the brother of Hugh Lord 
Fraser of Lovet, Davachcarne extending in the King's rental to 8, 4s. 4d. in ferme and grassum, 
16s. in bondage silver, and 6 reek hens. 13 In 1584 King James VI. granted to Sir Andrew 
Keith in heritage, with remainder as in the case of the fishings of Conan, the lands of Drumglust, 
for yearly payment of 6, 18s. 8d., 1 chalder 2 bolls bear. 1 chalder 2 bolls oatmeal, 1 chalder 
2 bolls oats, 6 marts, 6 muttons, 24 shillings of bondage silver, and 13 reek hens. 13 In 1600 
Duncane Bane of Tullich was served heir to his father Alexander Bane of Tullich in the astricted 
multures and suckin granted to Duncan Bayne in 1542, which together with those of some other 
lands were of the extent of 10, 16s. 14 In 1619 Colin lord of Kintail was served heir male to his 
grandfather Colin Makkeinzie of Kyntail in the demesne lands called the Maynes of Kynnairdie, 

1 Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. vi. no. 17. fol. 93 ; vol. xviii. fol. 34; vol. xxiv. Col. 121 ; vol. xxvi. 

2 Ibid. ff. 64, 69; vol. xxvii. Ibl. 87; vol. xxxviii. fol. 2. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig, lib. xiv. no. 263. Reg. Sec. Sig., 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. fol. 1. 
vol. iii. ff. 81, 122. 9 Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 72. 

4 Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxiii. no. 07- Sec post. w See above, pp. 488, 489. 

5 Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 36. Keg. Sec. Sig. " Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 306. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vol. vi. Col. 53 ; vol. vii. fol. 57. vol. xvi. fol. 38. For a notice of the lands of Easter 

6 Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. vii. ff. 65, 104. Drynie see KINNETTES;>OS*. 

7 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvii. no. 159; lib. xxix. nn. 12 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 365. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
!I3, 205; lib. xxxi. no. 269; lib. xxxii. no. 211. Reg. vol. xvi. fol. 87. 

Sec. Sig., vol. xv. ff. 9, 38; vol. xvi. fol. 36 ; vol. xvii. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. ff. 87, 88. See above, p. 491. 

14 Retours. 



DINGWAU,.] PAROCHIALES. 493 

the ward called the ward of Dinguall, of the extent of 1 chalder 2 bolls of meal and other dues ; 
the lands of Glakkis, being the fourth part of the said lands of Maynes, of the extent of 1 chalder 
12 bolls of meal and other dues ; the lands of Drumglust, of the extent of 6, 18s. 8d. ; and 
other lands, all included in the lordship and barony of Dinguall. 1 

In 1507 King James IV. granted to Andro bishop of Caithnes the ward of a mark's worth of 
land of old extent of the Tulloch in the lordship of Boss, which was in the King's hands by the 
decease of Ferquhar Ouresoun. 2 In 1542 King James V. granted to Duncan Bayne the lands of 
Tulch and others in the earldom of Ross, for the yearly payment of 18, 4s., 4 bolls of bear and 
meal, 1 mart, and 2 reek hens, to augment the rental by 20 shillings. 3 Duncan Bayne of Tulch 
appears in record in 1553, 1554, 1555, and 1556.* Alexander Bane of Tullich (apparently the 
son of Duncan) appears in 1563, 1579, 1581, 1600, 1607, and 1611, and was dead in 1624. 5 
In 1600 Duncan Bane of Tullich was served heir to his father Alexander in the lands of Tullich 
of the extent of 3 marks and other dues, and in other lands, extending in all to 18, 4s. e In 
1611 Duncan Baine of Tulliche appears as heir to his grandfather Duncan and his father 
Alexander. 7 In 1635 we have Alexander Bayne the heir male and of provision of his father 
Duncan Bayne of Tullich. 8 

In 1541, 1542. 1543, 1553, 1554, 1555, 1556, 1561, 1567, and 1568 George Monro of 
Dalcarty or Davachcarty appears in record, and in the year 1579 he was dead. 9 In 1553 he sold 
the lands of Dawachcarty to Duncan Bane of Tulch, and in the same year Queen Mary granted to 
the latter a crown charter of the lands, and to the former a letter of reversion to the same. 10 
In 1555 George Monro of Dawachcarty sold to Donald Makaneroy the fourth part of his lands of 
Dawachcarty, then occupied by John Maklauchlane M'Gilley and John Makferquhair M'Gille- 
bane, and in 1556 Queen Mary granted to Donald Makaneroy a crown charter of the lands. 11 
In 1561 that queen appointed George Monro of Dawcarty during her pleasure bailie and cham 
berlain of her lands and lordships of Eos and Ardmannauch. 12 In 1567 she exempted him for 
life on account of his age from all service as a soldier, from sitting on assizes, and from appearing 
as a witness in any court. 13 In 1568 the same George was appointed bailie and chamberlain of 
the same lands and lordships as in 1561 during the will of King James VI. and his Regent. 11 
In the same year King James granted to Donald Roy and his heirs a crown charter of the half 
of the east quarter of the lands of Dalchartie, namely, an oxgang then occupied by Moriacli 

1 Retonrs. * Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvii. no. 159; lib. xxxi. nn. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 106. 205, 267. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiv. ff. 80, 81 ; vol. xv. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 306. Reg. Sec. Sig., fol. 9; vol. xvi. fol. 36; vol. xviii. ff. 14, 15 ; vol. xxvi. 
vol. xvi. fol. 36. ff. 21, 64, 69 ; vol. xxvii. fol. 137 ; vol. xxxi. fol. 4 ; vol. 

4 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. nn. 205, 269 ; lib. xxxii. xxxvi. fol. 25; vol. xxxvii. ff. 29, 35; vol. xxxviii. ff. 16, 
no. 211. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxvi. fol. 21 ; vol. xxviii. 109, 110 ; vol. xlv. fol. 106 ; vol. xlvi. fol. 95. 

fol. 2. I0 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 205. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. nn. 593, 594. Reg. Sec. vol. xxvi. fol. 21. 

Sig., vol. xxxi. ff. 98, 99 ; vol. xlv. ff. 106, 107 ; vol. xlvii. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 267. Reg. Sec. Sig... 
fol. 88. Retours. vol. xxvii. fol. 137. 

6 Retonrs. 12 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxi. fol. 4. 

? Ibid. a Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxvi. fol. 25. 

Ibid. ' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxvii. fol. 29. 



494 ORIGIN ES [DIXGWALI,. 

Makdonald Makwilliame M'Kay, and an oxgang of the west quarter of the same lands then oc 
cupied by Gillepatrick Makdonald Roy, both sold to Donald Boy by George Monro of Dalchartie, 
to whom in the same year the King granted a letter of reversion to the lands. 1 In 1579 the 
same king granted in heritage to Alexander Bane of Tullich and Agnes Fraser his wife, with 
remainder to the heirs of Alexander, a crown charter of half the lands of Dalcarthie in the 
lordship and earldom of Bos, then occupied by Donald Makaneroy and his tenants and others, 
and sold to Alexander Bane and his wife by Andrew Monro of Newmoir the son and heir of the 
deceased George Monro formerly of Dalcarthie. 2 In 1581 the same king granted in heritage to 
Alexander Bayne of Tullich the nouentry and other dues of half the lands of Daacartie, then 
occupied by Donald Monro and his cottars, tenants, and servants, and in the King's hands since 
the decease of George Monro of Daacartie or last lawful possessor. 3 In 1611 Duncan Baine of 
Tullichc was served heir to his father Alexander and to his grandfather Duncan Baine of 
Tulliche in half the lands of Dawachcartye, of the old extent of 23s. 4d.* 

In the year 1227 King Alexander II. erected a royal burgh ' at Dingwell in Bos,' and granted 
to the burgesses all the liberties and free customs which the burgesses of Invernes had. 5 He 
appointed a weekly market to be held in the burgh every Monday, and granted to the burgesses 
that persons coming to the burgh and settling in it should be leer secum for ten years from the 
feast of Saint Martin (11 November) of the year 1226, and that they should be for ever free from 
toll and every other custom exigible for their cattle throughout the land. 6 He granted also his 
peace to all who should come to dwell in the burgh, and commanded that all resorting thither to 
sell or buy should have his peace, should traffic there, and return thence in peace, saving the 
rights of the burgh. 7 In 1296 the Knights Templars and the Knights of the Hospital of Saint 
John of Jerusalem had property in the town of Dynguale, which the sheriff of Dynguale was 
ordered to restore to them on the Masters having sworn fealty to King Edward I. 8 In 1308 
King Bobert Bruce granted to William Earl of Boss the burgh of Dingwall and its liberties 
a grant which in 1321 or 1322 he seems to have confirmed. 9 In 1475 John Earl of Boss and 
Lord of the Isles before his forfeiture was summoned by the Unicorn Pursuivant as sheriff of In- 
nernes, among other places at the market cross of the burgh of Dingvale, to appear in parliament 
and answer for certain crimes. 10 In 1498 King James IV., on the narrative that the privileges of 
his burgh of Dingwell had gone into desuetude through the insults of war and the depopulation 
of the country to the great loss and grievance of the same, confirmed its erection and the privi 
leges granted by King Alexander II. ; and granted moreover to the burgesses and inhabitants the 
power of electing yearly an alderman and bailies, of making guild brothers, and generally of 
enjoying all the privileges held by the burgh of Innernes, saving the rights formerly due to the 



1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxvii. fol. 35. ^ Ibid. Dingwell is said to mean Thingavollr, the 

- Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 106. upper thing or judgement place. Worsaae, p. 259. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 88. s Eotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 25. 

4 Retours. 9 Rob. Index, p. 15, no. 17; p. 16, no. 4. See above, 
1 Burgh Charters. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiii. no. 295. p. 489. 

' ; Ibid. 10 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. pp. 110, 111. 



DINGWALL.] PAROCHIALES. 495 

King by the burgh and burgesses of Dingwell. 1 In 1503 a sheriff appointed by the Scotch par 
liament to be made and called the sheriff of Ross was to sit in Thane or Dingwale as the case 
required, and the justices depute and sheriffs for the North Isles were by the same authority 
appointed to sit in Innernes or Dingwale. 2 In 1505 King James IV. granted to Andro Aytoun, 
captain of the castle of Striueling, the customs of all the burghs between Banf and Orknay, including 
Dingwell, for the yearly payment of 50 to the King's comptroller and others. 3 In 1507 the 
burgesses and community of Dingwell were as tenants of the lordship included among those whose 
infeftments Andro bishop of Cathnes and others were commissioned to examine. 4 In the same 
year Dingwell was the port at which the salmon due by that bishop to King James IV. for the 
fishings on Conane were shipped for Leith. 5 In the same year John Mowat of Loscragy and 
Freswick granted to his brother Alexander Mowat, under reversion to himself and his heirs, 
certain lands in the lordship of Ross, and his tofts and crofts in the burgh of Dingwell, the 
grantee giving the forinsec service to the King and a penny sterling yearly to the granter. 6 In 
1508 King James IV. confirmed the grant. 7 In 1509 that king appointed Alexander Earl of 
Huntlie sheriff of the whole sheriffdom of Innernys, with the power of sitting daily when neces 
sary in the towns of Tane and Dingwell for the bounds of Ross. 8 In 1526 King James V. 
granted to Walter Innes of Tulchis seven roods of land in Petglasse on the south side of the lands 
of Donald Dingwell half an acre in Petglasse between the lands of William Dingwell on the 
south and the lands called Blakcarisland on the north an acre lying at the Gray Stane between 
the lands of Patrik Kempt on the west and of John Nicholsoun on the east a piece of land near 
the mill of Brigend called Schortaker between the public street and the mill on the east and the 
march of Fesallich on the west a piece of land between the water of Peferay on the north and 
the lands of the lordship of Kildun on the south a rood of land in Thorn bane between the 
lands of William Candich on the west and the lands of William Makmularon the south (east?) 
and an acre of land in the field of Acris-Scotte between the lands of the lordship of Kildun on 
the south and the lauds of John Vaus on the north all within the territory of the burgh of 
Dingwell, and in the King's hands as escheat by the decease of John Makanedoy in Dauchauch- 
polo who died without lawful heirs. 9 In 1541 a charter of Thomas Dingwell of Kildun is wit 
nessed by Thomas Dingwell burgess of Dingwell. 10 In 1543 and 1555 charters by the same 
Thomas Dingwell of Kildun are given at Dingwell (apparently the town). 11 In 1545 Queen Mary 
appointed Master Thomas Marioribanks, burgess of Edinburgh, custumar (apparently of the 
burghs) within all the bounds of Ros and neighbouring parts. 12 In 1556 a charter is witnessed 
bv Donald Makgillewan burgess of Dingwall. 13 In 1563 Alexander Bane of Tullich granted to 

i Burgh Charters. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiii. no. 295. " Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xv. no. 63. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 

* Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. pp. 241, 249. iii. fol. 204. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 30. 9 Reg. Mag. Sig , lib. xxiii. no. 67. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

4 See above, p. 490. vol. viii. fol. 84. 

5 ibid. '" Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvii. no. 159. 

6 Reg. Mag Sig., lib. xv. no. 16. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. " Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxix. no. 93 ; lib. \xxi. no. 269. 
iii fol 193 " Reg- Sec - s 'K-> vo1 - xix - fo1 - 2a 

7 ibid I3 Reg- Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 358. 



49(5 



ORIGINES 



[DINGWALL. 



Robert Monro of Foulis certain lands in Sutherland in exchange for lands in Eoss and for infeft- 
raimt in his arable lands in the burgh of Dingwell. 1 His charter, given at Foulis, is witnessed 
by Donald Kemp burgess of Dingwell. 2 In 1584 King James VI. granted to Sir Andrew Keith 
of Svessa (or Fressa) the superiority of the town of Dingwall with the burgh fermes, included 
in the lordship or barony of Dingwall. 3 In 1587 he confirmed the privileges of the burgh as 
granted by King Alexander II. and King James IV. 4 In 1655 Sir George M'Keinzie of Tarbit 
was served heir male to his father Sir George in various lands and baronies, and among these the 
Boig of Dingwall within the burgh thereof called Boigmoir, including the bogs called Boigmore 
or Westerboig, the Midboig, and the Eister Boig, within the parish of Dingwall, of the extent of 
6. 5 Some circumstances existing in the end of the last century, such as the cross standing at 
the east end of the burgh, and a street 200 yards long running to the north east, seemed to 
indicate that the town was formerly of greater extent. 6 

At Dingwall are held three yearly fairs. 7 

In 1292 William of Braytoft, keeper of the castles of Invernesse and Dingual, was ordered by 
King Edward I. to deliver them to King John Balliol. 8 In 1308, as we have seen, King Robert 
Bruce granted the castle of Dinguall with the lands to William Earl of Ross, and in 1321 or 
1322 he confirmed the grant. 9 In 1350, 1356, and 1370 William Earl of Ross (the grandson 
of the former) gives charters at Dingual (apparently the castle of Dingwall). 10 In 1382 or 1383 
the castle with the thanedom were resigned by Euphame Countess of Ross, and were granted 
by King Robert II. to her and her husband Alexander Stewart Earl of Buchan the King's son. 11 
In 1394 Eufame Countess of Ross grants a charter at Dyngvale (apparently the castle). 12 In 
1398 Alexander of Lesley Earl of Ross grants a charter at his castle of Dyngwall. 13 In 1411 
Robert Duke of Albany, Regent of Scotland, after the battle of Harlaw, took the castle of 
Dingvall which belonged to the Lord of the Isles (or was held by him as claiming the earldom 
of Ross). 14 In 1443 Alexander of He, Earl of Ross and Lord of the Isles, justiciar north of the 
Forth, dates a charter at the castle of Dyngwele, and in 1463 and 1464 his son and successor 
John of Yle gives charters at the same place. 15 An indenture above detailed, made in 1475 
between David Ross of Balnagovin and John M'Gilleone of Lochboy, with the consent of John 
of Yle Earl of Ross and Lord of the Isles, was made at Dingwell in Ross, apparently at the 
castle. 16 In 1475 the Scotch parliament ordered the sheriffs of Innernys to cite the same John 
of Yle, Lord of the Isles and Earl of Ross, either at the castle of Dyngvale or at the market 
cross of Edinburgh, to appear before the next parliament at Edinburgh to answer for certain 
crimes. 17 On the IGth of October of that year he was summoned by the Unicorn Pursuivant 



' Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. nn. 593, 594. Reg. Sec. 
Sig., vol. xxxi. ff. 98, 99. 2 Ibid. 

:1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. ff. 98, 99. See above, p. 491. 
1 Mun. Corp. Reports. 

5 Retours. c Old Stat. Ace. 

7 New Stat. Ace. 
1 Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 12. 
' See above, pp. 489. 



Balnagown Charters. 

1 Rob. ludex, p. 124, no. 25. 

2 Kilravock Charters. 

' Balnagown Charters. 
Ford. Scot., lib. xv. c. 21. 
Reg. Mug. Sig., lib. vi. no. 116; lib. 
See above, pp. 311, 312, 462. 
Acta Parl. Scot, vol. ii. p. 109. 



DINGWALL.] PAROCHIALES. 497 

as sheriff of Innernes at various places, and among these at the gate of the castle of Dingwail, 
because he could not get admittance into the castle itself. 1 In 1481 King James III., as above 
stated, granted in heritage to James his second son, Marquis of Ormond, the castle of Dingwale 
with the lands of the earldom of Ross, forfeited by John Lord of the Isles and Earl of Rosse. 2 
In 1484 (26 October) the Lords of Council ordained that for the offence of ' lichtlying and con- 
tempcioun done to our Souerane Lordis Hienes' by Archbald of Douglas, Stevin M'Kerbrycht, 
John Thomsoun, James Thomsoun, John Wallace, Patrick Nelesoun, James Ker, Patrick Ker, 
and James of Douglas the son of Archbald, in having violently taken from their beds Sir Dauid 
Purdy subchanter of Glasgow and Sir Alexander Panther his chaplane, dragging them to the 
fields, and with threats compelling Sir Dauid to let his church, and to remit certain sums due to 
him, with other great injuries, therefore Archbald of Douglas, Stevin M'Kerbrycht, and John 
Thomsoun should enter their persons in ward in the castle of Dingwell within twenty days, 
and the rest in the castles of Redecastell and Innernes, and should remain there on their own 
expenses till released by the King under pain of rebellion. 3 About 1508, when James Duke 
of Ross resigned the earldom, he reserved to himself for life the moothill (montem) of Ding- 
wall beside the town, in order to preserve his title of Duke. 4 In 1506 Andro bishop of 
Cathnes was appointed by King James IV. captain of the castle of Dyngwell in Ross for 
9 years. 5 In 1507 the same bishop and another person not named were appointed by King 
James IV. captains and keepers of the castle of Dingwell. 6 In 1511, as we have seen, the same 
king, in granting to the same bishop the lordships of Ros and Ardmannoch, granted to him 
also the usual grassum of the lands for repairing or building the castles of Dingwell and Reid- 
castell. 7 In 1564 a part of the dues of the lands of Drumdarveth in Ardmannoch, consisting 
of 80 loads of fuel, was to be delivered in the castle of Dingwell. 8 In 1584 and 1587 the 
castle of Dingwall, with the houses, buildings, and wards, was included in grants of the lord 
ship or barony made in those years by King James VI. to Sir Andrew Keith. 9 The castle, of 
which a small fragment and the ditcli and glacis still remain, stood on the shore north-east of 
the town, occupied about half an acre of ground, and was flanked on two sides by a small 
deep muddy stream. 10 About the end of the last century the office of constable was said to 
be hereditary in the family of the proprietor of Tulloch, and had attached to it a salary of 
20 marks Scots. 11 

1 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. p. 109. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. ff. 106, 118. 

2 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. ix. nn. 43, 60. "' See above, p. 490. 

3 Acta Dora. Cone., pp. 8!)*, 90*. b Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. no. 443. 
* Additional Sutherland Case, chap. iv. p. 58. 9 See above, p. 491. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 82. '" Old and New Stat. Ace. " Old Stat. Ace. 



498 ORIGINES [FODDERTY. 



FODDERTY. 

Fothirdy 1 Fothartye 2 Feddirdy 3 Foddertie 4 Foddartie 5 
Fodderty. 6 (Map, No. 19). 

THE present parish of Fodderty includes the ancient parish of Kinnettes, and consists chiefly 
of the valley of the river Peferay known as Strathpefler. On its north side lies Benwyvis, the 
highest hill in Ross-shire, on its north Knockfarril, and on its west Craig-an-f hiach (the raven's 
rock). 7 The parish of Kinnettes appears to have had Craig-an-fhiach on the west and Knock 
farril or the Peferay on the south, and to have occupied a comparatively small portion of the 
united parish, including Loch Usie. Fodderty includes several detached glens or straths. 8 

Between the years 1350 and 1372 a charter of William Earl of Ross is witnessed by Robert 
the vicar of Fothirdy. 9 In 1548 Queen Mary presented Sir Andrew Robertsoun chaplain to 
the vicarage of Fothartye, vacant by the resignation of Master William Vrquhart. 10 Sir Andrew 
Robertsoun was vicar between 1561 and 15C6. 11 In 1572 King James VI. presented William 
Hay, ' admittit be the kirk redar in the kirk of Foddertie,' to the vicarage of Foddertie then 
vacant by ' simoniacall pactioun' between Sir John Smyth last vicar and Sir William Chalmer. 12 
In 1574 Alexander Anthane was reader at Foddertie. 13 In the same year King James VI. 
presented Alexander Antone to the vicarage, vacant by the decease of Rorie Bane. 1 * In 1583 
he presented Evir M'Evir to the same vicarage, vacant by the decease of Alexander Anthone. 15 

The church, of which the cemetery is still in use, stood on the left bank of the Pefleray burn. 16 
The modern church, built in 1807 about a mile from the village of Strathpeffer, stands at a con 
siderable distance from the former. 17 

At Inchrory, on the right bank of the Pefferay, immediately opposite the old burying-ground 
of Fodderty, and within this parish or Kinnettes, stood a chapel, held at the Reformation by 
Sir Andrew Robertsoun the vicar of Fodderty. 18 

At the Reformation it was stated that the vicarage, ' quhen all dewties vsit and wont was payit 
gaiff' be yeir in assedatioun to the vicar xx merkis.' 19 In 1574 the reader at Foddertie had for 
his stipend yearly 13, 6s. 8d. (the amount of the vicarage). 20 

1 A. D. 1350-1372. Balnagown Charters. 9 Baluagown Charters. 



2 A. D. 1548. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxii. fol. 10. 

3 A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. 

1 A. D. 1572. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. fol. 38. A. D. 
1574. Book of Assignations. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. 
fol. 89. A. D. 1583. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 64. 
A. D. 1681. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. viii. p. 385. 

5 A. D. 1583. Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 72. 



Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxii. fol. 10. 
Book of Assumptions. 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. fol. 38. 
Book of Assignations. 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 89. 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 64. 
Note by W. H. Murray Esquire. New Stat. Ace 



A. D. 1655. Retours. 7 New Stat. Ace. Modern Maps. " Ibid. 

Old Stat. Ace. The New Stat. Ace. affirms that '" Book of Assumptions. Note by W. H. Murray 

Fodderty includes another parish named Tollie, and Esquire, 

that traces of its burying-grouud remain near Brahan 19 Book of Assumptions. 

Castle, -which lies in Urray. M Book of Assignations. 



FODDERTY.] PAROCHIALES. 499 

The chaplainry of Inchrory at the Eeformation was worth 5 yearly. 1 
Among the lands granted by King James III. to Elizabeth Countess of Ross in 1476, and 
confirmed by that king in 1477, were included the lands of Wetliiruyde (now Auchterneid) and 
the lands of Pollane, either wholly or partly in this parish. 2 In 1526 or previously the lands of 
Dauchauchpollo were held by John Makanedoy, who died without lawful heirs. 3 In 1527 they 
were included with the lands of the forest of Strathvaich (being respectively of the extent of 
6 marks, and of 4 bolls victual and a mart) in a grant by King James V. to William Dingvale 
of Kildun.* In 1542 (28 July) that king granted to Duncan Bayne the lands of Ballafreis, 
Strathskey, the forest of Strathrannoch, and other lands, either wholly or partly in Fodderty. 5 
In the same year (24 October) he granted the lands of Dawachpollo and others to James 
Fraser the brother of Hugh Lord Fraser of Lovet. 6 In 1554 and 1555 appears in record Alex 
ander Bayne in Inchevayneyl (or Enchewany), apparently the modern Inchvandie. 7 In 1578 
Hugh Fraser of Gvisachane, hereditary fear of the lands of Dawaehpolloch, in fulfilment of a 
contract between him and Alexander Bane of Tulloch, sold the half of the town and lands in 
heritage to Alexander and his wife Agnes Fraser, with remainder to the heirs of the former. 8 
In 1579 King James VI. granted to Alexander Bane a crown charter of the lands, and to Hugh 
Fraser a letter of reversion to the same. 9 In 1583 King James seems to have confirmed both 
grants. 10 In 1584 he granted in heritage to Sir Andrew Keith the lands of Dalmalook, Inche- 
vandie, and Ochterneid, with other lands ; the grantee paying yearly for Dalmalook 6, 13s. 4d., 
16 shillings of bondage silver, and 7 reek hens for Inchevandie 4, with 8 shillings of bondage 
silver, and 3 reek hens and for Ochterneid 6, 13s. 4d., 4 muttons, 6s. bondage silver, and 
reek hens. 11 In the same year the lands of Dalmalook were included in the lordship or barony of 
Dingwall granted by the same king to the same Sir Andrew Keith. 12 In 1600 Duncan Bane of 
Tullich was served heir to his father Alexander Bane of Tullich in the lands of Ballafreis, of the 
old extent of 3 marks 4 shillings and other dues ; Sthraithskey, qf the extent of 3 marks and other 
dues ; and the forest of Strathrannoch, of the extent of 4 bolls of bear and other dues. 13 In 
1619 Colin lord of Kintail was served heir male to his grandfather Colin Makkenzie of Kyntail 
in the lands of Dalmalook, Inchvandy, and Ochterneid, respectively of the extent of 6, 13s. 4d., 
4, and 6, 13s. 4d. u In the same year Issobel M'Kenzie was served heir to her father John 
the heir apparent of Garloche in the davach of Davachpollay, of the extent of 6, 8s. and 8s. in 



1 Book of Assumptions. 5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 306. Reg. Sec. Sig. 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. no. 371; lib. viii. no. 40. vol. xvi. fol. 36. See DINGWALL, p. 492. 

See DiNQWALL, pp. 488, 489. 6 Re K- sra B- Sig., lib. xxviii. no. ofio. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxiii. no. 67. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xvi. fol. 87. 

vol. viii. fol. 84. 7 Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 269; lib. xxxii. no. 211. 

4 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 36. Reg. Sec. Sig., 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 107. 
vol. vi. fol. 53; vol. vii. fol. 57. The grants of land 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. ff. 107, 116. 
in this district and the only maps we have do not 10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix., fol. 107. 

determine -whether Strathvaich and some neigh- " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. ff. 87, 88. See DINGWALL, 

bouring lands, afterwards included in the same grant, p. 491. 

lie in Fodderty or in some of the neighbouring 12 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. ff. 98, 99. 

parishes. u Retours. " Ibid. 



500 ORIGINES [FODDKRTY. 

augmentation. 1 In 1635 Alexander Bayne was served heir male and of provision to his father 
Duncan Bayne of Tullich in the half of the forest of Strathrannach, namely Straithewaich and 
Straintirie, of the extent of 2 bolls of victual and other dues. 2 

In 1508 Alexander Seytoun of Tulybody sold to Alexander Earl of Huntlie the lands of 
Fothirty with the mill and brewhouse. 3 In that year or the following the Earl had from King 
James VI. a crown charter of the same. 4 In 1532 King James V. granted in heritage to John 
Mackeneth of Kentaill the lands of Fotherty, which he had acquired from the hereditary proprie 
tor Master John Calder, and had resigned to the King. 5 In 1543 Thomas Dingvale of Kildone 
sold to John Makkenze of Kintail the lands and fishings of Lochbryne in exchange for the lands 
of Fotherty with the mill, to be held of the Queen as Earl of Eoss for payment of 6 pennies as 
blenchferme at Whitsunday. 6 In 1543 and 1544 Queen Mary granted to these parties crown 
charters of the respective lands exchanged. 7 In 1583 King James VI. granted in heritage 
to Colin M'Kainze of Kintaill the lands of the Kirktoun of Foddartie, Balmuldie, and others, 
alienated to him by John Dingwall of Kildun. 8 In 1633 George M'Keinzie was served heir male 
to his brother Colin Earl of Seaforth, Lord M'Keinzie of Kintail, in the lands of Foddertie, 
Mulnaan with the mill, Ballamulich, and others, of the old extent of 5, included in the barony 
of Ellendonan. 9 The lands of Mulnaan, with the mill of Fodderty and the multures, the Kirk 
toun of Fodderty, and Ballamulloche, were together of the old extent of 3 marks 6 shillings and 
8 pence. 10 

In 1533 or previously Thomas Vrquhard sheriff of Cromerty granted to his son and heir appa 
rent Alexander Vrquhard, and to his wife Beatrix Lines, the lands of Inchrory and Dauaclma- 
cleir with the mill (either in Fodderty or in Kinnettes). 11 In 1533 King James V. confirmed the 
grant. 12 In 1549 the same Alexander appears in record as Alexander Vrquhart of Ynchrorie. 13 
In 1599 Thomas Urquhart was served heir to his father Henry Urquhart, sheriff apparent of 
Cromcrthie, in the lands, mill, multures, and mill-lands of Incherorie, the davach of Davach- 
naclerache, and the shoaling called Garbet, of the old extent of 4. 14 

On the north of the burying-ground at Fodderty lies a croft named Croicht-an-teampuil, in 
which stone coffins have been found. 15 

On the east side of the church are two erect stones, probably the remains of a circle, but 
without any known history. 16 

On the heights of Hilton are a large cairn measuring 260 feet by 20, and the remains of 
two stone circles. 17 

1 Rctours. ' Ibi.l. 

- Ibid. * Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 72. 

' Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. xv. no. 141. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 9 Retours. 

iv. fol. 35. 4 Ibid. lu Ibid. 

6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxiv. no. 202. Reg. Sec. Sig., " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 177. 
vol. ix. fol. 111. The latter authority states that the 
lands were resigned by John M'Kcnich of Kintaill 



and by Sir John Campbell of C'aldor. 

6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxix. nn. 93, 205. Reg. Sec. 
Sig., vol. xviii. fol. 34. 



2 Ibid. 

Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 419. 
Retours. 
New Stat. Ace. 
Ibid. 



KIXNETTES.] PAROCHIALES. 501 



KINNETTES. 

Kennetis l Kynnattas 2 Kynnettis 3 Kinnettes. 4 (Map, No. 20.) 

THIS parish, now united to Fodderty, seems, as already stated, to have included the southern 
and smaller portion of the united parish, extending either from the Pefferay or Knockfarril on 
the north, and from the Craig-an-fhiach on the west, to Brahan and the river Conan on the 
south and east, and thus including the small lake named Loch Usie. 

There appears to be no notice of this church till the era of the Reformation. It was annexed 
to the chancellary of Ross. Between 1561 and 1566 Master Duncan Chalmere was chancellor 
or ' vsufructuare,' and the parsonage and vicarage of Kennetis and the rest of the fruits of 
the chancellary were held in lease by Mr. David Chalmer titular and Richard Wrwing his factor. 5 
In 1574 Master George Monro was minister at Suddy and Kynnattas, and Alexander Bane 
younger was reader at the latter. 6 In 1584 King James VI. confirmed a charter by Master 
Duncan Chalmer chancellor of Ross, granting with the consent of the dean and chapter to Sir 
Patrick Jolmestoun vicar pensioner of Kynnettis in liferent, and to Patrick Johnestoun his natural 
son and male heirs, with remainder to Patrick's brother-gcrman William Johnestoun and his male 
heirs, and to their father's male heirs whomsoever, the town and lands of Kynnettis with the 
parsonage tithes included, then occupied by Patrick Johnestoun. 7 In 1592 the same king granted 
to Master David Chalmer of Ormound the glebes and manses of the chancellary of Ros and the 
vicarage of Suddie, and the glebe, nianse, and kirklands of Kynnettis with tithes included, lying 
in the canonry of Ros at the kirks of Suddy and Kynnettis respectively. 8 In 1655 Sir George 
Mackeinzie of Tarbit was served heir male to his father Sir George in the kirklands of Kinnettes 
with the teinds within the parish of Kinnettes, of the extent of 8 marks, 5 shillings and 4 pence, 
which in 1681 were with the patronage of the church included in the barony of Tarbet then 
confirmed by King Charles II. to the same Sir George and John Mackenzie his son. 9 

The church, of which the cemetery still exists, stood to the westward of Knockfarril. 10 

Traces of a burying-ground remain at Tollie near Brahan, and are said to mark the site of 
an old parish church. 11 

Near Craig-an-fhiach is a well named Saint's well, and beside Knockfarril is the well of John 
the Baptist. 12 

1 A.I). 1501 -1566. Book of Assumptions. 6 Book of A ssignations. 

2 A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 89. 

3 A. D. 1584. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 89. A. D. 9 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. iii. p. 601. 

1592. Acta Parl. Scot, vol. iii. p. 601. 9 Retours. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. viii. p. 385. 

4 A. D. 1655. Retours. A. D. 1681. Acta Parl. 10 New Stat. Ace. Thomson's Map. 
Scot., vol. viii. p. 385. " New Stat. Ace. 

' Book of Assumptions. ' 3 Ibid. 



502 



OEIGINES 



[KINNETTES. 



The chapel and lands of Inchrory, described under Fodderty, may have been within the 
bounds of this parish. 1 

The whole chancellary of Ross, as given up at the Eeformation by Master David Chahner 
titular of the teinds, amounted to 173, 6s. 8d. 2 In 1574 Master George Monro the minister 
had the whole chancellary, out of which he paid the readers at Suddy and Kynnattas each 
20 marks, they having also the kirklands. 3 

In 1463 John of Yle, Earl of Ross and Lord of the Isles, granted to Thomas the younger of 
Dingvale the lands of Vsuy in the earldom of Ross and sheriffdom of Innernys, in exchange for 
the third part of Arkboll and the lands of Inchfure in the mairdom of Delny, with remainder to 
his brother John of Dingvale and his heirs, and to their better and more worthy successor and 
relative of the name of Dinguale ; reserving to the Earl the old mill with the usual toft and croft, 
and the usual multures and sequels (except those of the town of Vsuy), and the use of the stream 
descending from the lake of Vsuy, all as formerly and reserving to Sir Thomas of Dingvale the 
Earl's chamberlain the liferent of the lands of Vsuy ; for a yearly payment of 6 pennies in name 
of blenchfcnne.* In 1464 the grant was confirmed by King James III. 5 In 1476 that king 
granted to Elizabeth Countess of Ross, the wife of John Earl of Ross and Lord of the Isles, for 
her maintenance certain lands in Ross, including Park, Elodil, Ouse, and the mill and brewhouse 
of Tympane, all which she had held in conjunct infeftment with her husband before his for 
feiture. 6 In 1477 on attaining his majority he confirmed the grant. 7 In 1527 King James V. 
granted to William Dingvale of Kildun various lands in Ross, including the mill of Housy with 
the house and lands of the extent of 10 marks. 8 In 1542 the mill of Ousse with its croft and 
alehouse, and the astricted multures and suckin of Tolle and other lands, were included in a 
grant by the same king to Duncan Bayne. 9 In 1583 King James VI. confirmed a charter by 
John Ding wall of Kildun, alienating in heritage to Colin M'Kainzie of Kintaill the lands of Lytill 
Vsui and Mekill Vsui, with other lands in the earldom of Ross. 10 In 1586 the same king granted 
in heritage to William Keith the master of his wardrobe various lands in Ross, including Ardwaill 
with the mill called Tympane Myln and multures, the alehouse of Kennetis alias Ardwell, the 
lands of Park, and the lands of Vlladaill ; the grantee paying yearly for Ardwell 53s. 4d., 6 bolls 
meal, 6 bolls bear, 6 bolls oats, 2 marts, 2 muttons, 6 poultry, 60 ' girthstingis,' 60 loads of fuel, 
100 draughts of fuel, 8s. of bondage silver, and 40s. every 5 years as grassum for the mill of 
Ardwell or Tympane Myln with the multures, 1 chalder 2 bolls victual of the measure of Leith 
for the alehouse of Kynnettis or Ardwell 13s. 4d., and the same sum as grassum for Park 
46s. 8d., 4s. of bondage silver, 3 poultry, 40s. as grassum, and 40 loads of fuel, with the usual 
services and for Vlladaill, 40s., 8s. of bondage silver, 3 poultry, 40s. as grassum, and 40 loads 
of fuel, with the usual services. 11 In 1600 Duncan Bayne of Tullich was served heir to his father 



See FODDERTY, pp. 498, 500. 

Book of Assumptions. 

Book of Assignations. 

Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vi. no. 17. 

Ibid. 

Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. no. 371. 



7 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. viii. no. 40. 

8 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 36. 

Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 306. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vol. xvi. fol. 36. 

lu Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 72. 
11 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. 



KISNKTTES.] PAROCHIALES. 503 

Alexander in various lands, including the mill of Oussie with its croft and alehouse, and the 
astricted multures and suckin of Tollie. 1 In 1633 George M'Keinzie was served heir male to his 
brother Colin Earl of Seaforth, Lord M'Keinzie of Kintail, in many lands in Ross, including the 
lands of Meikle Usie and Litill Usie, apparently of the old extent of 2, 13s. 4d. 2 In 1655 Sir 
George M'Keinzie of Tarbit was served heir male to his father Sir George in the lands of Ardavell, 
a half davach, of the extent of 3, 9s. 4d. and other dues the lands and town of Ulladill, a half 
davach, of the extent of 3, 16s. and the mill called Tympane Mill, of the extent of 1 chalder 
2 bolls of bear all in the lordship of Dingwall and earldom of Ross. 3 

In the year 1507 John Mowat of Loscragy and Freswick granted in heritage to his brother 
Alexander, with reversion to himself and his heirs, the half of the lands of Estir Dryne and Con- 
taneloid in the lordship of Ros, and his tofts and crofts in the burgh of Dingwell, the grantee 
giving the forinsec service due to the King, and paying yearly one penny sterling to the granter. 4 
In 1508 King James IV. confirmed the grant. 5 In 1534 King James V. granted in heritage 
to John M'Alester M'Alester of Elanterin, captain of Clanranald, and to Mariot Maccane his 
wife, 10 marklands of old extent in the sheriffdom of Innernys, including the 4 marklands of 
Kandinloid and Ardnequhoray, which John had resigned. 6 In 1547 Queen Mary granted to 
William Denowne of Petnele the nonentry and other dues of certain lands in the earldom 
of Ross which were in her hands since the decease of Alexander Dunnvne of Dauidstoun, 
including the half of Cultenloid and the half of Dryne. 7 In 1556 Donald Donowne of Kenroy, 
the son and heir of the deceased John Donowne of Dauidstoun, sold the half of the lands of 
Cultaloid and Dryne to John Mackenzie of Kintaill, to whom in the same year Queen Mary 
granted a crown charter of the same. 8 About the year 1575 Colin M'Kenzie of Kintale granted 
in liferent to Alexander Bane of Tullycht and Agnes Eraser his wife, liferenters of the lands 
of Rewindoun in the barony of Beulie, and in heritage to Alexander Bane their elder son, 
fear of the same lands, with remainder to other heirs of Alexander by Agnes Eraser, and to 
his own heirs whomsoever, the half of the lands of Cultalode and Eister Drynie in the earldom 
Ross, to be held of the King as Earl. 9 In 1575 King James VI. confirmed the grant. 10 
In 1583 King James granted in heritage to Colin M'Kainze of Kintaill the half of the lands 
of Cultelcudie and Glenskanych in the earldom of Ros, formerly belonging in heritage to 
Alexander Bane the son of Alexander Bane of Tullych, and in liferent to the latter and 
Agnes Eraser his wife, and with their consent resigned by their son Alexander Bane, the 
grantee rendering the services formerly due. 11 In 1633 George M'Kenzie was served heir male 
to his brother Colin Earl of Seaforth, Lord M'Keinzie of Kintail, in a number of lands in 
the earldom of Ross, including the lands of Cultealoid and Glenskeoch of the old extent of 4, 
13s. 4d. 12 The lands of Drynie, as before stated, lie in the parish of Dingwall. The lands of 

1 Retours. ' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. x.\i. fol. 30. 

2 Ibid. e Reg. Mae. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 358. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
^ Ibid. vol. xxviii, fol. 33. 

4 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xv. no. 16. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. fol. 39. 10 Ibid, 

iii. fol. 193. 5 Ibid. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 72. 

4 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. \xv. no. 141. ' 2 Retours. 



504 



ORIGINES 



[CONTIX. 



Contaneloid or Cultelloid were subsequently known as Culeloid, and have been modernised into 
Castle Leod. 

The village of Strathpeffer, famous as a watering-place, and the villages of Maryburgh and 
Keithtown, appear to lie within the bounds of the parish of Kinnettes. 1 

On the west side of Strathpeffer is Castle Leod, a seat of the Earls of Cromertie, bearing 
the date 1616. 2 

On the summit of Knockfarril is a vitrified wall enclosing about an acre, and connected in 
tradition with the Fions or Fingalians. 3 Near the same hill there is a circular hollow sur 
rounded with stones, and in another part of the parish one of the same kind both locally 
termed Fairy folds. 4 

At Park is a circle of erect stones 15 feet in diameter, from which run eastward two rows 
9 feet in length and 6 feet apart. 5 It is traditionally connected with the battle of Blar-na-pairc 
fought about 1480 between the Macdonalds and Mackenzies, but is evidently of much older date, 
though it marks the spot. 6 

Near Castle Leod is a stone sculptured with the figure of an eagle and known as the Clach- 
an-tiompan, supposed to mark the scene of a conflict between the Munroes and Mackenzies. 7 



CONTIN. 

Conten 8 Contan 9 Contayne J Qwentan (or Qweittan) l ] Contane l " 
Cowtane 13 Kirk Contain. 14 (Map, No. 21.) 

THIS large and mountainous parisli is about 30 miles square, and includes almost every varietv 
of scenery. It is watered by Loch Fannich, Loch Luichart, Loch Rusque, and many smaller 
lakes, and by the rivers Bran, Garve, llasay, Conan, Orrin, and others. It is entirely inland, 
and on its western border is skirted by no fewer than five large parishes. 

In the year 1227 John the vicar of Conten was present at Kenedor in Moray with others of 
the clergy of Eoss at the settlement of a dispute between the bishops of Moray and Ross about 
the churches of Kyntalargyn and Ardrosser. 15 The Aberdeen Breviary, without giving the date, 



1 New Stat. Ace. County Maps. 2 Ncw 34., t Acc 

3 Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Aoc. Miller's Scenes 
and Legends. Sec Regist. Moravieuse, p. 457. 

4 New Stat. Ace. 5 Ibid. 
* Ibid. Anderson, p. 559. Gregory, p. 92. 

7 New Stat. Ace. 

9 A. I). 1227. Resist. Moraviense, p. 82. 
9 A. D. 1510. Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, 
estiv., fol. 90. A. I). 1575. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. 



fol. 11. A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 
Circa A.D. 1040. Blaeu. 
lu Circa A. D. 1535. Libellus Taxationum. 

11 A. D. 1550. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiv. fol. 12. 

12 A. D. 1561-66. Book of Assumptions. A. D. 1574. 
Book of Assignations. 

'' A. D. 1587. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol. 89. 

14 Circa A.D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. 

15 Regist. Moraviense. p. 82. 



CONTIN.] PAROCHIALES. 505 

informs us that about 500 Islanders invaded Boss, set fire to the church of Saint Malrube of 
Contan while the inhabitants were celebrating his anniversary (27 August or 21 April), and by 
fire and sword destroyed about 100 men and women. 1 The men of Eoss, we are informed by 
the same authority, encouraged by the appearance of the deceased saint bearing a staif or crosier, 
though inferior in numbers, attacked and defeated the Islanders, leaving scarce 30 of them alive. 2 
In 1529 the canons of Fearn had a yearly revenue of 8 Ibs. of wax in the town called Conten. 3 
In 1550 Queen Mary presented David Stewart to the rectory of the parish church of Qwentan, 
vacant by the decease of a person of the surname of Fores. 4 At the Reformation the parsonage 
and vicarage of Contane belonged to Master Robert Burnet. 5 In 1574 Donald Adamsoun was 
minister of Contane and several other parishes, and the office of reader at Contane was vacant. 6 
In 1575 occurs the legitimation of Alexander and Robert the sons of Master Robert Burnet 
rector of Contan. 7 In 1587 the same Master Robert appears as vicar of Cowtane and canon 
of Ross. 8 

The church dedicated to Saint Malrube seems to have always stood in the extreme east of the 
parish on an island in the river Rasay near its confluence with the Conan. 9 The date of the 
present building is unknown. 10 A church was built at Keanlochluichart in 1825, and another 
at Strathconan in 1830. 11 

In Baiamund's Roll the church is rated at 53s. 4d. ; in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued at 
26, 13s. 4d. 12 At the Reformation the parsonage and vicarage were let yearly for the sum of 
40. 13 In 1574 the reader at Contane had for his stipend 20 marks and the kirklands. 14 

About the year 1309 King Robert Bruce granted the lands of Strathconan to Hugh of Ross. 15 
In 1538 King James V. by a letter under his privy seal declared John M'Kanze of Kintaile to 
be heritable proprietor of the lands of Meyn in Strachonane, and of the lands of Eschadillis, 
Innermanv, Innerquhonray, and Kinlochbanquhare, in the lordship of Ros and sheriffdom of 
Innernys; and ordered his comptroller and auditors of his exchequer to ' delete and put furth' 
the lands from the exchequer rolls. 16 At the same time he united those lands, namely, two 
marklands of Kinlochbanquhar, three marklands of Innerquhonray, three marklands of Innermany, 
four marklands of Meyne in Strachonane, and four marklands of Eschadillis, to the barony of 
Eleandonnan belonging to the same John M'Kanze of Kintaile. 17 In 1543 Queen Mary granted 
in heritage to Kenneth Mackenze, the son and apparent heir of John Mackenze of Kintaill, and 
to Isabel Stewart his wife, along with lands in the lordship of Kintaill, the lands of Maneye and 
Eskadillis in the lordship of Straconnan, and others, which John Mackenze had resigned. 18 In 
1571 Colin Makcanze of Kintaill, in fulfilment of a contract between himself on the one side 

1 Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, estiv., fol. 90. ll Ibid. These are perhaps old church districts, 

2 Ibid. 3 Balnagown Charters. though there seems to be no record or remains to 
4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiv. fol. 12. show it. 

' Book of Assumptions. 6 Book of Assignations. I2 MSS. in Adv. Lib. 13 Book of Assumptions. 

' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. fol. 11. " Book of Assignations. 15 Rob. Index, p. 2, no. 60. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol. 89. 16 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xii. fol. 21. " Ibid. 
9 MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. OldStat.Acc. New Stat. 18 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 524. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

Ace. County Maps. "> New Stat. Ace. vol. xvii. fol. 56. 

VOL. II. 3 S 



506 OEIGINES [CONTIN. 

and John Grant of Frewchie for himself and Barbara Grant on the other, granted to Barbara, who 
was his affianced spouse, certain lands, including those of Kinlochbeancharan and Innerchonray. 1 
In 1572 King James VI. confirmed the grant. 2 In 1574 Colin M'Keinzie of Kintaill was served 
heir to Kenneth M'Keinzie his father in the four marklands of Meyncn and the four marklands 
of the davach of Eschidaill, and other lands, in the barony of Ellendonane, of the old extent 
of 5 marks. 3 In 1633 George M'Keinzie was served heir male to his brother Colin Earl of 
Seaforth, Lord M'Keinzie of Kintail, in the lands and barony of Ellendonan, including among 
others the two marks of Kenlochbencharran, three marks of Innerchonran, three marks of Inner- 
venane, four marks of Mainzic, and four marks of the davach of Eskidillis. 4 

Among the lands granted by King James III. to Elizabeth Countess of Eoss for her ho 
nourable maintenance in 1476, and confirmed to her by that king in 1477, were included the 
lands of Row and the lands of Cwyl. 5 In 1526 the lands of Eewy extending in the King's 
rental to 53s. 8d., and the lands of Achnaclcroch (or Achnacherach) extending in the same rental 
to 33s. 4d., were included in the tenandry of Culmelloquhy then granted by King James V. to 
Walter Innes of Tulchis. 6 In a subsequent grant by the same king in 1527, given in order to 
augment his rental by the sum of 6 yearly, Kewy was lot at 3, Os. 8d., and Auchnaclerauch at 
40s. 7 In 1528 the same king granted to Walter Innes the lands of Culcragy (apparently in 
Contin), and annexed them to the tenandry of Culmaloquhy. 8 In 1538 he granted to the same 
Walter for five years the same tenandry, including the lands of Auchinaglerauch, the lands of 
Rewey, and the lands of Culcragy. 9 In 1584 King James VI. granted to Sir Andrew Keith the 
lands of Auchnaclerauche, for the yearly payment of 53s. 4d., a reek hen, and 4s. of bondage 
silver. 10 In 1586 the same king granted in heritage to William Keith the master of his wardrobe 
various lands in Eoss, including the lands of Culcragie and Eewy, the alehouse of Coull with a 
croft, and the alehouse of Coull without a croft ; the grantee paying yearly for Eewy 3, 6s. 8d., 
with 8s. of bondage silver, and 1 poultry, and 3, 6s. 8d. every five years as grassum for the 
alehouse of Coull with croft 26s. 8d. and the same sum as grassum for the alehouse without 
croft 13s. 4d. and the same sum as grassum and for Culcragie certain dues not specified, but 
included in one payment with those of some other lands. 11 In 1619 Colin Lord of Kintail was 
served heir male to his grandfather Colin Makkeinzie of Kyntail in the lands of Auchnaelerach, 
of the extent of 26s. 8d. 12 

In 1528 King James V. granted to John M'Kenze of Kintaill the 4 lands of Estir Hecheley 
and Westir Hecheley, the 4 marklands of Cumerly, the 4 lands of Mekle Scathole, and other 
lands in the earldom of Eoss, for yearly payment of 18, 13s. 4d., in order to augment his rental 
by the sum of 4. 13 In 1529 the same king granted to Eoderick or Eory Makkenze the two 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. fol. 94. 2 Ibid. ' Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 4. 

3 Rctours. 4 Ibid. 8 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 133. 

5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. no. 371 ; lib. viii. no. 40. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xi. fol. 75. 

See DINOWALL, pp. 488, 489. "> Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. ff. 87, 88. See DING-WALL, 

c Acta 1'arl. Scot., vol. ii. p. 317. Reg. Mag. Sig., p. 491. 

lib. xxi. no. 7. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. vi. fol. 34; vol. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv.ff. 46-48. See ALNEgs,p.474. 

vii. fol. 34. See ALNESS, p. 474. 12 Retours. 13 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 250. 



KILMORACK.] PAKOCHIALES. 507 

Acheleis, Cumry, the two Scatellis, and the mill of Contane, in the lordship of Ross. 1 In 1584 
King James VI. granted in heritage to Sir Andrew Keith the lands of Cumree and others in 
Boss, the grantee paying yearly for Cumrie 53s. 4d., with 8s. of bondage silver and one reek 
hen. 2 In 1586 the same king granted in heritage to William Keith the master of his wardrobe 
various lands, including Littill Scattoll, Kynnallan, Eister Achillie, Westir Achillie, and Mekle 
Scattoll ; the grantee paying for Littill Scattoll yearly 4, with 8s. of bondage silver, one 
poultry, and 3 marts, and every five years as grassum 4 for Kynnellan, with Essy, Coull, 
and the mill of the same with the multures, 15, 4s. yearly, and 23, 10s. every five years as 
grassum for Eister Achillie yearly 40s., with 4s. of bondage silver, and 2 reek hens, with the 
usual services, and every five years 4 as grassum for Wester Achillie the same and for 
Mekill Scattoll yearly 4, with 8s. of bondage silver, 1 poultry, 3 marts, and the usual services, 
and every five years 4 as grassum. 3 In 1619 Colin lord of Kintail was served heir male to 
his grandfather Colin Makkeinzie of Kyntail in the lands of Comrie of the extent of 53s. 4d.* 
In 1669 Colin Earl of Balcarras was served heir to his father Earl Alexander in the lands of 
Kynellane and Oray (or Cray), and Escoule with the mill (apparently the lands described in 
1586 as Kynellan, with Essy, Coull, and the mill), of the extent of 15, 4s. 5 

A fair is held twice a year at Contin Inn. 6 

At the eastern end of Loch Achilty there is a circle of stones, within which were found 
some empty urns. 7 

Near Loch Kinellan is Blair-nan-ceann (the field of heads), a name supposed to commemorate 
the same conflict as Blair-na-pairc. 8 In the loch is an artificial island on which it is said that the 
Seaforth family had formerly a stronghold. 9 

In Loch Achilty, also on an island believed to be artificial, are some ruins pointed out as once 
the residence of a person known as Maclea Mor, and a vault formerly existing in the parish 
church was known as Cruist Mhic Lea and said to have been the burial place of that family. 10 



KILMORACK. 

Kilmorok 11 Kilmoricht 12 Kilmorak 13 Kilmarak. 14 (Map, No. 22.) 

THIS parish, anciently included in the earldom of Boss, and now in the county of Inverness, 
consists of a well cultivated plain on the north of the river Beauly, and of an upland district 
including Glenafiaric, Glencannich, Glenfarrar, and a part of Strathglass, all watered by streams 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 234. Reg. Sec. Sig., 8 Ibid. See KINNETTES, p. 504. 9 Ibid, 
vol. viii. ff. 6, 7. 10 Ibid. " A. D. 1437. Athole Charters. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. ff. 87, 88. See DINGWALL, " A.D. 1521. Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. 

p. 491. 13 A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. A. D. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. 1574. Book of Assignations. Circa A. D. 1640. MS. 

4 Retours. 5 Ibid. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. 

6 New Stat. Ace. 7 Ibid. " A.D. 1573. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 98. 



508 OKIGINES [KILMORACK. 

which unite to form the Beauly. Its chief lakes, formed in the courses of those streams, are 
Loch Affaric, Loch Beneiran, Loch Moyley, and Loch Monar. Tlie falls of Kilmorack and other 
scenes on the Beauly are noted for their beauty. 

A charter granted in 1437 by Hugh Fraser lord of Lovet to Alexander of He Earl of Ross is 
witnessed by Sir John the vicar of Kilmorok. 1 Robert bishop of Ross, who died in 1521, 
granted to Thomas Fraser of Lovet and his heirs the lands of the Kirktoun of Kilmoricht, with 
the ' craig' and fishing of that town commonly called the Ess of Kilmorichte, belonging to the 
church of Kilmorichte, in the earldom of Ross for the yearly payment of 10, 6s. Sd. Scots, 
namelv, 8, 6s. 8d. for 4 barrels of salmon according to the common valuation of the yearly fish 
ing called the Ess, and 40s. as the old ferme of the Kirktoun and the ' craig' with 3 in 
augmentation of the rental. 2 In 1532 Hugh Fraser of Lovet as heir of Thomas petitioned 
Silvester the Pope's legate for confirmation of the grant ; and the legate in compliance with his 
request issued in a mandate addressed to Robert abbot of Killoss and Donald abbot of Feme, 
who consequently cited all concerned to appear before them on the 28th of August of that 
year in the aisle of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the cathedral church of Ross to witness the 
confirmation. 3 There seems to be no farther notice of this church till the Reformation, at which 
time the vicar was Sir John Nicolsoun. 4 In 1573 King James VI. presented Donald Dow to 
the vicarage, then vacant by the resignation of the same Sir John. 5 In 1574 Donald Dow was 
minister of Kilmorak and several other churches, and there was no reader at Kilmorak. 6 

The church, dedicated apparently to Saint Moroc (who is said to have been a Culdee abbot 
at Dunkeld, and was commemorated on the 8th of November) stood near the falls of Kilmorack 
on the left bank of the Beauly. 7 It was rebuilt in the end of the last century, apparently 
on the same site. 8 

In 1230 the priory of Beauly (prioratui de Bello Loco, Beaulieu, Beuling, Bewlie) was founded 
by Sir John Byseth (Biset, Bissate, Bisset) of Lovat for monks of the order of Vallis Caulium.' 1 
The terms of the foundation are said to have been that the monks should pray for the founder 
during his life; that they should receive his body when dead; and that they should com 
memorate him by continual sacrifices and works of piety. 10 One of the Popes named Gregory 
(apparently Pope Gregory IX. who filled the chair from 1227 to 1241) confirmed and took under 
his protection the property of the monks of Beauly, especially Fitheney and Karcurri and the 
fishing of the Forne granted to them by John Biseth. 11 Between the years 1230 and 1242 
William Byseth, the brother of John, granted to the monks the church of Aberterth (Abirtarf 
in the diocese of Moray). 12 Between the same years Andrew (de Moravia) bishop of Moray 

1 Atholc Charters. 9 Ext. e Var. Cron. Scocie, p. 93. Spotiswood's Keli- 

- Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. gious Houses. Macfarlane. Old Stat. Ace. 
1 Ibid. 10 Spotiswood. Old Stat. Ace. 

4 Book of Assumptions. " Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. Spotiswood. 

b Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 98. In Macfarlane's copy of the deed of confirmation John 

6 Book of Assignations. Biseth (who died about 1268) is not said to be dead a 

7 Camerarius, p. 186. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. circumstance which seems to assign the confirmation to 
New Stat. Ace. Pope Gregory IX. 

* Old Stat. Ace. 12 Beauly Charters apud Macfarlanr. 



KILMOEACK.] PAKOCHIALES. 509 

confirmed to the monks of Beauly (Belli Loci juxta Beaufort) the teinds of the church of Aberterf, 
the churchlands of the same, and the tithe of all the salmon fishings in that parish, which were 
granted to them by William Byseth. 1 In 1255 Laurence the soldier (miles), the son of Patrick 
the gateward (janitor) of Innernis, quitclaimed to the monks all right which he had in Bromihalw 
and in the Island. 2 Between the years 1275 and 1294 David of Innerlunan, with the consent of 
Gillicrist Macgilliduff, quitclaimed to the monks his land of Ouchterwaddale (or Onachtervadal) 
extending to half a davach, which he held in lease of Gillicrist, by whom the same land was 
granted to the monks. 3 In 1278 Andrew de Boseho and Elisabeth (Byseth) his wife granted to 
them two marks to be yearly received at their castle of Eddyrdor from them and their heirs or 
from their bailies for the time, or in their tenement of Eddirdor. 4 In 1279 the prior of Beauly 
was one of the sub-deputies appointed by the abbot of Der, who was commissioned by the Pope 
(Nicolas III.) to settle a dispute about the kirklands of Keltalargyn between Archibald bishop of 
Moray and William of Fenthon lord of Beuford. 5 Subsequently to the year 1280 Cecilia Byseth, 
the widow of Sir William of Fentoun, granted to the monks of Beauly her third part of Altyr 
falling to her as heir. 6 Apparently between 1309 and 1325 Patrick of Graham granted to the 
same monks his third part of Altre in exchange for the multures of the lands of Loueth, Fyngask, 
Dofnaldistun, and others also in compensation for 40 marks due by him to them as the third of 
120 marks in which the deceased Sir John Byseth (his grandfather) had bound himself and his 
heirs to the fabric of Beauly also in compensation for 25 marks in which he (Patrick of Graham) 
was bound to them by occasion of the unjust detention of the multure of the said lands and 
also in compensation for 17 marks in which he was bound to them of the debt of Sir David his 
father ; and, should he or his heirs recall this grant, the multures of the lands should revert to the 
monks for ever. 7 In 1329 William of Fenton lord of Beuford granted to them two marks yearly 
from the mill of Beuford, to be paid by his bailies of Beuford or by the farmers of the mill. 8 In 
1340, by a charter dated apud Bellwn Locum, John called of Urchard, perpetual vicar of Abber- 
therff, quitclaimed to the monks all right which he had in the tithe of the fishing of Abbertherff, 
granted (or confirmed) to them by the deceased Andrew bishop of Moray. 9 In 1341, 1356, and 
1357 Robert prior of Beauly appears in record. 10 In 1362 we have Symon prior de Bella Loco. 11 
Apparently between that date and 1372, and certainly between 1336 and 1372, a charter by 
William Earl of Ross is witnessed by Sir Maurice prior Belli Loci. 12 One of the popes named 
Gregory, said to be Gregory XI., by a bull dated at Lyons on 15 March in the third year of his 
pontificate, confirmed all the privileges of the monks of Beauly. 13 In 1471 is recorded the death 

1 Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. Spotiswood glass (apparently the ' Island' of the above grant, and 
styles the subjects of this confirmation ' their tithes and the modern ' Eilan-Aigas'). Balnagown Charters, 
fishings on Spey, and the teind sheaves of the parish 3 Beauly Charters. 4 Ibid, 
of Abertarf.' The deed is not recorded in the Regist. 5 Regist. Moraviense, p. 140. 

Morav., from which however it would seem that Wil- 6 Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. ~ Ibid. 

Ham Byseth, whom Spotiswood styles ' knight, : was * Ibid. 9 Ibid, 

parson of Kiltarlity. 10 Balnagown Charters. 

2 Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. In 1398 Alex- " Original at Floors. 12 Balnagown Charters. 
ander Lesley Earl of Ross granted to Walter of Ross 13 Beauly Charters. If the Pope was Gregory XL. 
lord of Raricheis the lands of Dutus Aygass in Stra- the bull was granted 15 March 1373. 



510 ORIGINES [KILMORACK. 

of Alexander Frisale prior of Bewly. 1 In 1480 appear in record Sir John Fynla prior, and Sir 
Patrick Morra and Sir John Duncan monks. 2 Sir John Fynla appears to have been succeeded by 
Hugh Frezel, who died extra Romanam curiam. 3 In 1497 Pope Alexander VI. presented Dougald 
M'Kory (Roderici) clerk to the priorate, then vacant by the death of Hugh Frezel, commanding 
the bishops of Aberdeen and Eos, the official of Eos, the abbot and convent of Vallis Caulium, and 
the subprior and brethren de Bella Loco or of Bculie, to receive Dougald, if qualified, as a monk, 
and to induct him into the priorate, whose fruits he alleged did not exceed 40 yearly. 4 Andrew 
bishop of Moray was commissioned to give effect to the appointment ; and in 1501 the same pope 
issued a similar mandate in Dougald's favour. 5 In 1506 James Court ois (or Quartus), prior gene 
ral of the order of Vallis Caulium (Val des Choux), commissioned the prior of Beuling to visit 
the priory of Ardquhattan (in Argyle), which belonged to the same order. 6 In the same year 
(18 December) the prior general, styling himself ' brother James Courtois, prior of the monastery 
of Valliscaulium, head or general of that order situated in the duchy of Burgundy near Chatillon 
on the Seine,' addressed a letter to the prior of Beauly to the following effect That on the date 
of his letter a Scottish priest named William Thomson appeared in the priory of Valliscaullium, and 
presented certain letters unsigned and unsealed, dated 10 November preceding, and addressed to 
the prior general by the prior of Beauly ; that, whereas the latter complained that the bishop of 
Eoss or his official claimed the right of visiting the monastery of Beauly, and the prior maintained 
that the order was exempt from episcopal jurisdiction, which was not true, the prior general 
informed him that in France the order had but thirteen small houses situated in five dioceses, and 
that they were regularly visited by the bishops ; that, whereas the prior of Beauly desired an 
authentic copy of the institution and confirmation of the privileges of the order, the prior 
general could not then furnish it, as the original lay in their treasury at Bivion, and he on 
account of the approaching feast of the Nativity (25 December) and his own ill health could 
not go thither ; that he wondered how the prior could rule the priory of Beauly and its depen 
dent monasteries without either coming or sending to the prior general to have institution and 
confirmation of the same ; that he therefore exhorted him under the usual penalties to appear 
in a chapter of the order to be held on the next feast of the Invention of the Holy Cross (3 May 
1507), that he might there show him the confirmation, statutes, and privileges of the order ; that 
the prior's last predecessor (Hugh Frezel) had promised that he or his procurator would appear in 
the general chapter once every four years, and yet, though the prior general on account of the 
distance had extended the interval to six years, neither the deceased prior, nor his procurator, nor 
the present prior, nor any person for him, had appeared, with which he thought he (the prior gene 
ral) should not rest satisfied ; and that moreover, although the prior's predecessor or his procurator 
had promised to send salmon named from their country, or rivers, or waters, to the town of Bruges 
or Valenciennes, whither the prior general had commissioned merchants to receive them and carry 
them to Bivion, yet ho had never received any from the deceased prior or his procurator ; but 

1 Calendar of Fearn. - Beauly Charters. 6 Ibid. The prior of this and the following notice 

' Ibid. ' Ibid. 5 Ibid. must have been Dougald M'Rory. 



KILMORACK.] PAEOCHIALES. 511 

that, as the said William, the bearer of this letter, had assured him that the present prior was 
a man of nobility, of veracity, and of good religion, he believed that during the following 
summer he would do him reason not only for his predecessor but also for himself. 1 In 1513 
Pope Julius II. granted a bull in favour of Dougall prior of Beauly and the convent, threatening 
with excommunication all who had intermeddled with their property, unless they made restitution 
within a certain time. 2 In 1514 the bull was published by Robert Fresel dean and official of 
Boss. 3 In 1529 King James V. promoted Master James Haswell, chaplain of the chapel of Saint 
Margaret in the castle of Edinburgh, to the dignity of prior of Bewling. 4 About the year 
1530 Robert Reid abbot of Kinloss was appointed commendator of Bewlie ; in 1540 he was 
made bishop of Orkney, and appears to have held those three offices till his death in 1558. 5 In 
1537 he received seven young men into the priory as monks, and was engaged in preparing 
material for building the nave of the church. 6 In 1540, on his appointment to the bishoprick 
of Orkney, he went into that district, and on his return brought five young monks of Beauly 
to Kynlos, and put them under the charge of John Ferrerius, whom he had brought from 
France in 1528 to instruct the monks of Kynlos. 7 The five monks were Sir Thomas Togny, 
Sir David Dason, Sir John Crauford, Sir James Pop, and Sir Gilbert Gray. 8 In 1540 the 
commendator built the nave of the church at a great expense, and roofed it with oak; and 
repaired the belfry which had been struck with lightning. 9 The changes which arose on the 
death of King James V. in 1542 interrupted the labours of Ferrerius, and having sent back 
the monks to Beauly, he resolved himself to return to France. 10 In 1543 Sir James Haisty a 
monk of Bewlie found surety before the civil court for his appearance to answer for being art 
and part in the oppression done to Master Gawin Dunbar treasurer of Ross in coming upon 
him with the bishop and his accomplices in the cathedral church, in laying hands upon him, 
and in cruelly wounding him to the effusion of his blood. 11 In 1544 the commendator took 
down the old rickety house of the prior, and built in its stead a large and elegant house with six 
vaults below. 12 Between 1561 and 1566 we have the following rental of the priory given 
up to the collector of thirds by John abbot of Kinloss the commendator ' The rentall of the 
priorie of Bowlyne, baith of the maillis, silver, fearmis, teindis, martis, wedderis, and vtheris 
dewties, as efter followis. The rentall of silver Item in primis the silver maill of the barronie of 
Bewlyne with the maynis of the samin extendis to Ixi lib. Item the kirkis of Convith and Cumer 
sould pay in silver in the yeir the sowme of xxxiii lib. Item the kirk of Abirtarf sould pay in 
silver the sowme of xlii lib. Summa of the haill silver in maillis and teindis extendis to i c xxxvi 
lib. xiii s, iiii d. ; The rentall of the victuall of the said pryorie Item in the haill victuale of the 
barronie of Bowlyne with the maynis of the samin extendis to iiii ch. victuall Item the kirkis of 
Conveith and Cummer in victuale extendis to vii ch. xi bs. Item the twa mylnes of Bowlyne sett 

1 Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. 2 Ibid. 6 Ferrerius, p. 40. 

3 Ibid. * Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. viii. fol. 29. 7 Ibid., pp. 39, 40, 43, 49. 8 Ibid., p. 49. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 125. Keith's Bishops. 9 Ibid., p. 48. 10 Ibid., p. 49. 

Spotiswood. Ferrerii Historia Abbatum de Kynlos, " Pitcairn's Crim. Trials, vol. i. p. 328.* 

p. 40. 12 Ferrerius, p. 48. 



512 ORIGINES [E.ILMOKACK. 

for ii ch. viii bs. meill and malt summa of the haill victuall extendis to xiii ch. iiii bs. victuale ; 
The rentall of aites Item the haill aitis of the said baronie viii bs. ; The mairtis Item in mairtis 
x mairtis ; The muttoun Item in wedderis xx wedderis Item in pultrie xxi dussane ; As for the 
fishing of Bowlyne it is vncertane, sumtyms les, sumtymis mair, and vther tyms verie lytill, and 
thir twa yeiris bygane hes scarslie giwin ii last vi barreillis. And sua the haill priorie of Bewlyn 
extendis veirlie in silver, victuale, and wedderis, aitis, mairtis, pultrie, and salmond, as efter fol- 

lowis Summa of the silver i c xxxvii lib. xiii s. iiii d. Summa of the victuall xiiii ch. iii bs. 

victuale Summa of the haill aitis viii bs Summa of mairtis x mairtis Summa of wedderis xx 

wedderis Summa of pultrie xxi dosan Summa of salmond ii last vi b. Thir ar the thingis that 

are to be deducit of the money, salmond, and victuallis, abone specifeit, pay it as efter followis 
Item in primis to be deducit be payment maid to the aucht brethir for thair habit silver, ilk bredir 
havand in the yeir xl s., quhilk extendis to xvi lib. ; Item thair is to be deducit for the said viii 
brethir for thair flesh and fish in the yeir, ilk brother havand for thair flesh iii d. in the day, for 
thair fish ilk day ii d., extending in the yeir to xxix lib. xiiii s. viii d. ; Item for the Lordis of the 
Seit contributioun yeirlie iiii lib. iiii s. ; Item Master Alexander M'Kenzie for his yeirlie pensioun 
(piliilk he hes of the said pryorie and provydit thairof in Roome xiii lib. vi s. viii d. ; Item to the 
otficiar of Bowlyne yeirlie for his fie quhilk he hes dureing his lyftyme xxv s. viii d. ; Item thair 
is to be deducit for the said aucht bretheris drink in the yeir v xx xii bs. victuale ; Item for thair 
breid in the yeir Ivii bs. iii fir. i pc. ; Item for the officiaris fie i b. ; Item thair is to be deducit for 
the officiaris fie i b. ; Item thair is to be deducit for the teind fish of the kirk of Warlaw iii bs. 3 
barell salmond ; Summa of the haill victuallis and salmond, deducit as is abone writtin, extendis to 
Ixiiii lib. xiii s. of silver, and x ch. x bs. iii fir. i pc. victuale, iii bs. 3 b. salmond ; And sua restis 
to the prior Ixxii lib. xvi d., iii ch. viii bs. iii pcs. victuale, and of salmond ii last ii b. ^ b. salmond. 
Memorandum that the kirk of Conveith was wont to pay for the vicarage thairof the sowme of 
xxvii lib. xiii s. iiii d., and now gettis na payment of the samin. I Jo. abbot of Kinloss 

Memorandum to tak the salmond the thrid, not as it is rentallit, bot as it givis, 

for this rentall is manchlitt Eemember, my lord comptrollar, and speir the rentall 

of thir twa, Kinlos and Bewlyne, for they are suspitious anent the fishing.' 1 In 15G8 Walter 
abbot of Kinloss and prior of Bewlie leased for 19 years to John Clerk in Bewlie, and, he failing, 
to Alexander Clerk his lawful son, and to their heirs of no higher degree than themselves, the 
eighteenth part of the town and lands of Eeyndoun in the barony and priory of Bewlie and 
sheriffdom of Innernes, with the ' pateland ' called John Clerk's land, lying ' betwix our said 
abbaye and place of Bewlie betwix the twa getis eist and west, ascendant up fra the croft 
eallit Alexander Wrichtis croft to the get passand cist and west throch the Cuthill, as the 
said auchtant part and pateland eallit John Wrichtis (Clerkis ?) land lyis in lenth and braid,' 
then and long before occupied by John Clerk, together with the kilnhouse, barn, tofts, wastes, 
and buildings, used and wont, with power to brew and sell the malt made from corn grown 
by themselves, provided they did so without prejudice to the principal alehouse of the priory 

1 Book of Assumptions. 



KILMORACK.] PAEOCHIALES. 513 

the grantees paying yearly for Reyndoun 12s. 6d. Scots, 2 bolls 2 pecks of forme, one firlot 
of oats, one-fourth of a mart, three-fourths of a mutton, 6 poultry, one kid, and 24 eggs valued 
at a penny ; and for the ' pateland ' called John Clerk's land 4 Scots, a dozen of poultry, 

' ane to the water,' and a hook (a reaper) in harvest ; extending in all to 4, 12s. 6d. 

Scots the lease to be void if the dues should remain unpaid for two successive terms. 1 The 
lease is subscribed by abbot Walter, brother John Crawfurde, James Rox, Sir Thomas Taynara 
monk, and George Moray. 2 In 1573 King James VI. appointed Master John Fraser prior and 
commendator of Bewlie, the priorato being vacant by the resignation of Walter abbot of Kinlos. 3 
One of those two priors (it does not appear which) granted to Hew Lord Fraser of Lovat and his 
heirs male the barony, towns, and lands of Bewlie, namely, the village and lands of Ardingrosk ; 
Rewindoun ; Incherorie ; Alter ; Craigscorie ; Plathaycht ; Grome ; Ferinelie with the forests 
and woods ; Thaynok with the pendicles, namely, Ouircroarss, the Relict, and Grenefauld, with 
the cottage of the same ; the lands of Vrquhany with the woods ; the lands called the Half 
Dawaucht ; the lands of Boycht, Couharbrie ; a third of the lands of Mekle Culmulang ; a third 
of Eister Glen of Conveth, and a fourth of the lands of Faynblair ; Fcrriehous with its croft ; 
Ainocht; Auldtoun called the common pasture; Thacfrische with the cottage; the lands called 
Masounland; the lands called John Cuikis land; a croft called M'Hucheonis croft and common 
cottage; the lands called the mains of Bewlie, with the yards and orchards belonging to the 
priory, and the pertinents and crofts of the said lands and lordships ; a croft called Dean James 
Papis croft ; a croft called Merschellis croft ; a croft called M'Alesteris croft, then occupied by 
David Lowsoun ; and also two mills called Thaynok and Bewlie mills, with the thirled multures 
of the whole barony of Bewlie and of all the lands above written with their sequels ; and also 
the whole salmon fishing on the water of Forne, marching from Cairncot to the sea or to any 
other part on the said water among Hew Lord Fraser's fishings of Kilmarok, with the cruves 
and other commodities ; within the priory of Bewlie and sheriffdom of Innernes for the yearly 
payment of 211, 15s. 4 In 1579 King James VI. confirmed the grant, with a special clause 
confirming the yearly payment, and appointing the third of the rental of the fishings to be paid 
according thereto. 5 In 1584 the same king, for the good service done by the deceased Hew 
Lord Fraser of Lovat, and his son and heir Syrnon then Lord Fraser of Lovat, confirmed the 
prior's grant, the seisin given to Hew Lord Fraser, the seisin given to Symon as his son and heir, 
and the King's own charter of 1579, and specially that clause of it relating to the yearly pay 
ment and the collection of the third. 6 An entry in the records of the Scotch parliament, dated 
1612, is as follows ' Ratification to the Lord Hay of Sala of his erection of Beaulie.' 7 The 
remains of the priory church, consisting chiefly of bare walls without sculpture or ornament, are 
still to be seen near the mouth of the Beauly in the east end of the parish. 8 Within it are 
numerous tombstones and monuments, apparently of the Bissets and other early lords of Beauly, 

1 Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. 4 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. iii. p. 357. 

2 Ibid. 6 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. iii. pp. 356, 357. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 43. * Acta Parl. Scot., vol. iv. p. 522. 

* Spotiswood. Acta Parl. Scot, vol. iii. pp. 356, 357. B Anderson, p. 530. New Stat. Ace. 

VOL. II. 3 T 



514 OKIGINES [KILMOHACK. 

and also of the later proprietors the Frasers, the clan Chisholm, and others ; and among the rest 
is the tombstone of Sir Kenneth MacKenzie of Kintail dated 1493. 1 At Wellhouse in the neigh 
bourhood was a consecrated spring, and also a lofty cross, the shaft of which is still to be seen at 
the modern village of Beauly. 2 In the end of last century Beauly was locally known as Vanechan 
(the land of the monks), and the river as Avin-na-manich (the river of the monks). 3 

At the Information the vicarage of Kilmorak was given by Sir Alexander Pedder, in name 
of the vicar Sir John Nicolsoun, as having yielded when leased the sum of 26, 13s. 4d., 
' quhen teindis and oblatiounis was payit.' 4 We have another statement by Master Henry 
Kinros, who says that ' the vicarage of Kilmorak gaif of auld xx lib. in assedatioun, and now 
nothing payit thir tua yeiris quhill vniversall ordour be tane.' 5 

In the Libellus Taxationum the priory of Beuling is valued at 400 marks ; and in the 
Taxatio Sec. xvi. it is rated at 62. c 

Before the thirteenth century the lands of Herkele (Erchless) and of Cumber (Comer), each 
extending to a davach, formed part of the old parish of Conveth (or Conway) in the diocese of 
Moray, the church of which then belonged to the bishop. 7 In the end of the twelfth or beginning 
of the thirteenth century the lauds of the parish were granted in fee to John Byseth (of Lovat). 8 
Between 1203 and 1222 Bricius bishop of Moray had a controversy with John Byseth respecting 
the patronage of the churches of Coneway and Dulbatelauch (now Kirkhill), and the tithes of 
the crown rents due from the lands. 9 It was settled by John Byseth on the one hand resigning 
to the bishop the patronage and ecclesiastical dues of Dulbatelauch, and the bishop on the other 
resigning to him the patronage and dues of Coneway, with the exception of 20s. yearly retained 
by the bishop as the tithe of 10 paid yearly by John Byseth to the King for the lands which 
he held at forme within those parishes. 10 In 1258 a controversy arose between Archibald bishop 
of Moray and the same John Byseth, the former maintaining that a davach of the churchland of 
Cuneway and another davach in Eos called Herchelys belonged to his table, and the latter that 
they belonged to his fief of the Ard the bishop moreover claiming from John Byseth the ' cane ' 
of his land of the Ard and a stone of wax, which he alleged were wont to be paid to himself 
and his predecessors for a long period. 11 Robert bishop of Boss and his dean being appointed 
arbiters in the matter by the Pope (Alexander IV.), the bishop of Moray renounced his claim, 
and John Byseth of his more good will granted to him for ever a yearly revenue of 60 shillings 
sterling from the lands of Munychoc in the Ard. 1 - John Bisset left three daughters, Mary 
(married to Sir David Graham, and afterwards, it is said, to Simon Eraser of Lovat), Cecilia 
(married to Sir William of Fenton), and Elizabeth (married to Sir Andrew de Bosco), each 
of whom seems to have inherited a third of their father's property. 13 The lands of the Ard, 
including Erchless, \vere probably held by Steuene of Arde (how acquired is unknown), whose 

1 Anderson, p. 535. New Stat. Ace. 9 Ibid. ' Ibid. pp. 15, 16, 59, 60. 

2 Anderson, p. 535. " Keg. Moray., pp. 133, 134. 12 Ibid. 

3 Letter of Rev. John M'Queen to General Hutton, u The Familyof Kilravock, pp. 27-29. Shaw's Moray. 
1789. 4 Book of Assumptions. Beauly Charters apurfMacfarlane. Regist. Moraviense, 

Ibid. 6 MSS. in Adv. Lib. pp. 367, 368. Others say that Simon Fraser married 

7 Regist. Moraviense, pp. 15, 5U. 8 Ibid. the daughter of Mary Bisset. 



KILMORACK.J PAROCHIALES. 515 

son William, designated of the county of Innernesse, swore fealty to King Edward I. in 1296 ; 
and also by Sir Cristin of Ard, who appears in record from that year to 1366, and whose son 
John appears between 1296 and 1325. 1 In 1309 King Robert Bruce granted to Hugh of Ross 
the lands of Straglass (probably including Erchless). 2 Weland of Ard (of what descent does 
not appear) married Matilda, the only daughter of Malise Earl of Stratherne by his first wife 
Matilda the daughter of the Earl of Menteth. 3 Their son Alexander of Ard inherited in right 
of his mother the earldoms of Stratherne and Caithness, and lands in Banff, Sutherland, and 
Orkney, all which he resigned apparently between the years 1375 and 1377.* He appears to 
have previously resigned the lands of the Ard, and died without issue. 5 About 20 years before 
his resignation of the other lands the three portioners of the Ard were William of Fenton 
lord of Bewfourd, Hugh Eraser Lord of Loveth, and Alexander of Chesolme. 6 In the year 
1368, on the feast of the Blessed Trinity, in the chamber of Alexander bishop of Moray at 
Spyny, in the presence of the whole multitude of canons and chaplains and others invited 
thither to dinner, Alexander of Chesolme portioner of the Ard with joined hands and 
uncovered head did homage to the bishop for the lands of the Ess and of Kyntallirgy. 7 
Between the years 1360 and 1398 there appear in record John of the Ard subchanter 
of Moray, William of Chesholme treasurer, and Thomas of Chesholm, a person of some 
consequence at the time, all by birth apparently connected with the families of the 
Ard. 8 In 1394, in an agreement made between Thomas of Dunbar Earl of Moray and 
Alexander of the Isles lord of Lochalse, by which it was settled that Alexander of the Isles 
should have the custody of all the lands of the regality of Moray and the ecclesiastical lands, 
there were excepted the lands of Hugh Fraser, Thomas of Cheshelme, and Sir William of 
Fodrynham (apparently the portioners of the Ard) ; among whom there was a certain agreement 
concerning their lands. 9 In 1398 there occurs in record John of Cheshelm of the Arde. 10 In 
1401, by an indenture dated at Dvnbathlach between Margaret of the Ard lady of that Ilk and 
Angus the son of Goffred of He, it was agreed that Angus should marry Margaret the Young 
the daughter of the lady Margaret of the Ard, with whom he should have from her mother 15 
marklands, namely, the davach of Croychel and the half davach of Comyr Kynbady, within the 
bounds of Strathglas, to be held by Angus and his heirs by Margaret that, should Margaret 

1 Ragman Rolls, p. 161. Palg. Illust. vol. i. p. 314. mentioned in the succeeding note, but it is not cer- 
Rob. Index, p. 16, nn. 11, 12; p. 20, no. 5. Regis- tainly known how he inherited the lands of tbe Ard. 
trum de Aberbrothoc, vol. i. pp. 305-307 ; vol. ii. pp. 8 Regist. Moray., pp. 130, 174, 180-183, 202, 203, 
4, 5. Regist. Morav., pp. 306, 317. Beauly Charters. 213, 304, 324, 326-8, 354. At the same period Sir 

2 Rob. Index, p. 2, no. 60. Robert of Chishelme of that Ilk, lord of Quarelwode 

3 Lib. Ins. Missarum, p. liv. in Moray, held lands of the bishop to the south of In- 

4 Ibid. Rob. Index, p. 120, nn. 45, 46, 59, 60 ; p. 129, verness. Ibid. p. 197. Rob. Index, p. 134, no. 39. 

nn. 27, 28. 9 Regist. Morav., p. 354. Thomas Earl of Dunbar 

5 Lib. Ins. Missarum, p. liv. Regist. Morav., p. 369. (in 1420) is said to have granted to Hugh Lord Lovat, 

6 Regist. Moraviense, pp. 367-309. who married his daughter, the superiority of the ' Braes 

7 Regist. Morav. p. 369. This Alexander is supposed of the Aird,' which belonged of old to Alexander of 
to have been the husband of Margaret of the Ard Chesholm lord of Kinrossie. MS. cited in letter to 
afterwards mentioned. He appears to have been the Editor by E. Batten. 

son or grandson of Sir Robert Chesholm of Quarelwode 10 Reg. Morav., p. 211. 



516 ORIGINES [KILMORACK. 

die without heirs, the half of those lands and the half of the goods then jointly possessed by 
Angus and his wife should revert to the lady Margaret and her heirs, the other half to remain 
with Angus for life that after his death the whole should freely revert to the lady Margaret 
and her sons for recovery of the davach of Brebach Carynnes and Innvyrnavyr in Strathnavyr, 
the two Gartyis in the earldom of Suthyrland, and Larnyse in the earldom of Caithness and 
that, in so far as the lady Margaret and her sons might recover the said lands through the 
advice, assistance, and power of Angus, he and his heirs by her daughter Margaret should have 
the fourth part of the recovered lands, and the other three-fourths should remain with the 
lady Margaret and her sons ; the entry of Angus to be at the feast of Pentecost following, so 
that the fermes of that term should remain with the lady Margaret, and that the lands should 
thenceforth be at the will of Angus. 1 In 1403, by an indenture dated at Kinrossy in the barony 
of Cullace (in Perthshire) between William of Fentoun of Baky on the one side and Margaret 
of the Ard of Ercles and Thomas of Cheisholm her son and heir on the other, dividing between 
them the lands of which they were heirs portioners, and which lay in the sheriffdoms of Perth, 
Forfar, Lanark, Aberdeen, and Inverness, it was agreed that the lands of the Ard should stand 
divided as of old. 2 Between the years 1406 and 1415 the agreement was confirmed by Eobert 
Duke of Albany Eegent of Scotland. 3 Between 1406 and 1410 the Regent granted the lands 
of Straglashe to Eupham Leslie Countess of Boss, with remainder to John Stewart Earl of 
Buchan and to Robert Stewart his brother, and they failing the lands were to revert to the crown. 4 
In 1464 John of Halyburtoun of the Arde or of Kynrossy was prosecuted by the abbot of 
Abirbrothoc for alienating the lands of Bucht which he held of the abbot. 5 In the year 1492 
Alexander and William of Cheshelm appear among the arbiters in a dispute between Andrew 
bishop of Moray and Hugh Ros baron of Kilravok. 6 In 1512 King James IV. granted in 
heritage to James Haliburtoun of Gask certain lands in the barony of Ard and sheriffdom 
of Innernys, and the lands of the two Arcles in the earldom of Ross, which he had resigned 
and erected into the free barony of Arcles the same lands, together with the lands of Kirk- 
toun and Inglistouu in the barony of Ard, and the lands of Westir Strus, Estir Strus, 
Culguyry, Estir Croychcll, Westir Croychell, Westir Comyr, Kilbaddy, and Dalheny, with the 
fishings and outsets of the same, lying in Strathglasch, in the earldom of Ross, and in the 
sheriffdom of Innernys, which formerly belonged to James Haliburtoun in heritage, and after 
alienation by him had been redeemed granting to him all the King's right and title to the 
lands and their fermes, which he had by reason of the forfeiture of the Earls of Moray or of 
Ross, of whom they were formerly held. 7 In 1513 the same king confirmed the indenture of 
1403. 8 In 1529 James Haliburtoun of Gask resigned the lands granted to him in 1512, which 
King James V. then granted in heritage to Hugh Fraser of Lovat. 9 In 1539 King James 

1 Lib. Ins. Missarum. pp. 1., li. Pitsligo Charters. 6 Reg. Mor., pp. 237-239, 241, 243, 244. 

2 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xviii. no. 138. Rob. Index, p. 7 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xviii. no. 53. Reg. Sec. Sig.. 
167, no. 21. 3 R ol) . l n a eX) p. 167, no. 21. vol. iv. fol. 185. 

1 Rob. Index, p. 161, no. 7. 8 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xviii. no. 138. 

* Regist. de Aberbrothoc, vol. ii. pp. 138-140. 9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 272. 



KILMOBACK.] PAROCHIALES. 517 

granted to Hugh Lord Frasare of Lovet and his male heirs of the name and arms of Frasere, 
with remainder to his heirs whomsoever, the lands and baronies of Lovet, Strathawrick, Ard, 
Abirtarff, Hereiclis or Straglass, the fishings in the water of Forne, the lands of Comerkle in 
the barony of the Ard, and other lands in the sherifldom of Innernys the lands of Comerkle 
and some others having been apprised in the hands of King James IV. for certain sums of money 
due to him by the deceased Thomas Lord Lovet, and the rest resigned by Hugh and the whole 
were then erected into the free barony of Lovet. 1 

In 1500 Welland Chesholme of Comar appears as party in a raid against the lands of Ardma- 
nach and the Redecastell. 2 In 1513 King James IV. granted in heritage to Wiland Chesholm of 
Comyr the lands of Knockfyn, Commyrmor, the two Inverchaynayas, and the two Brekachyis, in 
Straglasch in the earldom of Ross, which Wiland had resigned to the King as Earl. 3 In 1539 
King James V. granted in heritage to John Chesholme, the son and apparent heir of Wiland 
Chesholme of Comyr, the lands of Knokfyn, Comermore, the two Innerchannais, and the two 
Brakachies, with the outsets and the forests of Affrik, Cullove, and Bramulich, in Straglasche in 
the earldom of Ross, which formerly belonged to Wiland Chesholme, and were apprised in the 
hands of King James IV. for certain sums of money due to him by Wiland, and which King 
James V. then united into the barony of Comermore. 4 In 1555 Queen Mary granted to John 
Earl of Suthirland the lands of Comyr Straglasche and all others belonging to the deceased John 
Cheisholme of Comyr, in her hands since his decease. 5 In 1577 King James VI. confirmed a 
grant in liferent by Alexander Chisholme of Comber to Jonet M'Kenze the sister german of Colin 
M'Kenze of Kintaill, of the lands and mill of Brakeches in the earldom of Ross, to be held of the 
crown. 6 In 1584 appear in record Alexander Cheisholme of Cwmer and Wiland (Vallanus) 
Cheisholme his youngest son. 7 In 1590 John Chisholm was served heir to his father Alexander 
Chisholme of Commirmore in the lands of Knokfyne, Commirtnore, the two Innerchannais with 
the mill, Brakacheis, the woods and forest of Auffrage, Cawlloue, and Bramaleche, extending 
to three davachs, united into the barony of Commermoir, lying in Strathglass, in the earldom 
of Ross, and, excepting the lands of Wester Innerchannay with the mill, and the lands of 
Comirmoir, of the old extent of 4. 8 

There seems to have been a town or village at Beauly in 1562. 9 There is a modem village 
in the neighbourhood, but apparently not on the same site. 10 

Fairs are held at Beauly in May, August, October, and November. 11 The Muir of Ord 
Market is held on the third Wednesday of April, on the second Wednesday of May, on the 
third Wednesday of June, on the third Tuesday of July, on the third Tuesday of August, on 
the third Tuesday of September, on the third Tuesday of October, and on the second Wednesday 
of November. 12 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvi. no. 244. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliv. fol. 50. 

a Kilravock Charters. 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 40. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xix. no. 3. 8 Retours. 

* Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvii. no. 14. Reg. Sec. Sig., 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxi. fol. 481. 
vol. xii. fol. 82. 10 New Stat. Ace. Anderson, p. 531. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxvii. fol. 103. u New Stat. Ace. 12 Ibid. 



518 ORIGINES [URRAY. 

Erchless Castle, the seat of the Chisholms, built between 1594 and 1610, lies on the Beauly, 
where its stream is formed by the union of the Glass and the Farrar, about five miles above 
Kilmorack, and near an eminence the site of an older building and now enclosed as a family 
cemetery. 1 

On the Muir of Ord are two upright stones, 6 feet high, said to commemorate some feat 
of warfare. 2 

In different parts of the parish are the sites or remains of cairns, and the ruins of small hill forts. 3 



URRAY. 

Vrray 4 Wrray, Vim-ay 3 Urray. 6 (Map, No. 23.) 

THIS parish, now united with Kilchrist (or Tarradale) is chiefly a well cultivated plain with 
patches of wood and moor interspersed, stretching from east to west along the banks of the 
rivers Conan and Orriu, which meet about its centre." It includes also a davach of land in 
Strathconan, distant about 10 miles from the rest of the parish. 8 

The church of Urrav was the prebend of the subchanter of Ross, and was from 1541 to 1561 
or longer held by Master David Haliburtoun. 9 In 1546 Queen Mary presented Donald Symsoun 
to the vicarage of Vrray, when it should be vacant by the demission or decease of Sir Alexander 
Gray, collation to the benefice during the vacancy of the see belonging to the cardinal of Saint 
Andrews. 10 In 1548 the same queen presented Sir Andrew Dow chaplain to the vicarage, vacant 
or when vacant bv the resignation of Master John Carncors precentor of Ross, collation in this 
case (the see being still vacant) belonging to Master Kentigern Monypenny dean and vicar 
general of Ross. 11 At the Reformation the vicar was Sir Alexander Peddir, who in the rental of 
the assumption of thirds (1561-1566) is stated to have been vicar ' the space of thir four yeiris 
bygane or thairby.' 12 In 1569 (11 October) King James VI. presented Alexander Greirsoun to 
the vicarage of Vrray, vacant by the decease of Sir Alexander Pedder. 13 In the same year (13 
December) he presented to the vicarage, vacant by the decease of the same Alexander, Donald 
Adamsoun exhorter at the kirks of Dingwell and Vrray. 14 In 1573 the same king presented 
Donald Adamesoun minister at Vrray to the parsonage of Vrray, ' quhilk is the subchanterie of 
Ros, quhilk pertenit of befoir to Mr. Dauid Halyburtoun provest of Methven, and throw his inobe- 
dience and nocht geving of his assent and subscribing the actis of religioun contenit in the actis 

1 Anderson's Guide, p. 535. County Maps. Paper 1574. Book of Assignations. A. D. 1576. Ibid. A. D. 

in Inverness Courier, 6 September 1849. 1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 

3 New Slat. Ace. 3 Old Stat. Ace. " Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. County Maps. 

' A. D. 1546. Reg. See. Sig., vol. xix. fol. 65. A. D. f Old and New Stat. Ace. 

1548. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 75. A. D. 1561- 9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvii. no. 159. Book of A- 

1566. Book of Assumptions. A. D. 1569. Reg. Sec. sumptions. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. foL 107. 

Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 96. A. D. 1573. Reg. Sec. Sig.. I0 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. six. fol. 65. 

vol. xli. fol. 107. A. D. 1579. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvL Reg. Sec. Sig.. vol. xxi. fol. 75. 

fol. 62. 5 A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumption?. >- Book of Assumptions. 

6 Circa A. D. 1569. Register of Ministers. A. D. 13 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 96. " IbiJ. 



PAROCHIALES. r-19 

of parliament, and for Don-geving of his aith for acknawleging of oure Souerane Lord and his 
authoritie and dew obedience, and for not bringing of ane testimonial! in writ thairvpoun and not 
raiding of the same oppinlie on sum Sonday in tyme of publict prayeris or sermon in the kirkis of 
the said subchanterie, and nocht geving of his aith of new agane in the saidis kirkis within the 
tvme prefisit in the act of parliament, is now vacand ipto facto and beeum in oure Souerane 
Lordis handis.' 1 In 1574 Donald Adamsoun (the presentee of the former year) was minister at 
Urray, Contane. Kirkchrist, and Foddertie, and Angus M'Xeill M'Kenzie was reader at Urray. 2 
In 1-579 King James VL presented William Kitchie to the vicarage of Vrray, then vacant by the 
demission of Donald Adan>esoun. s 

The church, apparently built about the year 1 780. stands near the confluence of the Conan and 
the Orrin (styled by Blaeu Avon Forbarin), but, from the frequent shifting of the bed of the latter. 
probably not on the original site. 4 

On a hillock among the woods of Conanhouse. at one time an island in the river, are a 
ruined chapel and its cemetery. s 

In Baiamund the subchantry of Ross is taxed at 4 ; in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued 
at 40.* At the Reformation the rental of the parsonage of Vrray, presented by Mr John 
Dumbar, was in effect as follows The teinds of Brain extending yearly to 20 marks : Rmgis 
Vrray 11 marks; Arckyne 26 marks: Eistir Farbrowne 5 marks: Andirquhenren 40s.: Kill- 
quhilliedrum 7 marks ; Mekill Moy with Murdoch M^Cerme's feu lands 50 ; in all 102, 13s. 4d. : 
At the same date Sir Alexander Peddir the vicar states that the vicarage * was quhen guid pay 
ment was maid worth yeirlie xx lib., and now nothing gottin thir thrie yeiris." 8 Between 1569 
and 1573 Donald Adamsone exhorter had as his stipend 4-0 (apparently the parsonage'), and 
8, 7s. Id. the amount of the vicanure. 9 In 1574 and 1576 the same Donald Adamsoun as 
minister had for his stipend 102, 13s, 4d.. the kirklands, and apparently other perquisites, and 
the reader had yearly 16. lf 

In the year 1370 William Earl of Boss granted to William of Ross, the son and heir of the 
deceased Hugh of Boss, the half davach of Moy in the mairdom (maragium) of Strapeffer. 11 
Among the lands granted bv Kine James EH. to Elizabeth Countess of Ross in 1476. and con 
firmed to her by that kinsr in 1477. were included Owra, Ballibrahede, Hileuldrum, Ballingovne. 
and Balliblare. 1J In the tenandry of Culmelloquhy. granted by King James V. to Walter Innes 
of Tulchis in 1526 and 1527, were included the mill of Kilquhillodrum with its land and houses. 
and the lands of Ord, extending respectively in the king's rental to 3 and 26s. 8d.. the respec 
tive yearly payments according to the grant of 1527 being 4, 6s. Sd, and 40s. 1 " In the latter 

: Reg. See. Sig., voL ill. foL 107. E MSS. in Adv. Lib. 

1 Book of Assignations. " Book of Assumptions. f Ibid. 

s Reg. Sec. Sig., voL ilvi. foL 62. ! Register of Ministers. 

4 Maffarlane. Old StaL Ace. New Stat Ace. ! " Book of Assignations. :: Balnapown Charters. 
Gouty Maps. - Reg. Mag. Sig.. lib. vii DO. 371 : lib. viii. no. 40. 

5 My Scnools and Schoolmasters, p. 187. About Se* DISGWALL. pp. 488. 489. 

tie year 1821 the font of the chapel remained, and ls R*g. Mag. Sig.. lib. ni. no. 7 : lib. jmi. no. 4. Reg. 
was connected with a curious local tradition. Ibid. Sec. Sig., voL vt foL 34 ; voL vii. fol. 34. Acta Parl. 
pp. 1JM, 195. Scot.. voL ii. p. 317. See ALKESS. p. 474. 



520 ORIGINES [URBAY. 

year the same king granted to William Dingvale of Kildun the lands of Westir Ferburn and 
Middill Ferburn, extending in the King's rental to 10 marks, and the fishing of the Esche of 
Balbrait extending to 2 marks, included in the same grant with other lands extending in all to 
23, 13s. 4d., 4 bolls victual, and a mart. 1 In 1528 King James V. granted to Walter Innes of 
Towchis the lands of Culcragy and Kirkfarbarne in the earldom of Eoss, and annexed them to 
the tcnandry of Culmaloquhy. 2 In the same year he granted to John M'Kinze of Kintaill the 
4 land of Killequhildrum, and to William M'Culloch the lands of Mekill Moy, the latter grantee 
paying yearly 10 marks 8 shillings, 8 bolls of bear, 8 bolls of meal, 8 bolls of oats, 2 marts, and 

2 muttons, to augment the King's rental by 13s. 4d. in ferme and grassum. 3 In 1538 the King 
granted to Walter Innes for five years the lands of Fairburnegleis, Ord, and the mill and alehouse 
of Kilquhilladrum, with other lands. 4 In 1542 (1 April) he granted in heritage to his servitor 
Murdoch M'Kenzc the lands of Ferbrune, extending yearly in his rental, in ferme, grassum, bon 
dage silver, and other profits, to 5, 16s. and one reek hen the lands of Kirkferbrune or 
Ferbrune-ne-egles, extending to 3, 8s. and a reek hen the lands of Auchnasoill, extending to 
3, 5s. 4d., 3 bolls of meal, 3 bolls of oats, a mart, a mutton, and 4 reek hens the lands of 
Ballabraid, extending to 6, 4s. 4d. and 8 reek hens and the fishing of Ballabraid called the 
Ess, extending to 3, 4s. Scots the grantee paying yearly for the whole 23, 11s. 4d., 3 bolls 
of bear, 3 bolls of meal, 3 bolls of oats, or 6s. 8d. for each boll, a mart or 2 marks, a mutton or 

3 shillings, and 14 reek hens or 4d. for each, in order to augment the King's rental by 13s. 4d. 5 
In the same year (28 July) King James granted to the same Murdoch the lands of Myd Fair- 
brone, Kirk Fairbrone alias Eglis, Auclmasowle, Ballabraid, the fishing of Ballabraid called the 
Ess, and the lands of Moymoir, for the yearly payment of 30, 17s. 4d., 9 bolls of bear, 9 bolls 
of oat meal, 9 bolls of oats, 3 muttons, 3 marts, and 23 reek hens, to augment his rental by the 
sum of 26s. 8d. 6 In 1549 Queen Mary granted to Murdach M'Kenze of Farebren and Meriobel 
Vrquhart his wife the lands of Ballevrayd of the new extent of 8, and the 40 shilling lands 
of Moy, in the earldom of Ross, which Murdach had resigned. 7 In 1555 Murdoch M'Kenze of 
Farabren witnesses a charter of Thomas Dingwell of Kildun. 8 In 1584 King James VI. granted 
in heritage to Sir Andrew Keith certain lands, including those of Wester Fairbarne and Arcon ; 
the grantee paying yearly for Wester Fairbarne 4, 10s. with 8 shillings of bondage silver and 
one reek hen and for Arcon 4, 4s. 4d., 12 bolls of bear, 12 bolls of oatmeal, 6 bolls of oats, 2 
marts, 2 muttons, 8s. of bondage silver, 8 reek hens, 2 loads of fir, 60 ' girthstingis,' 60 loads 
of turfs or peats, vulgo ' fewall,' as good and sufficient as in Ardmannoch, and 100 draughts 
of the said fuel. 9 In the same year King James confirmed a charter of John bishop of Ross, 
granting to Alexander Baync of Tullich and Agnes Fraser his wife, and to their heirs born 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 36. Reg. Sec. Sig., 5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 174. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

vol. vi. fol. 53 ; vol. vii. fol. 57. vol. xv. fol. 100. 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 133. See ALNESS, 6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 289. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

p. 474. vol. xvi. fol. 36. 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxii. fol. 72. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. un. 249, 250. Reg. Sec. * Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 269. 

Sig., vol. viii. foL 14. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. ff. 87, 88. See DINOWALL, 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xi. fol. 75. p. 491. 



URRAY.] PAROCHIALES. 521 

between them, with remainder to Alexander's heirs whomsoever, the lands of Vrray, extending to 
a quarter davach, then in Alexander's hands ; and also a charter by the same bishop, granting to 
Alexander M'Culloch of Stronnomadie for life, and to William M'Culloch his first-born son and his 
heirs male, with remainder to his second son Duncan and his heirs male, his third son Alexander 
and his heirs male, his fourth son (unnamed) and his heirs male, and to the male heirs whomso 
ever of the elder Alexander, the lands of Litill Moy, extending to the fourth of a davach, then 
occupied by Alexander, with the salmon fishing on the water of Connan belonging to the lands, 
if any. 1 In 1586 the same king granted in heritage to William Keith the master of his wardrobe, 
for his good service and other causes, certain lands in Eoss, including Vrra, Kilquhillardrum, 
Ord with the mill and alehouse of Bawblair, Balnagoun, and others ; the grantee paying 
yearly for Vrra 40s., with 4s. of bondage silver, and 4 poultry, and every five years 4 as grassum 
for Kilquhillardrum 6, with 8s. of bondage silver, a reek hen, and 6 as grassum for Ord 
40s., with 4s. of bondage silver, 8 poultry, 26s. 8d. grassum, and the usual services for the mill 
of Kilquhillardrum with the multures, 2 chalders victual half bear half meal, and for the alehouse 
40s., with the same sum as grassum for Bawblair 40s., with 2s. of bondage silver, one poultry, 
40s. of grassum, and the usual services and for Balnagown 46s. 8d., with 4s. of bondage silver, 
2 reek hens, 46s. 8d. grassum, and the usual services. 2 In 1590 Alexander M'Kenzie was served 
heir to his father Murdoc M'Kenze of Ferbrone in the lands of Mid Ferbrone of the extent of 
5, 16s. feuferme, the lands of Kyrk Ferbrone alias Eglis of the extent of 3 and other dues, the 
lands of Auchinsaull of the extent of 3, 5s. 4d. feuferme, the lands of Ballebraid of the extent of 
7, 4s. feuferme, the fishing of Ballebraid called the Es of the extent of 3, 4s. feuferme, and 
the lands of Moymoir of the extent of 6, 13s. 4d. 3 In 1619 Colin lord of Kintail was served 
heir male to his grandfather Colin Makkeinzie of Kyntail in the lordship and barony of Dinguall, 
including the lands of Wester Fairbrune of the extent of 4, 13s. and other dues, and the lands 
of Arcon of the extent of 4, 4s. 4d. 4 

In 1526 King James V. granted to his familiar servitor Eobert Gib the lands of Branmore 
in the lordship of Ros, extending in the King's rental to 6 yearly, for the yearly payment of 
10 marks. 5 In 1538 he granted to the same Robert the same lands, extending yearly to 10 
marks 10 shillings and 8 pence, for the yearly payment of 10 marks 17 shillings in augmentation 
of his rental by 6s. 4d. 6 In 1541 the same king granted to John M'Kenze of Kintale the lands 
of Mekill Brawane, extending yearly to 6 in the King's rental, and in grassum and other dues 
to 24 shillings, for the yearly payment of 8 Scots in augmentation of the rental by 16 shillings. 7 
In 1542 he granted to Duncan Bayne the lands of Tulche and others, with the astricted multures 
and suckin of certain other lands including Brawane. 8 In 1543 Queen Mary granted in heritage 
to Kenneth Mackenze the son and apparent heir of John Mackenze of Kintaill, and to Isabel 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. ff. 34, 41. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xi. fol. 72. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. ff. 46-48. 7 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 51. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

3 Retours. Ibid. vol. xv. fol. 29. 

5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 133. Reg. Sec. Sig., 8 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 306. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vol. vi. fol. 20; vol. vii. fol. 19. vol. xvi. fol. 36. 

VOL. II. 3 U 



522 ORIGINES [KILCHRIST. 

Stewart his wife, the lands of Mekill Braane in the lordship of Ross, which with other lands 
extending to 36 marks John Mackenze had resigned. 1 In 1554 and 1557 Kenneth Mackenze 
of Brahan appears in record. 2 In 1574 Colin M'Keinzie of Kintaill was served heir to Kenneth 
M'Keinzie his father in the lands of Meikill Brayne in the earldom of Eoss, of the old extent 
of 8. 3 In 1600 Duncan Bane of Tullich was served heir to his father Alexander Bane of 
Tullich in the astricted multures and suckin of the lands of Brawane. 4 

On the left bank of the river Orrin stands the ruined tower of Fail-burn (of old Ferbrune, 
Ferbarin, or Forbarin, originally built without a door, and accessible only by a ladder through 
one of the windows.) 5 

On the north of the Conan is Brahan Castle, the seat of the Mackenzies. 6 In a barrow near 
it, opened during the last century, was found an urn, polished or varnished inside and outside, 
and containing a few pieces of bone. 7 Other barrows opened about the same date contained 
human bones, and fragments of armour apparently of copper. 8 



KILCHRIST. 

Taruedal 9 Tarridie 10 Kylcliristan 11 Kirkchrist 12 Killecreist 13 
Kilchrist. 14 (Map, No. 24.) 

THIS parish, now united to Urray, seems to have included only a small district (anciently known 
as Taruedal or Tarradale), forming the south east portion of the united parish, and bounded on 
the south by the Moray Firth. 

Among the witnesses to a grant in favour of the chaplain of Saint Peter at Duffus (in Moray), 
made in 1240 by Walter de Moravia the son of Hugh do Moravia, appears Ada the chaplain 
rector of Taruedal. 18 In 1274 a controversy which had arisen between the prior of Beauly and 
Master Henry of Fottyngham rector of the church of Taruedal was settled as follows ; That the 
prior should freely have the tithes of all the land belonging to the church for a term of eight 
years from the feast of Pentecost 1275 that during that time he should entertain at his own 
expense the said Master Henry with two horses and two grooms for the half of each year 
and that during the same period Master Henry should protect and faithfully serve the prior and 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 524. Reg. Sec. Sig., 9 A. D. 1240. Reg. Morav. p. 275. A. D. 1274. 
vol. xvii. fol. 56. B -auly Charters apwd Maefarlanu. In the Reg. Morav. 



2 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 359 ; lib. xxxii. no. tl 
211. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxviii. t'ol. 54. 

Retours. < Ibid. 

5 Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. Old Stat. Ace. New 
Stat. Ace. County Maps. Miller's ' Schools and 
Schoolmasters,' p. 138. 



vord is misprinted Carnedal. 
A. D. 1372. Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 
Circa A. D. 1569. Register of Ministers. 
A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. 
A. D. 1584. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 90. 
A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 



6 Old Stat. Ace. A. D. 1603. Gregory, pp. 302, 303. 

7 Ibid. 8 i b id. 15 n e g. Morav., p. 275. 



KILCHBIST.] PAROCHIALES. 523 

convent as often as required. 1 In the year 1372 William Earl of Eoss is said to have granted 
' the kirk of Tarridie in Ross' to the canons of Fearn. 2 About the year 1569 Master Alexander 
Makkenze was reader at Kyllarnane and Kylchristan. 3 In 1574 the churches of Urray, Contane, 
Kirkchrist, and Foddertie, were under one minister, and the office of reader at Kirkchrist was 
vacant.* In 1584 King James VI. confirmed a charter by Alexander Home canon of the church 
of Ross, granting with consent of the dean and chapter to George Monro of Dalquhartie in 
heritage the churchlands of his prebend called Killecreist with the parsonage tithes included, 
lying in the earldom of Ross and sheriffdom of Innernes, and also the prebendary's manse 
with its pertinents lying as above. 5 

The church, dedicated to the Saviour, stood about three miles south east from the church 
of Urray, where its ruins and cemetery still remain. 6 

About 1569 the reader at Kyllarnane and Kylchristan had for his stipend 20. 7 In 1574 
Donald Adamsoun, minister at Kirkchrist and other churches, had for his stipend 102, 13s. 4d., 
the kirklands, and other dues; and the reader at Kirkchrist had 20 marks and the kirklands. 8 

Between the years 1275 and 1294 David of Innerlunan, with the consent of Gillicrist Macgilli- 
duff, quit-claimed to the monks of Beauly his land of Ouchterwaddale (or Onachtervadal) extend 
ing to a half davach, which he held on lease from Gillicrist, who granted the land to the monks. 9 
In 1309 King Robert Bruce granted to Hugh Ross the lands of Taruedelle and Inuerasren. 10 In 
1476, on the forfeiture of John Earl of Ross and Lord of the Isles, King James III. granted to 
Elizabeth Countess of Ross for her maintenance certain lands, including Ballingovne, Hiltoun- 
tardel, Balliblare, and the lands of the castle of Tardale, in the earldom of Ross, which she had in 
conjunct infeftment with her husband before his forfeiture. 11 In 1477 on attaining his majority 
he confirmed the grant. 12 In 1526 and 1527 the mill of Tarradale, and the lands, crofts, and 
houses, were included in the tenandry of Culmelloquhy granted by James V. to Walter Innes of 
Tulchis, the grantee paying yearly in 1526 the sum of 26s. 8d., and in 1527 the sum of 33s. 4d. 13 
In 1538 the mill was included in a grant of the same lands for 5 years by the same king to the 
same Walter. 1 * In 1586 King James VI. granted in heritage to William Keith the master of his 
wardrobe certain lands in Ross, including Bawblair, Balnagown, Balnaknok, and Tarradaill with 
the mill ; the grantee paying yearly for Balnaknok or Hiltoun of Tarradaill 46s. 8d., with 4s. of 
bondage silver, 4 reek hens, 60 loads of peats, with the usual services, and 46s. 8d. every five 



1 Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. This agree- 8 Book of Assignations. 

ment is witnessed by Sir William the dean of Moray, 9 Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. The charter of 

Sir Walter Sureys the official of Moray, Sir Robert David of Innerlunan had the seal of Walter de Moravia 

the vicar of Duff 1ms, Sir William the prior of Plus- appended, and was witnessed by Sir Andrew de Mo- 

cardyn, and Robert of Bosyll his fellow monk. ravia. 

8 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 10 Rob. Index, p. 2, no. 59. 

3 Register of Ministers. " Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. no. 371. 

* Book of Assignations. lz Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. viii. no. 40. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 90. 13 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 7 ; lib. xxii. no. 4. 

6 Macfarlane. New Stat. Ace. County Maps. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. vi. fol. 34; vol. vii. fol. 34. See 
Miller's ' Schools and Schoolmasters,' pp. 167, 168. ALNESS, p. 474. 

7 Register of Ministers. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xi. fol. 75. 



524 ORIGINES [KILLEARNAN. 

years -as grassum for Tarradaill with the alehouse 5, 6s. 8d., one poultry, 8s. of bondage 
silver, 5, 6s. 8d. as grassum, and the usual services and for the mill of Tarradaill with the 
multures and croft 33s. 4d. x In 1599, by a contract between William Eos of Kilravok and Rorie 
M'Kcnyie of Ardafailie, it was agreed that Murdoch the son and apparent heir of Rorie should 
marry Margaret the daughter of William Ros ; that Rorie should infeft Murdoch and Margaret 
in certain lands, including the quarter lands of the Hiltoun of Tarradcll ; and that William should 
pay to Rorie and his daughter 4500 marks Scots. 2 In 1635 Alexander Bayne was served heir 
male and of provision to his father Duncan Bayne of Tullich in the half davach of Tarradill with 
the alehouse and its croft, in the barony of Delny then newly erected, of the extent of 6, 16s. 
and other dues. 3 

In the year 1278 a charter by Andrew de Boscho and Elizabeth his wife to the monks of 
Beauly, dated at Eddyrdor, is witnessed by Colin Gove the constable of Taruedal. 4 The eastle 
of Tardale, as we have seen, occurs in record in 1476. ' Two myl thence (that is, from Killear- 
nan),' says a writer of the seventeenth century, ' Tarradill with the old castle of Tarradill ; a myl 
thence is Kilchrist with a kirk.' 6 

' Two myl thence,' continues the same writer, is ' Achaiohroisk with rnanie ancient monu 
ments betwix.' 7 

In 1603 the Clanranald of Glengarry plundered the lands of Kilchrist and the adjacent lands 
belonging to the Mackenzies, and the inhabitants, who were assembled in the church, were 
there burned to death by the invaders, whose piper meanwhile marched round the building 
playing a pibroch which has since been known under the name of Kilchrist as the family 
tune of the Clanranald. 8 



KILLEARNAN. 

Eddyrdor 9 Kilemane 10 Kyllarnane 11 Killemane 12 Kirewran I3 
Killearnan. 1 * (Map, No. 25.) 

IN 1756 a part of Kilmuir Wester and a part of Suddy (which in that year were united, and 
which bound Killearnan on the east and north east) were annexed to Killearnan, and a part of 
the latter was annexed to the united parish. 15 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv.ff. 46-48. SeeUaKAY,p.521. ' A. D. 1278. Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. 

1 Kilravock Charters. 3 Retours. <> A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. 

4 Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. ' Circa A. D. 1569. Register of Ministers. 

5 See above. 2 A. D. 1574-1576. Book of Assignations. 

6 Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 'Ibid. :i A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 
8 Gregory, p. 302, and authorities there cited. ' My * A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlaue's Geog. Collect. 

Schools and Schoolmasters,' p. 168. 5 Old Stat. Ace. 



KILLEARNAN.] PAROCHIALES. 525 

The parish of Killearnan rises gradually from the shore of the Moray Firth (here called the 
Beauly Firth or Loch Beauly) to the middle of an extensive moor named the Mulbuy (known of 
old as Ardmeanach, the central ridge, a name which was applied to the whole peninsula now 
called the Black Isle). 1 

In the year 1278 a charter of Andrew de Boscho and Elisabeth his wife is witnessed bv 
William the vicar of Eddyrdor. 2 The church, afterwards styled Killearnan, was part of the pre 
bend of the archdeacon of Ross. 3 In 1574 and 1576 Robert Grahame, archdeacon, was minister 
at Killernane, and Alexander Mackenzie was reader. 4 

The church stands on a small eminence on the shore. 5 It is cruciform, and was originally 
thatched with heather, but in the end of the last century had its walls heightened and was roofed 
with slates. 6 

At Redcastle about half a mile west from the church stood a chapel dedicated to Saint 
Andrew, at which a fair was of old held about Lammas (1 August). 7 

At Spittal there is said to have been a religious foundation belonging to the Knights Hospi 
tallers. 8 The lands of Spittall occur in record in 1599. 9 

There was a chaplainry in the cathedral church of Ross founded on the lands of Ardafalie 
in this parish. 10 

In Baiamund the archdeaconry of Ross is rated at 8 ; in the Taxatio Sec. xvi. at 24, 16s. ; 
and in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued at 80. u In the rental of the bishoprick given in to 
the collector of thirds between 1561 and 1566 there is entered ' ane pairt of the teindis of the 
parochinis of Kilmowir and Kilernane yeirlie riddin, quhylis les quhylis mair, estimat to 5 ch. 
8 bo. comounly.' 12 About 1569 the reader at Kyllarnane had a stipend of 20. 13 In 1574 the 
minister's stipend was ' the haill archidenerie of Ross, extending to xii ch. victuall and xii li. xiii s. 
iiii d. money, he sustenand his readare at Killernane,' to whom he paid yearly 16. 14 In 1576 the 
minister had only two-thirds of the archdeaconry, and the reader the same stipend as before. 15 

By a charter, dated at Eddyrdor in 1278 on the Friday after the feast of the Exaltation of the 
Holy Cross, Andrew de Boscho and Elisabeth his wife granted to the monks of Beauly two 
marks, to be received yearly at their castle of Eddyrdor from them and their heirs or from their 
bailies for the time, or in their tenement of Eddirdor. 16 In 1294, by an agreement made at 
Lovet in the Ard on Friday 26 March, Hugh of Ross (of Kilravock) and Mary his wife (the 
daughter of Sir Andrew de Boscho and Elizabeth Byseth) granted in heritage for eight years 
from Whitsunday of that year to Sir David of Graham (the brother in law of Elizabeth) a davach 



1 New Stat. Ace. in the fifteenth century. In 1457 the chancellor of 

2 Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. Ros and William Vrquhard in Crumbathy were ap- 

3 Book of Assignations. pointed by King James II. to assist liis chancellor in 
1 Ibid. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. lii. fol. 75. visiting and reforming them. Acta Par). Scot., vol. ii. 

5 Macfarlane. Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. p. 49. 

6 New Stat. Ace. I0 See ROSEMAEKIE, post. " MSS. in Adv. Lib. 

7 Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. Old Stat. Ace. 12 Book of Assumptions. lif Register of Ministers. 

8 Old Stat. Ace. 14 Book of Assignations. 15 Ibid. 

9 Kilravock Charters. There were hospitals in Ross 16 Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. 



526 ORIGINES [KILLEABNAN. 

of land called Culcolly in their tenement of Edirdowyr, of which they had received beforehand 
from Sir David the ferine for the first four years ; the grantee paying yearly for these four years 
two pennies sterling, namely, one penny on the fifteenth day after the feast of Pentecost, and one 
on the fifteenth day after the feast of Saint Martin in winter and for the second four years 
eight marks sterling at the same terms ; reserving to Hugh and his wife and their heirs their 
wood (bosco) of Culcolly with one acre which John called Dalt formerly held. 1 It was agreed 
between the parties that, if the land should be laid waste by war (guerram patrie), it should 
remain in the hands of Sir David and his heirs till they should have received from it as much of 
the fruits as they should have lost by the war that, if Sir David and his heirs or tenants (fir- 
marif) should sustain any loss on the land through the fault of the granters or of their heirs, 
the land should remain with the grantees until they recovered then- loss from it, or until 
the granters should satisfy them at the sight of trustworthy persons that, if the granters should 
sustain any loss through defect of payment of the formes at the appointed terms, the grantees 
should satisfy them at the sight of trustworthy persons both for their loss and for the principal 

debt and that at the end of eight years the davach of Culcolly, saving those conditions, should 

peaceably revert to Hugh of Ross and his wife. 2 For nearly two centuries afterwards the history 
of the lands known as the lordship of Ardmanach, which included the tenement of Edirdowyr, is 
almost a blank, and we have only some obscure intimations in writs of the period that they were 
partly or wholly in the possession of the De Moravias of Duffus and of Bothwell and that the 
Earl of Ross was overlord. 3 In 1455 the barony of Eddirdail called Ardmanache, and the Red- 
castell with the lordships of Ros belonging thereto, were annexed to the crown by King James 
II. 4 In 1481 (5 April) King James III. granted to his second son James Stewart, Marquis of 
Ormound, the lands of the lordship of Ardmanauche called Avauch and Nethirdul, with the 
moothill (mons) of Ormound and the castle and fortalice of Redcastell. 5 In the same year 
and month (12 April) the King confirmed the grant by a charter under his great seal. 6 About 
the same period the lands and ' house' of Arthmannoch were held by George Earl of Huntlie of 
Queen Margaret, who in a letter without date addressed to that nobleman thanks him for his 
great labours ' in the recouering of the house, the keping of the samyne, and the defence and 
plenysing of the landis,' stating her intention to accept as the fermes of the lands for the past 
terms fifty good marts for her larder at Striueling, granting to him the remainder of the dues for 
the keeping of the castle during the same terms, and promising that he should have the pre 
ference as lessee at next lease. 7 In 1482 (24 June) the Earl granted to Huchone the Ros of 
Kilrawok till 8 September following the keeping of the Reidcastell and lands of Ardmanacht, 
which the Earl had ' in gouernans of our Souerane ladie the Queyne,' discharging him (in lieu of 

1 Kilravock Charters. 2 Ibid. 5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. ix. no. 59. MS. penes Edi- 

3 Bcauly Charters apud Macfarlane. Kilravock tor. 

Charters. Regist. MoraViense. The family of Kilra- 6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. ix. no. 60. In the confirma- 

vock (Spalding Club). tion the lands are styled Avauch and Eddirdule, and 

4 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. p. 42. This seems to in- in the other MS. cited they are Alway and Neuer- 
clude Edirdowyr or Killearnan, the rest of Ardma- daill. 

nach, and probably also the lordship of Dingwall. 7 Kilravock Charters. 



KII.LEARNAN.] PAEOCHIALES. 527 

payment) of the dues of the lands of Vrquhard and Glenmorisone which he held of the Earl. 1 
In 1485 (6 February) Robert Colvele the Queen's ' seneschal' granted to the baron of Kilrawec 
a discharge for 34 marts and 16 in silver of the dues of Ardmanach. 2 In 1488 King James III. 
created his second son James Earl of Edradale or Ardmanach. 3 Before the 3d of February 1492 
the lands of Ardmanach and the Eedcastal were taken from Hucheoun the Ros of Kilravok by 
Kenzo (Kenneth) Makkenze of Kintail. 4 By an obligation dated at Lochcanmor on the 15th of 
July of that year George Earl of Huntle bound himself to restore to the baron of Kilrawak his 
lease of the Redcastal and Ardmanacht ' in sa far as resoune and law will,' together with his 
' goods' which he had in the same ; and to do his diligence with the King and the Earl of Both- 
wele for the recovery of the lease to himself and to Hucheoun. 5 On the 16th of August of the 
same year (at Newark on Spey) the Earl became bound to pay to Huchon Ros of Geddas, the 
son and apparent heir of Huchon Ros of Kylrawok, 100 Scots for resigning the lease of ' Ard- 
mannache and castell of the same,' and for the expenses connected therewith ; which lease 
Huchon Ros had from the Earl's son Alexander Lord Gordoune, to whom also he resigned it ; 
the 100 to be paid at the following Martinmas or within forty days thereafter, Patrik Gordon 
dwelling in Dorno being security. 6 On the same day and at the same place Alexander Lord 
Gordoun granted to Hucheoun the Ros of Geddas a discharge for 200 marks Scots of the ' mails' 
of Ardrnanach, due to him ' befor the taking of the Redcastal be Kenzo Makkenze fra the said 
Hucheoun,' and for ' al malis, fermys, and customis, sen the said Makkenze tuk the said castal 
and landis of the Ardmanach fra the said Hucheoun.' 7 In 1498 Alexander Finlawsone appears 
as ' mair and serjand' of the lordship of Ardmannoch under James Duke of Ross the brother of 
King James IV. 8 In the same year that king commissioned certain persons to distrain the lands 
and goods of William Forbes in Strathglas, Welland Chesholme of Comar, Murquho Makcoule, 
Duncan Lauchlansoun, Johne Duff Makalester, Johne Johne Duffsone, Alexander Makdufsone, 
Johne Roy Makanroy, Dougale Makaneduff, Rory Mule Makcoule, Alexander Finlaysoun, Auch- 
aneroy Kenyeoch, Duncan Maklauchlane in the Bray of Ros, Rury Williamsoun in Moy, Donald 
Makanedoy, Kenyeoch M'Conleif, Donald M'Conleif, Johne Dow Makalester, and Rury Gar 
Makteir Makmurquhy, to the amount of certain oxen, cows, horses, sheep, goats, capons, hens, 
geese, victual, swine, sums of money, and other goods, taken by them from Huchone Ros of Kil- 
rawok out of the lands of Ardmanach and the Redecastell ' the tyme that he wes capitane therof 
a commission formerly entrusted to David Ros of Balnagown the king's sheriff of Ros, and 
neglected by him. 9 In 1499, on a warrant granted by George Earl of Huntly the King's lieute 
nant, Duncan Makynthois captain of the Clanchatane, John the Grant of Frucliy, Huchownethe 
Ros of Kylrawok, Alexander Crome of Inyerethnac, Alexander Keir of Ratamorkos, Lachlane 
Makintows of Galawe, and their accomplices, to the number of 3000, passed to Ross ' tyll birne, 
hary, and sla,' against Canoch Makcanehe and his kinsmen and friends dwelling in Ross, the 
King's rebels and at his horn for the slaughter of Harrald of Schescheme dwelling in Straglas, 

1 Kilravock Charters. * Kilravock Charters. Gregory, pp. 55-57. 

2 The Family of Kilravock, p. 151. s Kilravock Charters. c Ibid. 

3 Additional Sutherland Case, chap. iv. p. 57. " Ibid. 6 Ibid. y Ibid. 



528 ORIGINES [KILLEARNAX. 

and for diverse other ' herschippis, sclacteris, and spowlleis' committed by Kanoch Makkanehy 
and his kinsmen and accomplices of the Clankanye on the King's ' pur legis and tenandis' in the 
lordship of Ardmanoch. 1 In a document dated at the Newark on Spey 15 December 1499 the 
Earl of Huntly declares that ' quhat skath that was done at that tyme to the saidis Clynkane and 
thair complissis was be the Kyngis commande and ouris as luftanande.' 2 About the year 1503 
James Duke of Ross and Earl of Edradale resigned his lands, including those of Ardmanach. 3 
In 1506 (6 May) King James IV. commissioned Andro bishop of Caithnes to let for five years to 
the tenants at the time or others the lands of the lordships of Ross and Ardmannoch formerly- 
belonging to Elizabeth Countess of Ross, except the lands of Tarbat.* In the same year 
(2 November) he appointed that bishop for nine years chamberlain and captain of the lands and 
lordships of Ross and Ardmannach, and captain of the castles of Dyngwell in Ross and of Rede- 
castell in Ardmannach. 5 In 1507 (22 March) he appointed the same bishop and another person 
chamberlains of the same lands, and captains of the same castles. 6 On the following day 
(23 March) lie appointed the bishop for nine years to the same offices. 7 On 13 April following 
he commissioned the bishop and others to examine the infeftments of the tenants, and to send 
him copies of the same. 8 On 22 April he granted to the same bishop for three years all the fish 
ings of both lordships. 9 In 1511 he granted to the bishop, then his treasurer, for large sums of 
money and other services, for nine years the same lands and lordships, with the woods, forests, 
waters, lochs, yairs, and fishings, and also the castles. 10 In 1524 King James V. granted the 
earldom of Ros and lordship of Ardmannach to James Earl of Murray. 11 In 1561 Queen Mary 
appointed George Monro of Dawcarty during her pleasure bailie and chamberlain of her lands 
and lordships of Ros and Ardmannauch. 12 In 1568 King James VI. granted the same offices to 
the same George Monro during the will of the King and his Regent. 13 In 1576 the same king 
granted in heritage to Thomas Murray, the brother german of David Murray of Cars, his salmon 
fishing on the water of Conan for three years from 1 December of that year, commanding the 
tenants of Ardmanoch and others to perform the services due by them. 14 In 1577 he appointed 
Robert Monro of Fowlis bailie and chamberlain of the earldom of Ros and lordship of Ardmanoch 
for a year or longer according to the will of the King and Regent. 15 

In 1294, as we have seen, Hugh of Ross and Mary his wife granted for eight years in heritage 
to Sir David of Graham the davach land of Culcolly in their tenement of Edirdowyr. 16 In 1511 
King James IV. granted to Henry Stewart the lands of Culcowy, Drumnamarge, and Muren, 
with the mill of Redcastel, in the lordship of Ardmannach, extending in all to 43 marks, for 



Kilravock Charters. 2 Ibid. '" Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iv. ft'. 158, 159. See DINGWALL. 

Additional Suthcrl nd Case, chap. iv. p. 58. p. 490. 



* Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 
1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 

* Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 
7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 
1 Ibid. See DINOW 
'' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol 



fol. 108. 11 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. vii. fol. 92. 

i. fol. 82. 12 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxi. fol. 4. 

i. fol. 118. is Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxvii. fol. 29. 

i. fol. 106. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. fol. 108. See DINOWALL. 

-L, p. 490. p 491. 

ii. fol. 107. See DINGWALL, ^ Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliv. fol. 26. 



P- 490. is Kilravock Charters. See pp. 525, 526. 



KILLEARNAN.] PAROCHIALES. 529 

the yearly payment of 41, in order to augment the King's rental by the sum of 21 marks 
6 shillings and 8 pence. 1 In 1554 Queen Mary granted the same lands and mill, resigned by 
Kobert Stewart of Muren, to John Stewart his son and apparent heir. a In 1557 a charter 
granted by Walter Innes, the son and heir apparent of Walter Innes of Innerbrakye, is witnessed 
by Thomas Leslie in Culcowy. 3 In 1584 King James VI. confirmed a charter by John Stewart 
of Mureane, alienating in heritage to Eodoric M'Kainzie of Arthirfairthlie the mill of Eeidcastell 
in the lordship of Ardmanoch. 4 In 1616 Kobert Stewart was served heir male of entail and 
provision to his uncle Sir James Stewart of Muren in the lands of Culcowie, Drumnamarge, 
and Muren, in the same lordship, and of the extent of 39, 13s. 4d. feuferme. 5 The lands of 
Culcowie (now Kilcoy) were afterwards held by Mackenzies, one of whom Alexander Mackenzie 
of Culcowie appears in record about the year 1642." In 1662 Colin M'Keanzie of Reidcastell 
was served heir male to his father Roderic in the mill of Reidcastell of the extent of 3 marks. 7 

In 1526 King James V. granted in heritage to Henry Dingnevale certain lands in the lord 
ship of Ardmanach, including the lands of Ardirfalie of the extent of 5, two muttons, and 
24 capons. 8 In 1537 he granted the same lands to Patrick Dingwall the son and heir of the 
deceased Henry. 9 In 1584 and 1599 Rodoric M'Kainzie of Arthirfairthlie or Ardafailie appears 
in record, and in the latter year we have also Murdoch M'Kenzie his son and apparent heir. 10 
In 1639 Rorie M'Kenze appears as heritable proprietor of the lands of Ardafalie. 11 

In the parish are held two yearly fairs, one in March, the other in July, the latter apparently 
the same that is mentioned in the seventeenth century as being held at Saint Andrew's chapel 
at Redcastle. 12 

In the year 1179 King William the Lion, his brother Earl David, and his nobles, went into 
Ros with a great army, and built or fortified two castles, one of which is named Edirdovar, 
Ethirdover, or Ewerdover. 13 In 1278, as we have seen, two marks granted to the monks of 
Beauly by Andrew de Boscho and Elisabeth his wife were to be paid yearly at their castle of 
Eddyrdor or in their tenement of Eddirdor, and the grant is dated at Eddyrdor. 14 The grant 
of Culcolly in 1294 by Hugh of Ross and Mary his wife, although the castle is not mentioned, 
fixes the locality of the tenement of Edirdowyr, and consequently of the castle. 15 In 1455, as 
we have seen, the barony of Eddirdaill called Ardmanache was with the Redcastell annexed to 
the crown. 16 In 1481 the same barony or lordship appears as Ardmannache ; its chief lands or 
tenement as Eddirdule, Nethirdul, or Neuerdaill ; and its castle as the Redcastell. 17 About the 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iv. fol. 140. " Kilravock Charters. 

2 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 242. Reg. Sec. Sig., I2 New Stat. Ace. Macfarlane. See p. 525. 

vol. xxvii. fol. 71. 13 Ford. Scot., lib. viii. cc. 28, 76. Ext. e Var. Cron. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 359. Scocie, p. 82. Chronica de Mailros, p. 90. Hailes' 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 10. 6 Retours. Annals. Macpherson's Geographical Illustrations. The 

6 The Family of Kilravock, pp. 332-334. site of this castle has hitherto been considered doubt- 

7 Retours. fill. The notices here collected identify it beyond 
a Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 35. Reg. Sec. Sig., doubt with the Redcastle in Ardmanach. 

vol. vi. ff. 27, 28 ; vol. vii. fol. 27. 14 Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. See p. 525. 

9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvi. no. 16. Reg. Sec. Sig., 15 Kilravock Charters. See The Family of Kilravock, 
vol. xi. fol. 16. pp. 109, 110. 

10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 10. Kilravock Charters. I6 See p. 526. I7 Ibid. 

VOL. II. 3 X 



530 OEIGINES [KILLEARNAN. 

year 1482 the castle appears under the same name and also as the house of Arthmannoch. 1 
In 1484 the Lords of Council sentenced certain persons to enter themselves in ward in various 
castles, and of these James Thomsoun, John Wallace, and Patrick Nelesoun were ordered to 
enter their persons in the Rcdecastell. 2 In 1488, as we have seen, King James IV. created his 
son James Stewart Earl of Edradale or Ardmanacli ; and about 1503, when the latter resigned 
his lands, he retained the Redcastle of Ardmanoch in order to preserve his style of Earl. 3 
The rest of the history of the Redcastle or castle of Ardmanoch previously to the year 1526 is 
<*iven above.* In that year King James V. granted to his familiar servant Henry Kempt the 
lands of Gargestoun, then extending in his rental to 6, 13s. 4d., 8 bolls of bear, one mart, 
and one mutton, and the lands of Hiltoun of the same extent, in the lordship of Ardmanacli ; 
and also the lands of Newtoun in the same lordship belonging to the ward of the castle of 
Reidcastell, together with the constabulary and keeping of that castle also in that lordship, 
with all its lands and dues, and the power of making constables ; the grantee paying yearly for 
Gargestoun and Hiltoun 17, 24 bolls of bear, 2 marts, and 2 muttons, in augmentation of 
the King's rental by 3, 13s. 4d. 5 In 1531 the same king granted to Robert Innes, the son 
and heir apparent of Robert Innes of Innermarky, and to his tenants, the same lands and castle 
for 19 years, for the same yearly payment, ' defalcand to him and thame for the saidis martis 
and mvttonis in payment of the said sovm siclike as is defalcate to vthiris tennentis of the said 
lordschip in tymis bygane.' In 1533 he granted the same lands with the mill and alehouse 
and the keeping of the Reidcastell for 19 years to Robert Innes of Innermarky for his good 
service on the borders in the army of the Regent Murray. 7 In 1545 Queen Mary granted to 
(apparently) the same Robert Innes of Innermarky the same lands and castle, stated in the grant 
to have been resigned by Henry Kempt of Thomastoun. 8 In 1586 King James VI. granted 
in heritage to William Keith the master of his wardrobe various lands in Ross, including the 
lands and towns of Gargastoun, Kewtoun of Reidcastell with the alehouse, and Hiltoun ; the 
grantee paying yearly for Gargastoun 7, 14s. 8d., with 8 bolls 2 firlots of bear, one mart, one 
mutton, 20s. of bondage silver, 5 reek hens, and 80 loads of fuel, and every 5 years 7, 14s. 8d. 
as grassum for Newtoun 14, 6s. 8d., with 2 chalders 2 bolls of bear, 2 marts, 2 muttons, 40s. 
of bondage silver, one reek hen, and 14, 6s. Sd. as grassum for the alehouse of Newtoun 
26s. 8d., and the same sum as grassum and for Hiltoun 7, 4s. 8d., with 1 chalder 1 boll of 
bear, one mart, one mutton, 20s. of bondage silver, 8 poultry, 80 loads of fuel, and 7, 4s. 8d. 
grassum. 9 In 1599, by a contract dated at the canonry of Ros on the 13th of June, it was 
agreed between Wiliam Ros of Kilravok and Rorie M'Kenzie of Ardafailie, that Murdoch 
M'Kenzie, the son and apparent heir of Rorie, should marry Margaret Ros the daughter of 
William that Rorie should infeft Murdoch and Margaret in the davach land of Killewnan 
and Spittall with the alehouse and its croft, the three quarter lands of the town and lands of 

1 See p. 526. 2 See DINOWALL, p. 497. c Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 9. 

3 Add. Sutherland Case, chap. iv. p. 58. 4 See p. 5'28. ~ Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. ff. 184, 185. 

5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 81. Reg. Sec. Sig., Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xix. fol. 48. 

vol. vi. fol. 47 ; vol. vii. fol. 49. '> Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff'. 46-48. 



KILMUIK WESTER.] PAROCHIALES. 531 

Gargastoun, and the quarter lands of Hiltoun of Tarradoll and that William Eos should pay 
to Eorie and his daughter the sum of 4500 marks Scots. 1 In 1662 Colin M'Keanzie of 
Eeidcastell was served heir-male to his father Eoderic M'Keanzie of Eeidcastell in the lands 
of Gargristoun, of the extent of 7, 13s. 8d. ; the town and lands of Newtoun of Eeidcastell, 
of the extent of 13, 6s. 8d. ; the alehouse of Newtoun of the extent of 26s. 8d. ; and the 
smith's croft of the same extent, in the same town of Newtoun of Eeidcastell. 2 A writer of 
the same century styles the castle ' Castel Eiwy ' and ' the house of Eedcastle.' 3 A writer 
of the last century says that the castle was a place of considerable strength, and that it had 
the rights of a burgh of barony, of a free port, of weekly markets, of levying tolls and anchorage 
dues, and all other baronial privileges not abrogated in 1748.* The Eedcastle, modernised 
and still inhabited, stands on the shore about a quarter of a mile east from the church. 5 

The castle of Kilcoy (Culcolly), now a ruin, stands on the height above the Eedcastle, a 
short distance inland. 6 

The parish formerly abounded with cairns, one of which in the north of the parish bears 
the name of Cairn Irenan, supposed to be the origin of Killearnan, and to be the name of a 
Danish prince slain at the place. 7 



KILMUIE WESTER 

Kilmowir 8 Kilmowr 9 Kilmur 10 Kylmuir Westir 11 Kilmure 12 
Kilmuir Westir 13 Kilmure Westir u Kilmuir 1S Killimure 16 
Kilmorie, Kilmoor. 17 (Map, No. 26.) 

IN 1756 the parishes of Kilmuir and Suddy were united, a part of each was added to 
Killearnan, and a part of Killearnan added to the united parish. 18 

The parish of Kilmuir Wester seems to have stretched along the shore of the Moray Firth 
from Kessock to Munlochy Bay, running inland for about three miles, and becoming gradually 
narrower as it receded from the shore. It has no high hills, and its surface is composed chiefly 
of cultivated tracts and moor. 

1 Kilravock Charters. ' Ardafailie,' written also 9 A. D. 1561-1566. Ibid. 

' Ardifaill,' ' Ardirfalie,' and in various other forms, "> A. D. 1569. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 31. 
seems to be the modern representative of the name n Circa A. D. 1569. Register of Ministers. 



Edirdover' or ' Eddirdale. 
- Retours. 3 Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 

4 Old Stat. Ace. 



5 Macfarlane. Blaeu. Modern Maps. New Stat. ' Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaen. 



Ace. 6 Anderson, p. 501. New Stat. Ace. 

7 Old and New Stat. Ace. 
* A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. 



A. D. 1573. Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 126. 

A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. 

A. D. 1585. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Hi. fol. 75. 



A. D. 1649. Kilravock Charters. 
7 A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlaue's Geog. Collect. 
Old Stat. Ace. 



532 ORIGINES [KILMUIR WESTER. 

This church first appears in record between the years 1561 and 1566, at which time Sir 
David Barchan was vicar of Suddy and Kilmowr. 1 In 1569 King James VI. presented John 
Eeid (successively reader and exhorter) to the vicarage of Kilmur, vacant by the decease of the 
same Sir David. 2 In 1573 he presented John Ros to the vicarage of Kilmure and Suddy, vacant 
by the decease of John Reid. 3 In 1574 Andro Myll was minister at Kilmuir Westir and other 
three churches, and the reader at Kilmuir Westir was John Ros, apparently the person presented 
to the vicarage in 1573. 4 In 1579 Alexander Vrquhart dean of Ross, with the consent of the 
canons during the vacancy of the see, leased for life to Robert Gralmme archdeacon of Ross, for 
life to his nearest heir, and for 19 years to his nearest heir's heir and his heirs, the teind sheaves 
and teind wedders of the two Culmawris, Drynys, and Slego, in the parish of Kilmure Westir, 
beginning at Lammas (1 August) of that year. 5 In 1585 the lease was confirmed by King 
James VI. 6 

The church stood on a small eminence in the south-east of the parish on the shore of the 
Moray Firth. 7 Its cemetery seems to be still in use. 8 The church of the united parish, built 
in 1764, stands at Knockbain on Munlochy bay. 9 

There was a chapel at Haudach or Haldach in this parish, the patronage and tithes of which 
in 1673 belonged to Alexander Brodie of Lethin (in Nairn), and formed part of his lordship, 
barony, or regality of Kinloss. 10 

Between the years 1561 and 1566 the bishop of Ross states a part of the teinds of Kilmowir 
and Kilernane at 5 chalders 8 bolls. 11 At the same period the rental of the vicarages of Suddy 
and Kilmowr is stated as follows by Sir David Barchan the vicar ' The saidis twa vicarages 
in tyme bygane, quhen all dewteis and teindis was dewlie payit, sic as lamb, woll, stirk, buttir, 
cheis, teind aill, corsprescntis, and Pash fynis, and teind lynt and hempt, and teind fishes of the 
steill of Kissok, was worth in [comoun] yeiris xx merkis, and now thir twa yeiris bygane 
nothing gottin.' 12 Previously to 1573 we have on record the following statement ' John Reid, 
reidar, xx li. Beltym 1568, now exhortar sen November 1569, his stipend xl lib., and now 
vicare of Kylmuir, extending to iii li. vi s. ix d., to be allowit in his stipend sen Ixx yeris crope.' 13 
In 1574 the reader at Kilmuir Westir had for his stipend 6, 13s. 4d., the kirklands, and some 
other perquisites.' 1 * 

By a charter dated at Dyngvale 8 August 1394 Eufame Countess of Ros granted to Sir George 
of Lesly lord of Rothes the ward and relief of the lands of Culmor, which formerly belonged to 
John of Monymusk ; granting him also the lands and their dues till the entry of the lawful 
heirs. 15 In 1454 Andrew Urrie of Forglen was served heir to his brother John of Monimosk, 
who died vest and seised in the lands of Culmore. 10 In 1460 the same lands were acquired 

1 Book of Assumptions. Old Stat. Ace. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 31. Register of ' Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. lu Retours. 
Ministers. n Book of Assumptions. 12 Ibid. 

:l Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 126. 13 Register of Ministers. 

4 Book of Assignations. i< Book of Assignations. 

6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Hi. fol. 75. ' Ibid. '* Kilravock Charters. 

: Macfarlane. MS. Maps. Blaeu. Old Stat. Ace. 10 The Family of Kilravock, p. 139. 



KILMUIR WESTER.] PAROCHIALE S. 533 

bv Robert Hunter of Balnkirk. 1 In 1474 the same Robert sued John Earl of Ross for withhold 
ing from him the lands of Culmor and the dues of the same for 13 years, extending yearly to 20 
marks, contrary to various acts of parliament and council, and in contempt of the King's man 
dates. 2 The Earl not appearing when cited, the Lords Auditors ordained that Robert Huntar 
should enjoy the lands of Culmor undisturbed by the Earl, that the latter should pay to Robert the 
dues for the time specified, and that the nearest lands and goods of the Earl should be distrained 
for the same. 3 In 1482 Master James Huntar of Culmore rector of Cranstoun (the son of Robert 
Huntar) sold the lands of Culmore to Hugh le Ross baron of Kilrawak, to whom in 1485 King 
James III. granted a crown charter of the lands. 4 In 1498 Huchoun Ross of Kilrawok (the son 
of the former) complained to King James IV. that James Duke of Ross the King's brother had 
obtained the King's warrant for the restoration of certain ' goods' which Huchoun had law 
fully distrained for the dues of his lands of Culmore for three terms. 5 In consequence of this 
complaint the King (13 July) ordered Alexander Finlawsone ' mair and serjand' of the lord 
ship of Ardmannoch to appear before him and his council at Aberdeen or elsewhere on 8 No 
vember or next lawful day. to answer for withholding from Huchon Ross the sum of 10 marks 
with the ' mare ' of the dues for two terms of the lands of Culmore, and all other dues of the 
lands for those two terms, assigned by the King to Huchoun a year before his entry to the lands 
in the year 1495. G In 1517 Hugh Ross of Kilrawok was served heir to his father Hugh Ross in 
the lands of Culmoyr in the earldom of Ross, of the old extent of 15 marks. 7 In 1527 
King James V. granted to James Dunbar, the son of Master Patrick Dunbar, certain subjects 
in the lordship of Ardmanach, including the lands of Westir Haldach, extending to 4, 10 
bolls of bear, 2 bolls of oats, the half of a mart, the half of a mutton, 2 dozen poultry, and 
8 loads of turfs, the grantee paying 13s. in lieu of the victual the lands of Estir Haldach, 
extending to 40s., 4 bolls of oatmeal, 1 boll of bear, the fourth of a mart, the fourth of a 
mutton, and 4 loads of turf, the grantee paying 5s. 6d. instead of the victual the alehouse 
with its croft, extending to 20s. the smethy-croft extending to 8s. the croft of Pettis- 
law, extending to 12s. and the Mariscroft extending to 13s. 4d. with other lands; of all 
which the chief messuage was to be Casteltoun (in Avoch). 8 In 1530 the same king granted 
to Hugh Ros of Kilrawak and Agnes Urquhard his wife the lands of Coulmore and half the 
lands of Dawaucht in the lordship of Ardmannach, which Hugh Ros had resigned. 9 In 1542 
the same king, understanding that Huchoun Rose of Kilrawok and his servants had recently" 
resisted the arrestment of their corn by the sheriff of Name and his deputies at the instance 
of the bishop of Moray on the lands of Cowlmore in the barony of Kilrawok and sheriffdom 
of Name, and had thereby incurred confiscation of their goods and imprisonment of their 
persons, for the good service done by Huchoun Rose and for other causes remitted to him 
self and servants all crime incurred on that account. 10 In 1572 King James VI. confirmed a 

1 The Family of Kilravock, p. 139. Acta Aud., p. 30. ' Retours. 

J Acta Auditorum, p. 30. 3 Ibid. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 'Jo. 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xi. no. 21. 9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxiv. no. 12. Reg. Set. Sig.. 

'" Kilravock Charters. 6 Ibid. vol. viii. fol. 184. lu Kilravock Charters. 



534 ORIGINES [KILMUIR WESTER. 

grant by Hugh Eos of Kilrawak to Catherine Falconar his wife of the liferent of the lands 
of Myd Culmoir and Westir Culmoir. 1 In 1580 he confirmed a grant in liferent by the same 
Hugh to the same Katharine of the lands of Eister and Mid Culmoir, and the lands of Haldacht 
with the kiln (torrali) of the same called Toldegormok, with the fishing of the ' yair' and 
other pertinents, in the lordship of Ardmanach, earldom of Eos, and sheriffdom of Innernes. 2 
In 1586 the same king granted in heritage to William Keith the master of his wardrobe various 
lands in Ross, including those of Wester Half Daokis, the grantee paying yearly for the latter 
4, 8s. 8d., with 10 bolls, 2 firlots, 2 pecks of bear, 4 bolls of oats, 3 marts, half a mutton, 10s. 
bondage silver, 2 dozen poultry, 3 reek hens, and 40 loads of fuel, and as grassum every five 
years, 4, 8s. 8d. 3 In 1611 Hugh Eoss of Kilrawock was served heir to his father William Ross 
in the lands of Culmoir with the ' steall' and ' yearis,' the fishings of herring and salmon, and the 
' quhytt fishing,' with the parts called Easter Culmoir, Middle Culmoir, Haddoche, Torgarnoche, 
the alehouse and alehouse crofts ; all which were then of the yearly value of 16, and in time of 
peace were worth yearly 4. 4 In 1635, on a complaint by Huchone Eos of Kilrawak against 
the dean of Eoss and others, titulars and tacksmen of the lands of Culmoiris Eister and Westir, 
Haldoche, and Torgormak, belonging to him in heritage, that through their negligence the teinds 
of those lands had not been valued according to act of parliament, a new summons of valuation 
was granted to him by King Charles I. 5 In 1639 the marches were settled between the lands 
of Ardaffalie (in Killearnan) belonging in heritage to Rorie M'Kenze of Reidcastell, and the lands 
of Leadanache (Le Davach ?) and Torgormach (in Kilmuir) belonging in heritage to Houchoun 
Eos of Kilrauock. 6 A controversy which arose in 1640 between Alexander M'Kenzie of Cul- 
cowie and Hucheoun Eos of Kilraok respecting the privilege of casting peats in the ' Month of 
Muilbuy,' which Kilraok claimed in right of his lands of Culmores, and which gave rise to a 
litigation, seems to have ended only in 1678, when the lands of Culmore were sold to Colin 
Mackenzie of Eedcastle. 7 

In the year 1437 Alexander of He, Earl of Eoss and Lord of the Isles, granted to the Friars 
Preachers of Innernys 20s. of yearly rent from his land and ferry of Estir Kessok. 8 In 1586 
King James VI. granted in heritage to William Keith the master of his wardrobe Eister Kessok, 
the ferry of Kessok, and the stell of Kessok with the alehouse ; the grantee paying yearly for 
Eistir Kessok 3, 6s. 8d., 12 capons, 2 muttons, 10 poultry, and 10s. bondage silver, with 
3, 6s. 8d. every five years as grassum for the ferry 6 yearly and 6 every five years as 
grassum for the stell 13s. 4d. and the same as grassum and for the alehouse the same as for 
the stell. 9 In 1662 Colin M'Keanzie of Reidcastell was served heir male to his father Roderic in 
the town and lands of Eister Kessock, of the extent of 3, 6s. 8d. the ferry of Kessock, of the 
extent of 6 the stell of Kessock, of the extent of 13s. 4d. and the alehouse, of the extent of 
13s. 8d. 10 

Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. fol. 91. Kilravock Charters. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvi. fol. 95. ^ Tlie Family of Kilravock, pp. 332-334. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. * Charter in Northern Institution Inverness. 

1 Kilravock Charters. 5 Ibid. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. I0 lletours. 



KILMUIB WESTER.] PAEOCHIALES. 535 

In 1526 King James V. granted to Henry Dingnevale certain lands in the lordship of Ardma- 
nach of the extent of 22 and other dues, including the lands of Petlundy, of the yearly extent 
of 3, 6s. 8d., the half of a mart, the half of a mutton, and 24 poultry. 1 In 1537 he granted 
the same lands to Patrick Dingwall the son and heir of the deceased Henry. 2 In 1542 the same 
king granted to James Fraser the brother of Hugh Lord Fraser of Lovet, the same lands, extend 
ing yearly in fermes and grassum to 4, with 10s. bondage silver, half a mart, and half a 
mutton. 3 In 1583 King James VI. confirmed a charter by Hugh Fraser of Gussoquhan, aliena 
ting in heritage the lands of Petlundie and others to John M'Kainzie of Garloche, by whom they 
were then occupied. 4 In 1619 Issobel M'Kenzie was served heir to her father John M'Kenzie 
apparent of Garloche in the half davach of Pitlundy in the barony of Ardmeonache, of the extent 
of 4, and of 4s. in augmentation. 5 

In 1539 King James V. granted for life to James Fraser the brother german of Hugh Lord 
Fraser of Lovet the 10 marklands of Drumdervat in the lordship of Ardmannach and earldom of 
Boss, for the yearly payment of a penny of silver as blenchferme. 6 In 1563 Queen Mary 
granted to Thomas Monypenny of Kinkell the escheat of the goods of Donald Williamesoun, 
John Noble, and William Alexandersoun, dwelling in Drumderphet belonging to the deanery of 
Ros in the lordship of Ardmannach, denounced rebels and at the horn for non-payment of the 
fermes and dues of the crop 1561 to Master Mungo Monypenny dean of Eos." In 1564 
(16 October) the same queen granted to James Gray, one of her body guards, the lands of Drum- 
darwecht and Westir Kescheok, with the mill, fishings, and other pertinents, then occupied by 
William Lobane and others, and lying respectively in the earldom of Eos and lordship of Ardma- 
noch ; the grantee paying yearly for Drumdarwecht 9, with 20s. for arriage (arigea pecunia), 
36 bolls of victual, one mart, one mutton, 4 dozen poultry, and 4 bolls of horse oats (auenarum 
equinamrn), as the old fermes and dues, and 6s. 8d. in augmentation of the rental and for 
Westir Kescheok and the mill 6, with 4 dozen capons, 4 muttons, and 14 bolls victual, as old 
ferme, and 6s. 8d. in augmentation of the rental. 8 In the same year (2 November) she renewed 
the grant ; the yearly payment being then fixed at 10, 16s., with 2 chalders 6 bolls 1 firlot bear 
with 'the charity,' 4 bolls oats, one mart, one mutton, 4 dozen poultry, 9 reek hens, 20s. of 
bondage silver, and 80 loads of fuel to be laid down in the castle of Dingwell, as the fermes. 
dues, and services, formerly paid for Drumdarveth 7, 4s., with 4 muttons, 4 dozen capons, 8 
reek hens, 20s. of bondage silver, and 80 loads of fuel to be laid down in the same castle, and the 
usual services, as the old fermes due for Westir Kescheok 4 bolls of victual for the mill and 3s. 
4d. for Drumdarveth and Westir Kescheok respectively in augmentation of the rental. In 1578 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 35. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvi. no. 264. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vi. ff. 27, 28; vol. vii. fol. 27. vol. xiii. fol. 8. 

2 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvi. no. 16. Reg. Sec. Sig., 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxi. fol. 97. 

vol. xi. fol. 16. 8 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. no. 406. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 365. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxii. ff. 100-110. 

vol. xvi. fol. 87. 9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. no. 443. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 72. vol. xxxii. ff. 100-110. The ' charity ' was the light 

5 Retours. grain blown out in dressing corn. 



536 ORIGIJS'ES [KILMUIB WESTER. 

King James VI. granted during his pleasure to James Gray in Wester Kessok, for his good 
service ' alsweill in the caus of religioun as in vthiris the common effaris of the realme,' a yearly 
pension of 14 bolls of victual which formerly belonged to the Black Friars of Innernes, to be 
received from the fermes of the mill of Kessok, discharging him also of the dues of the same for 
the years 1576 and 1577. 1 In 1582 he granted to the same James the same pension for life, 
beginning in the year 1580. 2 In 1584 he renewed the grant, the 14 bolls being in his hands by 
the dispersion and demolition of the Black Friars to whom they had belonged. 3 In 1586 he 
granted in heritage to John Wylie writer the mill of Kessok with its croft, houses, buildings, 
astricted multures, and other dues, formerly belonging to the Friars Preachers of Innernes ; the 
grantee paying yearly 14 bolls of meal or for each boll 13s. 4d. between the feasts of the Xativity 
of our Lord (25 December) and of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary (2 February). 4 
In 1587 the same king, on attaining his majority, renewed a grant made by his mother Queen 
Mary to William Keith the master of his wardrobe and the heirs male of his body, with remainder 
to liis heirs male whomsoever, of the lands and towns of Drumdarvat in the lordship of Ardmenoch, 
and the lands and towns of Westir Kessoke in the earldom of Ross ; the grantee paying yearly for 
Drumdarvat 2 chalders 4 bolls bear and meal with ' the charity,' 4 bolls oats, one mart, one 
mutton, 4 dozen poultry, 9 reek hens, 10, 16s. as bondage silver and in augmentation of the 
rental, and 120 loads of fuel and for Westir Kessoke 9, 4s. 4d. as bondage silver and in aug 
mentation of the rental, 4 dozen capons, 10 reek hens, 4 muttons, and 120 loads of fuel as the 
fermes, canes, customs, and dues specified in the rental. 5 In 1624 Kenneth M'Kcinzie was served 
heir to his father Thomas, formerly in Breckanord, in the south half of the town and lands of 
Drumdarfat in the lordship of Ardmeanoche, of the extent of 4, 10s. feuferme. 6 The family 
of Loban, one of whom is mentioned above in 1564, have long been tenants of the farm of 
Larach in Drumderfit, and their supposed or real antiquity has given rise to the proverb, ' as 
old as the Lobans of Drumderfit.' 7 

In 1574 King James VI. confirmed two grants ; 1. A grant by Master William Sinclare rector 
of Olrik, canon of Cathness, commissary and vicegerent of the deceased Henry bishop of Ross, 
with consent of the dean, chapter, and canons of Ross to Oliuer Sinclare of Quhitkirk and 
Beatrice Rollok his wife, and to the male heirs of Oliuer, with remainder to William Sinclare of 
Rosling and the heirs male of his body, and to his heirs male whomsoever of the lands and 
towns of Allanegrange, of which one-fourth was formerly occupied by Margaret Dunbar, two- 
fourths by the widow of Finlay Wilky, and by Henry Wilkie, Andrew Richesoun, Andrew Alex- 
andersoun, and William Reoch the younger, and the remaining fourth by the deceased Master 
Donald Fraser archdeacon of Ross ; the alehouse and mill of Allanegrange ; and the lands of 
Drummoir, extending to a half davach, with the alehouse of Drummoir in the earldom of 
Ross, and to be held of the bishop ; 2. A grant by the same Oliuer with the consent of his wife 
to Colin M'Kanze of Kintale and his nearest male heirs, with remainder to his next male heirs 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig.,vol. xlv. fol. 66. * Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fol. 139. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 18. = Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol. 171. 

J Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 72. Retours. Old Stat. Ace. Anderson, p. 545. 



SODDY.] PAROCHIALES. 537 

bearing the name and arms of M'Kanze, and to his nearest heirs whomsoever, of the same lands, 
mill, and alehouses, to be held as before. 1 

In 1586 King James VI. granted in heritage to William Keith the master of his wardrobe the 
lands of Dryne, for the yearly payment of 4, 15s. 4d., with 2 chalders 4 bolls of bear, 2 bolls 
for ' the charity,' 4 bolls of oats, one mart, one mutton, 9 poultry, and 80 loads of fuel, the 
grantee paying also 4, 15s. 4d. every five years as grassum. 2 

There is a village at Kessock in the west end of the parish opposite the entrance of the 
Caledonian Canal. 3 

In this parish is a large moor with numerous cairns, locally said to have been the scene of a 
battle between the Macdonalds and the inhabitants of Inverness in the thirteenth or fourteenth 
century, and known as Blair-na-coi, a name which implies a termination of the fight by the same 
means as the popular traditional account ends the battle of Luncarty in Perthshire. 4 The 
farmers who at Blair-na-coi rallied the fugitives would appear to have been the ancestors of the 
Lobans, who date their connexion with the place from the era of the alleged battle. 5 

East of Blair-na-coi are the remains of a circle known as James's Temple west of it are 
traces of a camp and on the hill of Kessock to the south are traces of another camp, and a large 
cairn named Cairnglas. 6 



SUDD Y. 

Sudy 7 Suddy 8 Suddye 9 Sudday 10 Suddie 11 Siddy. 12 
(Map, No. 27.) 

IN 1756 a part of Suddy and Kilmuir was united to Killearnan, and a part of Killearnan to 
the united parish of Kilmuir Wester and Suddy. 13 

The parish of Suddy included the northern and hilly part of the united parish, extending 
inland from the head of Munlochy bay to the middle of the elevated moor named the Mulbuy. 

In the year 1227 Thomas the parson of Sudy witnessed at Kenedor in Moray the settlement 
of a dispute between the bishops of Moray and Eoss regarding the churches of Kyntalargyn 



1 Reg. Sec. Sig., voL xlii. fol. 56. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 126. A. D. 1574. Book of As- 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. signations. A. D. 1592. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. iii. 

3 New Stat. Ace. p. 601. 

4 Macfarlane. Old Stat. Ace. 9 A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. 
6 Old Stat. Ace. 'Ibid. 10 Circa A. D. 1569. Register of Ministers. 
'A.D. 1227. Reg. Morav., p. 82. u Circa A. D. 1569. Register of Ministers. A. D. 
8 A.D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 

1569. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 89. A. D. 1570. 12 Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaen. 

Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 29. A. D. 1573. Reg. 13 Old Stat Ace. 

VOL. II. 3 T 



538 OEIGINES [BUDDY. 

and Ardrosser. 1 The church was afterwards a part of the prebend of the chancellor of Koss. 2 
Between the years 1561 and 1566 the parsonage was held by Master Duncan Chalmere chancellor 
and ' vsufructuare,' and by him leased to Master David Chalmer titular and Kichard Wrwing his 
factor. 3 At the same time Sir David Barchane was vicar of Suddy and Kilmowr.* From 1569 
to 1572 Andro Myll, previously exhorter at Awach, seems to have been minister of Awach, 
Suddy, Kilmuir Westir, and Ardorseir. 6 In 1569 King James VI. presented Dauid Thome- 
soun to the vicarage of Suddy, vacant by the decease of Sir Dauid Barrachin. 6 In 1570 
he presented James Buschertt to the same vicarage, then vacant by the decease of Dauid 
Thomesoun. 7 In 1573 he presented John Eos to the vicarage of Kilmure and Suddy, vacant 
by the decease of John Reid. 8 In 1574 and 1576 Master George Monro was minister, and 
Alexander Reid was reader at Suddy. 9 In 1592 King James VI. granted the glebes and 
manses of the chancellary of Ros and the vicarage of Suddy to Master David Chalmer of 
Ormound. 10 

The church, probably dedicated to Saint Duthace of Tain, appears to have always stood at 
Meikle Suddy in the east end of the parish about a mile due north from the bay of Munlochy. 11 
Its cemetery seems to be still in use. 12 The church of the united parish, now known as Knock- 
bain, stands at Knockbain near the head of Munlochy bay. 13 

In the year 1328 there was a controversy between Hugh Earl of Ross and Sir Andrew de 
Moravia about the lands of Dromcudyn, Munlochy, and others, of which neither the origin nor 
the termination is on record. 14 In 1605 Duncan Fraser of Mullochie was served heir to his brother 
german Alexander Fraser of Mullochie in the lands and mill of Mullochie within the chaplainry 
of Mulvoche in the bishoprick of Ross. 15 In 1612 William Fraser of Mullochie was served heir to 
his brother german Duncan Fraser of Mullochie in the lands and town of Mulloche, with the 
mill, mill-lands, multures, and sequels, within the chaplainry of Mullochie and earldom of Ross, 
of the extent of 4. IG 

On a small hill north west from the church, named Hurdyhill, there was in the seventeenth 
century a well, imagined to have the virtue of curing sick children when left one night 
beside it. 17 

In Baiamund's Roll the chancellary of Ross is taxed at 8 ; in the Taxatio Sec. xvi. at 
24, 16s. ; and in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued at 80. 18 In the rental of assumptions 

1 Reg. Morav., p. 82. writs of Tain with Balleguith or Bailedhuich, the 

2 Book of Assumptions. 3 Ibid. undoubted 'town of Duthace,' though interpreted by 
4 Ibid. s Register of Ministers. the writer in the Old Stat. Ace. ' Ball-ma-duich, a good 

6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 89. country town, or Ball-ma-duth, a good black town.' 

7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 29. Register of 12 Old Stat. Ace. 
Ministers. 13 Old and New Stat. Ace. 

8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 126. Rob. Index, p. 28, no. II 2 . "> Retours. 

9 Book of Assignations. 1G Ibid. From these services and another cited under 

10 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. iii. p. 601. ROSEMARKIE it would appear that this chaplainry or 

11 MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. Macfarlane. Old another of the same name was founded in the cathedral 
Stat. Ace. Modern Maps. The sole ground for con- church of Ross. 

jecturing the dedication of the church to Saint Duthace > 7 Macfarlane's Geog. Collect, 
is the local name Belmaduthy, interchanged in old I8 MSS. in Adv. Lib. 



SUDDV.] PAROCHIALES. 539 

it is valued at 173, 6s. 8d., while the united vicarage of Suddy and Kilmowr is given at 
13, 6s. 3d. 1 About 1569 the reader at Sudday had for his stipend 20 yearly, and in 1572 
the minister drew 20 marks yearly from that church and Kylmuir Westir, apparently from the 
vicarages. 2 In 1574 the minister at Suddy and Kynnattas had for his stipend the whole chan- 
cellary, 173, 6s. 8d., out of which he paid his readers ; and the reader at Suddy had yearly 20 
marks and the kirklands. 3 In 1576 the minister had only two-thirds of the chancellary, extend 
ing to 115, lls. Id., and the reader had the same as before. 4 

The chaplainry of Munlochy, as we have seen, was valued at 4 yearly. 5 
In 1389 and 1399 appears in record John Bard or John le Barde. 6 In 1492 Thomas Bard of 
Ordinhuf (in Banffshire) was on an assize of perambulation of the vicarage lands of Abirker- 
dor. 7 In 1526 King James V. granted to his familiar servitor William Bard the lands of 
Balmaduthy, extending in his rental to 6, 13s. 4d., with 1 chalder of bear, 1 mart, 1 mutton, 
and 4 dozen poultry, and the lands of Sudy, extending to 8, with 1 chalder 4 bolls of bear, 
1 mart, 1 mutton, and 4 dozen poultry, in the lordship of Ardmanach, for yearly payment of 
20, with 2 chalders 4 bolls of bear, 2 marts, 2 muttons, and 8 dozen of poultry, in aug 
mentation of the King's rental by 5, 6s. 8d. 8 In the same year he granted to Henry 
Dingnevale the alehouse of Mekle Suddie with its croft and toft, extending to 20s., and the 
mill of Mekle Suddie with its toft and croft, extending to 18 bolls of meal and malt, and 18 
capons. 9 In 1537 the same king granted the same alehouse and mill to Patrick Dingwall the 
son and heir of the deceased Henry. 10 In 1538 he granted the lands of Bowmalduthy and 
Sydde to William Bard for 19 years. 11 In 1542 he appears to have renewed the grant, and fixed 
the yearly payment at 22 Scots, 8 bolls of bear, 8 bolls of oats, 2 marts, 2 muttons, and 8 
dozen of poultry. 12 In 1543 and 1544 James Dunbar in Sudy deceased appears in record. 13 In 
1548 Queen Mary granted to David Dunbar of Bennettisfield all the goods that belonged to the 
deceased James the son of Alexander Dunbar of Sudy. 1 * In 1560 she granted to Master David 
Chalmer provost of Creichtoun in heritage the towns and lands of Castletoun (in Avoch), Achtirflo, 
Balmaduthie, and Mekill Suddie, with the mill, mill-lands, alehouse, and alehouse croft, in the 
canonry of Ross and lordship of Ardmanoch. 15 In 1567 she confirmed the grant. 16 In 1568 
King James VI. granted to Andrew Monro of Newmore, the son and apparent heir of George 
Monro of Dalcarthie, and to Katherine Vrquhart his wife, and to their male heirs, the town and 
lands of Casteltoun with the fishing croft and its pertinents the town and lands of Balmadwthie 
the town and lands of Swdy with the brewhouse (bruerium), croft, and mill the town and 
lands of Ochtercloy and all the pendicles and pertinents of those towns and lands lying in 

1 Book of Assumptions. 2 Register of Ministers. 10 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvi. no. 16. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

3 Book of Assignations. vol. xi. fol. 16. 

1 Ibid. 6 See above. 1! Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xii. fol. 3. 

6 Reg. Morav., pp. 200, 212. * Ibid. pp. 346-348. 2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xvii. fol. 34. 

8 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 131. Acta Parl. Scot., 3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxix. nn. 77, 206. 
vol. ii. p. 311. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiii. fol. 17. 

9 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 35. Reg. Sec. Sig., 5 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. p. 550. 
vol. vi. ff. 27, 28; vol. vii. fol. 27. 6 Ibid. 



540 OKIGINES [BUDDY. 

the earldom of Bos, lordship of Ardmannoch, and sheriffdom of Innernes, belonging in heritage to 
Master David Chalmer formerly chancellor of Eos, held by him of the King, amd forfeited on 
account of treason and lese majesty united in vnam mtegram et liberam particulam et pattern 
terre consolidate vocatam vulgo Casteltoun; the grantee paying yearly the old fermes, victual, 
grassum, and dues, namely, for Casteltoun 11, 10s. 6d. in money, 1 chalder 4 bolls of bear, 4 
bolls of oats, 1 mart, 1 mutton, with the bondages (bondagia) or 20s. in lieu of them, 4 dozen 
poultry, and 1 1 hens commonly called reek hens for the croft commonly called Casteltoun croft 
19s. 8d. and 1 boll of bear for Balmadwthie 10, 16s. in money, 1 chalder 1 boll of bear, 1 
mart, 1 mutton, and 4 dozen poultry, with the usual bondages of the same or in lieu of them 20s. 
for Swdy 13s. 4d., 1 chalder 5 bolls 1 firlot of bear, 1 mart, 1 mutton, 4 dozen poultry, with the 
bondages or 20s. for the brewhouse of Swdy and its croft, 32s. for the mill of Swdy 18 bolls 
of victual half meal half bear, with 1 boll 2 pecks for ' the charity,' and 8 capons for Och- 
tercloy 15, 4s. 9|d. | Scots, 2 chalders bear, 8 bolls oats, 2 marts, 2 muttons, the bondages or 
40s., 8 dozen poultry, and 14 reek hens with 26s. 8d. Scots in augmentation of the rental. 1 
In 1571 King James VI. granted to Master Alexander M'Keinzie a crown charter of the ale 
house of Mekill Suddie with its tofts and crofts, and of the mill of Mekill Suddie with its tofts, 
crofts, and multures, alienated to him in heritage by Patrick Dingwall fear of the same, and to be 
held of the crown. 2 In 1585 the same king confirmed a grant by John bishop of Ross to David 
Dumbar of Vrquhart and Grisillida Leslie his wife, and their heirs, with remainder to David's 
heirs whomsoever, of the lands of Litill Suddy, and the brewhouse with its croft and lands, then 
occupied by David and his tenants. 3 In 1607 William Chalmer apparent of Ormond was served 
heir male to his father Master David Chalmer of Ormond in the town and lands of Castiltoun, of 
the extent of 11, 10s. 6d. the croft of Castiltoun called the chapel croft, extent 26s. 8d. 
the lands of Auchtercloy, extent 15, 4s. 9}d. the lands of Balmaduthie, extent 10, 16s. 
and other dues the lands of Suddy, extent 13, 4s. and other dues the brewhouse croft of 
Suddy, extent 32s. and the mill of Suddy, extent 18 bolls victual with other lands in the 
lordship of Ardmenache and earldom of Boss united into the free portion or part of contiguous 
land called Castiltoun. 4 In 1621 and again in 1625 George Dunbar was served heir to his 
father James Dunbar of Newtoun in the town and lands of Suddie commonly called the lands of 
Meikle Suddie, extent 13, 4s. the alehouse and croft, extent 32s. and the mill of Suddie, 
the multures and sequels, with Carsswairdis, extent 18 bolls of victual. 5 

There is a village at Munlochy at the head of the small bay of the same name. 6 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. ff. 16, 109, 110. 4 Retours. 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 103. Ibid. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. lii. fol. 72. c New Stat. Ace. Anderson. County Maps. 



AVOCH.] PAEOCHIALES. 541 



A V C H. 

Alvach 1 A woch 2 Awoche 3 Awach 4 Awache 5 Awauch 6 
Avache 7 Avach 8 Ava 9 Avoch. 10 (Map, No. 28.) 

THIS parish extends along the shore of the Moray Firth from the bay of Munlochy on the 
south west to the Craigland burn on the north east, and inland to the height of the Mulbuy, 
there rising to 500 feet above the level of the sea. 11 Parallel to the Mulbuy are two lower ridges 
gently sloping towards the north. 12 The bay of Avoch divides the coast into two nearly equal 
parts, the more northern being high and rocky, while a portion of the more southern is flat and 
sandy, and the remainder a mixture of rock and high gravelly beach. 13 

In 1493 (16 October) the abbot of Kynlos (in Moray) sued William lord of Saint John's 
for 400 marks Scots of the dues of the churches of Alvach in Eos and Ellone in Buchane, 
and of the lands of Straithylay, for one year. 14 The abbot declared in court that he should hold 
himself satisfied of 50 marks of the money, if the lord of Saint John's would produce the receipt 
of Master Hew Mertyne to whom he affirmed he had paid them. The Lords of Council there 
fore assigned to him the third day of February following to produce it. And, as the same lord 
asserted that he had by command of the abbot paid to Master Hew the sum of 200 ducats 
amounting to 300 marks Scots, and the abbot denied that he had given any order to that 
effect and also, because the lord of Saint John's affirmed that he had given up to the abbot 
certain lands of the abbey as payment of about 60, and that the abbot had accepted them 
the Lords assigned him the same day to prove his allegations. The church of Awach was 
afterwards a prebend in the cathedral of Eoss. 15 In 1558 Queen Mary presented Sir James 
Ker chaplain to the vicarage of Awoch, vacant or when vacant by the resignation of Sir 
Alexander Pedder. 16 Between 1561 and 1566 Sir Alexander was still vicar of Awoch. 17 In 
1569 Queen Mary presented Andro Mylne to the vicarage, then vacant by Sir Alexander's 
death. 18 From that year till 1576 Andro Myll appears successively as exhorter, minister, and 
vicar. 19 In 1604 John Urquhart was served heir male of entail and provision to his father 
Walter sheriff of Cromartie in the manse or croft of the rector of Awach in the canonry of 

1 A. D. 1493. Acta Dom. Cone., p. 302. 7 A. D. 1621. Retours. 

2 A. D. 1558. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxix. fol. 50. 8 A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 

A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. 9 Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. 

3 A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps. 

4 A. D. 1569. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 88. 1 New Stat. Ace. 12 Old Stat. Ace. 13 Ibid. 
A. D. 1569-1572. Register of Ministers. A. D. 1574. 4 Acta Dom. Cone., p. 302. 15 Retours. 
Book of Assignations. A. D. 1576. Ibid. A. D. 1604. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxix. fol. 50. 

Retours. 7 Book of Assumptions. 

5 A. D. 1569-1572. Register of Ministers. A. D. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 88. 

1621. Retours. 6 A. D. 1576. Book of Assignations. 19 Register of Ministers. Book of Assignations. 



542 ORIGINES [AVOCH. 

Ross, of the extent of 40 shillings. 1 In 1621 George Dunbar was served heir to his father 
James Dunbar of Newtown in three-fourths of the town and kirklands of Awache, extending to 
6 oxgangs of a davach of land, with the mill of the town of Avache, of the extent of 6 the 
alehouse of Avache and its crofts, with the yair and salmon fishing, if any, with wrack and wair, 
groves and woods, of the extent of 25s. and the town and lands of Killen with the tithes 
included, extending to a half davach, in the parish of Awache, of the old extent of 8 shillings. 2 

The church, built in 1670, stands on a height near the shore apparently on the site of former 
churches at the village and on the left bank of the burn of Avoch. 3 

In 1528 King James V. presented Sir John Scherar to the chaplainry of the Virgin Mary 
of Ormondhill in the lordship of Ardcmannach, extending yearly to 5, vacant or when vacant 
by the demission of Sir Seuer Stewart. 4 In 1546 Queen Mary presented Sir Thomas Rag 
chaplain to the chaplainry of the Mount of Ormond, vacant or when vacant by the resignation 
of Sir Seuerin Stewart. 5 In 1567 she granted for life to Master James Chalmer, servant to 
Master David Chalmer chancellor of Ross, the chaplainry of Ormondie, vacant by the decease 
of Sir Thomas Rag. 6 In 1607 William Chalmer apparent of Ormond was served heir male to 
his father Master David Chalmer of Ormond in the croft of Castletoun called the chapel croft, 
of the extent of 26s. 8d. 7 In 1673 Alexander Brodie of Lethin was served heir to his father 
Alexander in the patronage of the chaplainry of Castiltoun with the tithes, as part of the 
lordship, barony, and regality of Kinloss. 8 In 1677 John M'Kenzie of Aplecross, the eldest 
son of the deceased Roderic M'Kenzie of Aplecross, who was the eldest lawful son of Alexander 
M'Kenzie of Coull, was served heir to the latter in the half of the croft called the chapel croft 
of Casteltoun. 9 In 1681 Kenneth Earl of Seaforth, Lord M'Kenzie of Kintaill, was served heir 
male to his great-grandfather Kenneth Lord M'Kenzie and Kintaill, formerly styled Lord 
Kenneth M'Kenzie of Kintaill, in the same chapel croft, of the extent of 28s. 4d. 10 

In 1673 Alexander Brodie of Lethin was served heir to his father Alexander in the patronage 
and tithes of the chaplainry of Killen, as part of the lordship, barony, and regality of Kinloss. 11 

In the parish are three wells, named Hainuck, Charles's Well, and Craiguck, the last of which 
ia still believed to effect miraculous cures, and is frequented for that purpose on the morning 
of the first Sabbath of May. 12 

At the Reformation between the years 1561 and 1566 Sir Alexander Peddir, who had then 
been vicar ' the space of thir four yeiris bygane or thairby,' stated that ' the vicarage of Awach was 
ijuhen guid payment was maid worth be yeir xx merkis, and now not worth x merkis.' 13 Between 
1569 and 1572 we have on record the following two statements 1. Awach, Andro Myll exhorter, 
xl li., now ane minister sen November 1569, i c merkis, and now vicar of Awache, extending to 
viii li. vii s. i d., to be allowit in part of payment of his stipend of Ix yeris crope. 2. Awach, 

1 Retours. 2 Ibid. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxvi. fol. 11. 

3 Macfarlane. MS. Maps. Blaeu. JpOld. Stat. Ace. 7 Retours. See SUDDY, p. 540. 

New Stat. Ace. County Maps. " Retours. 9 Ibid. ' Ibid. " Ibid. 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. x. fol. 18. " New Stat. Ace. 

J Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xx. fol. 36. 13 Book of Assumptions. 



AVOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 543 

Suddie, Kylmuir Westir, Ardorsier ; Andro Mill minister, i c merkis November 1569, xx li. mair 
sen November 1571, and for thir tua kirkis xx merkis sen Lambmes 1572, the vicarage of Awach 
extending to viii li. vii s. i d. in part of payment of the foirsaid stipend. 1 In 1574 the same Andro 
Myll, minister at Awach, Kilmuir Westir, and Arthourseir, had for his stipend 80 with the 
kirklands and other perquisites ; and George Thomsoun reader at Awach had 20. 2 In 1576 
the statement of the assignation of stipend for Awauch is thus given ' Awauch, Andro Miln 
minister, his stipend 66, 13s. 4d. with the kirkland of Awach, thairof the haill vicarage of 
Awauch newlie disponit to him 8, 6s. 8d., and the remanent to be payit out of the thriddis of 
the abbay of Kinlos, &c. ; George Thomsoun reidare at Awauch, his stipend 20, &c.' 3 
The chaplainry of Ormondhill, as we have seen, was in 1528 valued at 5 yearly. 4 
About the year 1328 King Robert Bruce appears to have settled a dispute between Andrew 
Murray and Sir Hugh of Ross about the barony of Auach in Ross. 5 'Andrew Murray' was 
doubtless Sir Andrew de Moravia of Bothwell and Avoch, fifth in succession of that branch of 
the De Moravia family. 6 He was Panetarius, and latterly Warden of Scotland, ' the good 
Warden eminent in an age of heroes and patriots,' and died at Avoch in 1338." John de 
Moravia, the son of Sir Andrew, and also Panetarius Scode, was lord of Botheuyle and Auauch 
from 1338 to 1351. 8 During the same period appears in record John de Mor bailie of the barony 
of Auauch. 9 John de Moravia was succeeded by his brother Thomas, also Panetarius, who died 
in 1361, and whose daughter Joan carried the family estates, including Avoch, to Archibald the 
Grim, third Earl of Douglas. 10 In 1398 among reasons given by the bishop of Moray against a 
judgement of the sheriff of Innernys, declaring that the bishop was bound to give suit in the sheriff 
courts, was the following That the court in which the judgement was given was null, because in 
such a court there ought to be present the sheriff or his lieutenant, three or four suiters (sectatores), 
a clerk of fee, and a judge of fee, while in the court in question there was present but one 
suiter, namely, John the son of Michael (Macmichael) the suiter of Avach, and neither clerk 
nor judge of fee, but that the same John Macmichael who was the only suiter in court acted as 
judge, gave the judgement in question, and thus performed the office both of court and of judge. 11 
The Douglases seem to have held the lands and barony of Avoch till their forfeiture in 1455, and 
before that date, apparently between the years 1440 and 1448, King James II. conferred the 
title of Earl of Ormond on Hugh of Douglas, the hero of Sark, and fourth son of James the 
seventh earl. 12 In 1455 King James II. on attaining his majority recalled all grants which he had 

1 Register of Ministers. 2 Book of Assignations. 8 Reg. Morav., pp. xxxviii., 296, 297. Kilravock 
3 Ibid. 4 See above. Charters. 

5 Rob. Index, p. 28, no. 3. The subject of the dispute 9 Kilravock Charters. 

is printed by Robertson baronia de Lanach, but should 10 Reg. Morav., pp. xxxviii., 300. Reg. Glasg., p. 300 
apparently be read baronia del Auach. Reg. Hon. de Morton, vol. ii. p. 98. 

6 Reg. Morav., pref. pp. xxxvii. xxxviii. Wyntownis " Reg. Moraviense, p. 209. 

Cronykil. w Godscroft's History of the House of Douglas. 

7 Ford. Scot., lib. xiii. c. 37. Buch. Hist., lib. ix. c. Buch. Hist., lib. xi. cc. 29-31. Reg. Morav. p. 228. 
25. Wyntownis Cronykil. Reg. Hon. de Morton, Godscroft says that Hugh ' was made Earle of Ormond, 
vol. ii. p. 68. Reg. Morav., pref. p. xxxviii. Hailes' and had sundry lands given him by the king in Tivi- 
Annals. Chalmers, vol. i. p. 609. dale and Rosse.' 



544 ORIGINES [AVOCH. 

previously made, excepting among others the grants of land in the sheriffdoms of Innernes and 
Bamf made to the bishop of Moray from the lands forfeited by the deceased Hugh of Douglas Earl 
of Ormond and John of Douglas formerly of Balwanye, and held by them of the bishop in chief. 1 
Between the years 1460 and 1481 King James III. created James Stewart his younger son 
Marquis of Ormond. 2 In 1481 (5 April) he granted to the Marquis of Ormound the lands of the 
lordship of Ardmannach called Avauch and Nethirdul, with the moothill of Ormound and the 
fortalice of Kedcastell. 3 In the same year (12 April) he confirmed the grant by a charter under 
his great seal.* About the year 1503 the Marquis, having become an ecclesiastic, resigned his 
lands to his brother King James IV., retaining only the principal messuage or the moothill of 
each property in order to preserve his titles. 5 In 1527 King James V. granted to James Dunbar 
the son of Master Patrick Dunbar certain lands in the lordship of Ardmanach, including the 
lands of Casteltoun, extending to 8, 20 bolls of bear, 4 bolls of oats, 1 mart, 1 mutton, 4 dozen 
poultry, 16 loads of turf the grantee paying yearly 22s. in lieu of the victual and the crofts 
of Casteltoun, extending to 13s. 4d. and 1 boll of bear the lands of Casteltoun to be the prin 
cipal messuage or ' cheif chymmise' of the whole. 6 In 1560 Queen Mary granted to Master 
David Chalmer provost of Creichtoun the towns and lands of Casteltoun and others in the earl 
dom of Ross and lordship of Ardmanoch ; and in 1567 she confirmed the grant. 7 In 1568 King 
James VI. granted to Andrew Monro of Newmore the son and apparent heir of George Monro 
of Dalcarthie, and to Katherine Vrquhart his wife, and to their male heirs, the town and lands 
of Casteltoun, with the fishing croft commonly called Casteltoun Croft, and other lands in the 
earldom of Ros and lordship of Ardmannoch, which belonged in heritage to Master David 
Chalmer formerly chancellor of Ros, and were forfeited by him for treason and lose majesty. 8 
In 1607 William Chalmer apparent of Ormond was served heir male to his father Master David 
Chalmer of Ormond in the town and lands of Castiltoun, of the extent of 11, 10s. 6d., and 
the croft of Castiltoun called the chapel croft, of the extent of 26s. 8d., united with other lands 
into the free portion or part of contiguous land called Castiltoun. 9 

In 1563 Master William Sinclair rector of Olrik, as commissioner of Henry bishop of Ross 
for leasing the lands of the bishoprick, granted to George Dunbar and his heirs male, with 
remainder to his natural son George Dunbar and his heirs male, to Patrick Dunbar the brother 
of George the younger and his heirs male, and to the heirs male whomsoever of George the 
elder, three-fourths of the town and lands of Avach with the mill and multures (except the 
mill-lands occupied by Master Alexander M'Kainze), with the yair and salmon fishing, if any, 
and also the wrack, wair, and woods within the bounds of the town and mill, and the alehouse 
of Avach with its lands, occupied by George Dunbar. 10 Between the years 1564 and 1571 
John bishop of Ross granted to Master Alexander M'Kenze in liferent, and to his eldest son 

1 Reg. Morav., pp. 226-230. 6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 95. 

2 Crawfurd's Officers of State, p. 58. Additional 7 ActaParl. Scot, vol. ii. p. 550. See SUDDIE, p. 639. 
Sutherland Case, chap. iv. p. 67. e Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. ff. 16, 109, 110. See 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. ix. no. 59. MS. penes Kditor. SCDDIE, pp. 539, 540. 

* Ibid. 9 Retours. See SUDDIE, p. 540. 

> Additional Sutherland Case, chap. iv. p. 58. "> Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 142. 



AVOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 545 

Kenneth M'Kenze and his male heirs, with remainder to his second son John M'Kenze and 
his male heirs, and to Alexander's male heirs whomsoever bearing the name and arms of M'Kenze, 
the mill-lands of Awoch, then occupied by Alexander and his subtenants. 1 In 1572 King 
James VI. confirmed the grant of bishop John, and in 1581 he confirmed the grant of bishop 
Henry. 2 In 1580 appears in record Colin Dunbar the son of George Dunbar of Awach. 3 

Between the years 1338 and 1351 Muriel de Eoys the widow of Sir William do Hoys lord of 
Kylrauoke, daughter and one of the heirs of the deceased Andrew of Doun, with the consent of 
her overlord John de Moravia lord of Botheuyle and of Auauch, granted to her second son 
Andrew de Eoys and his heirs her whole share of the lands of Kyllayn and Pethfouyr in the 
barony of Auauch belonging to her in heritage, to be held as freely as by her deceased father, the 
grantee doing to the overlord the service due for his portion of the land.* In 1525 (4 July) 
King James V. granted in heritage to John Dunbar the kinsman of Gawin bishop of Abirden the 
lands of Bannethfeild and Killane in the earldom of Boss and Ardmanach, extending in his rental 
to 7 yearly, for the yearly payment of 9 to augment the rental by 40s. ; the grantee being 
bound to construct on the lands houses of stone and lime, orchards, gardens, pigeonhouses, fish- 
pools, and rabbit warrens, if the ground were suitable. 5 In the same year (17 July) the King 
and parliament confirmed the grant. 6 In 1526 the same king granted to Henry Dingnevale the 
lands of Petfuyr, extending yearly to 44s. ferme the mill of Petfuyr called the Denemylne with 
its toft and croft, extending to 6 and the mill of Pettenochy with its toft and croft, extending 
to 2 chalders of meal and malt, and 18 capons with other lands in the lordship of Ardmanach 
extending in all to 17, 6s. 8d., 3 chalders 2 bolls of oatmeal and malt, 2 quarters of a 
mart, 2 muttons and two quarters, 5 dozen capons, and 24 poultry for the yearly pay 
ment of 22 and other dues, in augmentation of the King's rental by 6, 9s. 4d. 7 In 1527 
the same king granted to James Dunbar the son of Master Patrick Dunbar a number of lands 
in Ardmanach, of which the lands of Casteltoun were to be the chief messuage, and which 
included the lands of Petconnoquhy, extending to 6, 13s. 4d., 20 bolls of bear, 4 bolls 
of oats, 1 mart, 1 mutton, 4 dozen poultry, 16 loads of turf the grantee paying yearly 22s. 
in lieu of the victual three alehouses called the alehouses of Petconoquhy, extending to 
3s. and the mill of Petconoquhy, extending to 2 chalders bear and 3 dozen capons, which 
belonged to the King in property, was luld of him in chief by Henry Dingvale, and was resigned 
by Henry in favour of James Dunbar the grantee. 8 In 1537 King James V. granted to Patrick 
Dingwall the son and heir of the deceased Henry Dingwall, the same lands that were granted to 
his father in 1526. 9 In 1548 Queen Mary granted to David Dunbar of Bennetisfeild the goods 
which belonged to the deceased James Dunbar the son of the deceased Alexander Dunbar of 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. si fol. 59. 7 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 35. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

"- Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. fol. 59; vol. xlvii. fol. 52. vol. vi. ff. 27, 28; vol. vii. fol. 27. See KILLEARNAN, 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 31. p. 529; KILMUIR WESTER, p. 535; and SUDDY,P. 539. 

4 Kilravock Charters. 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 95. See above, p. 544 ; 

5 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. p. 396. Reg. Mag. Sig., and KILMUIR WESTER, p. 533. 

lib. xx. no. 159. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvi. no. 16. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

Ibid. vol. xi. fol. 16. 

VOL. II. 3 Z 



546 ORIGINES [AVOCH. 

Sudy. 1 In 1541 John Dunbar of Bannagcfield appears in record. 2 In 1549 Queen Mary 
granted to David Dunbar, the son and heir of the deceased John Dunbar in Bennettisfeild, 
and to his male heirs, with remainder successively to his brother John and his male heirs, to 
Patrick Dunbar of Sanchar and his male heirs, to Patrick's brother John and his male heirs, to 
the male heirs whomsoever of David Dunbar bearing the same surname and arms, and to his 
nearest female heirs without division, the lands of Bennettisfeild, Petfur, the alehouse of Petfur, 
the lands of Killane, the mill of Petconochy, and the mill of Petfur called the Denemyln, in the 
lordship of Ardmannach, extending in the Queen's rental to 21, 15s. 7d. Scots, 1 chalder meal, 
1 chalder bear with ' the charity,' 1 dozen capons, and 5 reek hens, and then of new united into 
the free tenandry of Bennettisfeild, for the yearly payment of 22, 8s. lid., 12 capons or 6 pence 
for each, 5 reek hens or 4 pence for each, 1 chalder meal, and 1 chalder bear, as feuferme, in 
augmentation of the rental by 13s. 4d. 3 In 15G3 John Jeriour was served heir to his father 
John Jenour in the lands of the fourth part of Killane and the sixth part of Pitfure in the lord 
ship of Ardmanach, of the old extent of 6 shillings. 4 In 1580 King James VI. granted in heri 
tage to William Keith the master of his wardrobe the mill of Petconochy or of Petfour with 
the multures and alehouse, the lands of Kyllane, the lands of Benethef'eild and the mill of 
Petfur with the multures, and the lands of Dryne with the alehouse of Petfur ; the grantee 
paying yearly for the mill of Petconoquhy with the multures 2 chalders victual with 2 bolls 
as ' charity,' 2 dozen capons, and 1 poultry for Petfuir with the alehouse 44s., with 10s. of 
bondage silver, 1 reek hen, and as grassum every 5 years 44s. for Killane 55s., with 4s. 
bondage, 1 poultry, and 55s. as grassum for Beimethfeild 0, 5s., with 8s. bondage, 1 poultry, 
and 0, 5s. as grassum for the mill of Petfur with the multures C, 1 poultry, and 
grassum for Drynic 4, 15s. 4d., 2 chalders 4 bolls bear with 2 bolls as 'charity', 4 bolls of 
oats, 1 mart, 1 mutton, 9 poultry (capons ?) 20s. bondage, 48 poultry, 80 loads of fuel, and 
grassum 4, 15s. 4d. and for the alehouse of Petfur 10s. and the same sum as grassum. 5 In 
1620 Alexander Genor was served heir to his father John Genor portioner of Pitfuir in the sixth 
part of the town and lands of Pitfuir, of the old extent of 3 shillings. c In 1021 George Dunbar 
was served heir to his father James Dunbar of Newtoun in a piece of moor called Blairfoyde or 

Newtown of adjacent to the lands of Killen in the lordship of Ardmeanoche in the 

sherifl'dom of Innernes, with common pasture on the hills called Mulboy and Ordhill, of the old 
extent of 3 shillings. 7 In 1037 Alexander Dunbar of Bennegfeild was served heir male to his 
father John Dunbar of Bennegfeild in an oxgang of Killen in the lordship of Ardmeanach and 
sheriffdom of Innerness, and in a piece of moor called Blairfoyde adjacent and united to the same, 
of the old extent of 5 shillings. 8 In 1070 King Charles II. granted to Sir George M'Kenzie of 
Rosehaugh, Lord Advocate, an oxgang of land called Easter Killeane, and a particate of land or 
piece of moor called Blairfoid, then arable, lying beside the former and bounded as follows 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiii. fol. 17. 4 Uetours. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiv. ft 1 . 80, 81. j Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fl'. 40-48. 
' Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 369. Reg. Sec. Sig., ' Ketours. 

vol. xxii. fol. 81. Ibid. * Ibid. 



AVOCH.] PAEOCHIALES. 547 

' Having the well called the Goosswell of Killeane as the samen flowes in the Goossburne ascend 
ing directly in the litle river or water called Strathburne on the west ; the kirklands of Wester 
Radderie as the samen was possesst of old in the year of God 1598 be the then tennents and 
possessors thereof on the east ; the Strathburne on the north ; and the litle river or water called 
the Goosseburn on the south pairts' with the liberty of common pasture on the hills and within 
the moors called the Millbowie and Ordhill lying south and north of the land of Blairfoid all 
in the parish of Avach, lordship of Ardmannoch, and sheriffdom formerly of Innerness, then of 
Boss. 1 In 1681 King Charles confirmed the grant. 2 

In 1586 King James VI. confirmed a charter by the deceased Alexander bishop of Ross, 
granting to Thomas Wilsoun the son and heir of the deceased John Wilsoun in the canonry of 
Ross and to his male heirs, with remainder to his heirs whomsoever, the lands of Arkynd- 
wycht, Tempilland, and Boigschangie in the diocese of Ross. 3 In 1611 Edward Lord Bruce of 
Kinloss was served heir male to his father Lord Edward in the lordship of Kinloss, including 
among lands formerly belonging to the abbey of Kinloss the lands of Mureailhous, Auchindeuch, 
and a manse within the canonry of Ross, in the parish of Avach. 4 In 1617 Thomas Lord 
Bruce of Kinloss was served heir to his brother Lord Edward in the same lands. 5 

In the last century there were in the parish three villages named Seatown, Kirktown, and 
Milntown, having respectively 378, 99, and 80 inhabitants. 6 At present there seems to be but 
one village, named Avoch. 7 

From the castle of Avoch, known also as the castle of Ormond, Ormondy, or Ormondhill, and 
Douglas Castle, Hugh of Douglas between 1440 and 1448 drew the style Earl of Ormond, and 
James Stewart the second son of King James III. between 1460 and 1481 drew the style 
Marquis of Ormond. 8 In 1481, as we have seen, King James III. granted the lands of Avauch 
with the moothill of Ormound to the Marquis of Ormound, who about 1503 resigned the lands, 
but retained the moothill in order to preserve his title. 9 A writer of the seventeenth century 
mentions Ormondhill south-west from the church with the remains of a castle, and elsewhere 
describes it as ' Casteltoun with the ruynes of a castell called the castell of Ormond, which hath 
gevin styles to sundrie earls and last to the Princes of Scotland.' * The foundations of the castle 
remain on the top of a hill near Castletown point on the bay of Munlochy about 200 feet 
above the level of the sea. 11 They occupy a space 350 feet by 160, and the castle seems to have 
been built of coarse red stone and lime, with a ditch on one side. 12 The hill of Castletown is 
now known as Ormondhill or Ladyhill (the latter name having arisen evidently from the 
dedication of its chapel). 13 

Of the tower of Arkendeith, situated on a farm of the same name, only the lower story 
remains. 14 

1 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. viii. p. 377. 2 Ibid. 9 See above, p. 544. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. fol. 178. * Retours. 10 Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 

5 Ibid. Old Stat. Ace. 7 New Stat. Ace. " Old and New Stat. Ace. 

5 See above, pp. 543, 544. The Old Stat. Ace. says I2 Old Stat. Ace. 

that in the last century tradition gave the castle the 13 New Stat. Ace. See above, p. 542. 

name of Douglas Castle. l * New Stat. Ace. 



548 ORIGINES ['- OGIE WESTEH. 

In different parts of the parish are traces of encampments, and in the churchyard are several 
gravestones with figures in relief of spears, arrows, and stars. 1 

On the farm of Arkendeith there is an old quarry, out of which the cathedral church of Boss 
is said to have been built. 2 



LOGIE WESTEB. 

Logy 3 Logic 4 Logy Westir 5 Logywreid. 6 (Map, No. 29.) 

ABOUT the year 16G9 the parishes of Logic Wester and Urquhart were united. 7 

Logic Wester, forming the southern portion of the united parish, rises gradually from the 
banks of the Conan and the Firth of Cromarty to the ridge of the Mulbuy, the lower part being 
generally cultivated, and the upper waste. 8 

In 1498 King James IV. presented Master John Monroo to the vicarage of Logy-Vrquhard 
(meaning apparently the vicarages of Logy and Vrquhard), when it should be vacant by the 
resignation of Sir Dugall Euresoun.' J In 1.560 Queen Mary presented Robert Monro to the 
vicarages of the parish churches of Vrquhart and Logie, vacant or when vacant by the resignation or 
the inhability of John Monro, or in any other way. 10 At the Reformation the church of Logy was 
part of the prebend of the treasurer of Ross. 11 In 1569 Robert Monro was reader at Urquhart 
and Logy Wester, afterwards exhorter at the same churches, and then minister of them and others. 12 
In 1659 Simoun Fraisser of Innerallochie was served heir to his grandfather Sir Simone of 
Innerallochie in the advowson of the parish church of Logie both parsonage and vicarage. 13 

The church stood on the right bank of the Conan at a place anciently known as Logyreyth 
or Logywreid, where its ruins remained in the end of last century. 14 The church of the united 
parish, rebuilt in 1795, but apparently not on its former site, stands at Urquhart on the 
Cromarty Firth. 15 

In Baiamund's Roll the treasury of Ross is taxed at 8 ; in the Taxatio Seculi xvi. at 
24, 16s. ; and in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued at 80. 16 At the Reformation the 
treasury, including the churches of Logy and Urquhart, and the fourth of the churches of 
Cromarty and Rosemarkie, was stated at 300 marks, of which 100 marks were appropriated 
' for the vphold of the kirkis and to the niinistaris.' 17 In 1569 Robert Monro as reader at 

1 Old Stat. Ace. "- Ibid. 7 Acta Parl. Scot, vol. vii. p. 598. 

3 A. D. 1498. Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. i. fol. 57. A. D. " Old and New Stat. Ace. 
15G1-1566. Book of Assumptions. Circa A. D. 1640. 9 Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. i. fol. 57. 
Blaeu. 10 Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxx. fol. 26. 

4 A. D. 1560. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxx. fol. 26. A.D. " Book of Assumptions. 

1659. Retours. A.D. 1609. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. vii. 12 Register of Ministers. Book of Assignations, 

p. 598. n Retonrs. 

5 A. D. 1569-1572. Register of Ministers. A.D. u Macfarlane. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. Re- 
1574-1576. Book of Assignations. tours. Old Stat. Ace. 15 Old and New Stat. Ace. 

6 A.D. 1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 16 MSS. in Adv. Lib. " Book of Assumptions. 



LOGIE WESTER.] PAEOCHIALES. 549 

Urquhart and Logy Wester had a stipend of 20, and afterwards as exhorter a stipend of 40^ 
In 1574 as minister of the same and other churches he had 66, 13s. 4d. and the kirklands, and 
the reader at Urquhart and Logy had 20.- In 1576 the same minister had for his stipend 
72, 4s. 5d., the kirklands of Urquhart, and other perquisites ; and David Monro reader at 
Urquhart and Logy had 20, paid out of the third of the treasury of Boss by the tacksmen and 
parishioners of Logie Wester. 3 

Between 1336 and 1357 appears in record John of Kynkellee dean of Ross. 4 In 1527 King 
James V. granted to William Dingvale of Kildun the lands of Kinkell-Clairsair, with the Ferry- 
house croft and the privilege belonging to the same, then extending in the King's rental to 
7 marks 6 shillings and 8 pence, and other lands in Ross, extending in all to 23, 13s. 4d., 
4 bolls victual, and 1 mart, for the yearly payment of 33, 6s. 8d., and the other dues, to 
augment the rental by 9, 13s. 4d. 5 In 1542 the same king granted to James Fraser, the brother 
of Hugh Lord Fraser of Lovet, the lands of Kynkell-Clarschac, extending in the King's rental 
to 7, 8s. in ferme and grassum, 8s. of bondage silver, and 3 reek hens with other lands in 
Ross and Ardmannach the grantee paying for the whole yearly 51, 3s., 21 reek hens, 
2^ marts, 2-| muttons, and 8 dozen poultry. 6 In 1553 and 1563 appears in record Thomas 
Monypenny of Kinkell. 7 In 1583 King James VI. confirmed a charter by Hugh Fraser of 
Gussoquhan, alienating to John M'Kainzie of Garloche and his heirs the lands and towns of 
Kinkell-Clarsache in the lordship of Ross, then occupied by John M'Kainzie. 8 In 1584 the 
same king confirmed two grants by the deceased John bishop of Ross 1. A grant to Murdoc 
M'Kainzie and his heirs of the brewhouse of Kinkell and the lands belonging to it, then occupied 
by Murdoc and his tenants ; and 2. A grant to Alexander Cheisholme of Cwmer for life, and to 
his youngest son Wiland (Vallano) Cheisholme and his male heirs, with remainder in succession 
to his second son Alexander and his male heirs, and to his eldest son Thomas and his heirs 
whomsoever, of the lands and town of Kinkell, extending to a half davach, then occupied by 
Alexander Cheisholme the elder. 9 In 1590 Alexander M'Kenze was served heir to his father 
Murdoc M'Kenze of Ferbrone in the alehouse of Kinkell with the brewlands, of the extent of 
49s. feuferme. 10 In 1638 Kenneth M'Keinzie of Garloch was served heir male to his father 
Alexander M'Keinzie of Garloche in the lauds and barony of Garloche, including Kinkell- 
Clairsach, of the extent of 7, 8s. feuferme and other dues, and in the manor place of Kinkell, 
of the extent of 3s. 4d. feuferme. 11 In 1647 Hector M'Kenzie was served heir male to his 
brother John M'Kenzie of Fairburne in the same alehouse and lands, of the extent of 49s. Id. 1 " 
In 1673 Alexander Mackenzie of Garloch was served heir male to his father Kenneth Mackenzie 
of Garloche in the lands of Kinkell-Clairsach and in the manor-place of Kinkell, as in 1638. 13 
The barony of Kinkell-Fraser, stated in 1669 to have been of old called Ferintosh, is still known 

1 Register of Ministers. 6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 365. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

2 Book of Assignations. vol. xvi. fol. 87. 

3 Ibid. ' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxv. fol. 94; vol. xxxi. fol. 92. 
Kilravock Charters. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 72. 

5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxi. no. 36. Reg. Sec. Sig., 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. ff. 35, 40. 10 Retonrs. 

vol. vi. fol. 53 ; vol. vii. fol. 57. " Ibid. a Ibid. " Ibid. 



550 



ORIGINES 



[LOGIE WESTER. 



by the latter name. 1 In 1690 it was held by Duncan Forbes of Culloden, to whom in com 
pensation for losses sustained during his absence in Holland on government service the Scotch 
parliament granted an exemption from the excise duties on spirits distilled from corn grown upon 
the lands.'- In 1786 the privilege was abolished, and a sum of money granted to the proprietor 
as compensation for 30,000 of debt incurred in the service of government by his father the 
well known president of the Court of Session in 1745. 3 

In 1542 Kin" James V. granted to James Frasor, the brother of Hugh Lord Fraser of Lovet, 
the lands of Culboky, extending to 18, 8s. in forme and grassum, 41s. of bondage silver, 
2 marts, 2 muttons, 8 reek hens, and 8 dozen poultry and the alehouse of Culboky, extending 
in forme, grassum, and other dues, to 12 shillings. 4 In 1563 Queen Mary granted to Hugh 
Fraser of Gussachane and Margaret Munro his wife the western half of Eistir Culboky and the 
eastern half of Westir Culboky, with the houses and gardens made and to be made near the 
shore in the place called the Quorrcll, in the lordship of Ardmanach, resigned by Hugh. 5 In 
1581 King James VI. granted to Hugh Fraser of Gussauchan and the heirs male of his body, 
with remainder to his heirs male whomsoever, the mill of Culboky, with the croft, multures, 
and profits, in the earldom of Ross and sheriffdom of Innernes, extending yearly in the King's 
rental to 16 bolls of victual for the yearly payment of 16 bolls 'good and sufficient 
merchandise' with 'the charity,' as the ferme contained in the rental, and one boll of bear in 
augmentation, in all 17 bolls, to be paid between Christmas and Candlemas. 6 In 1586 the 
same king granted the mill of Culboky in heritage to William Keith the master of his 
wardrobe for the yearly payment of 15 bolls of victual with 3 firlots 3 peeks as 'charity.' 7 

In 1503 Alexander Bane of Tullich exchanged with Robert Monro of Foulis the half of the 
lands and fishings of Ferrintosky in Braquhat (in Sutherland) for the lands of Wester Logy 
with the mill and alehouse in the earldom of Ross, and for certain arable lands in the burgh 
of Dingwall. 8 In the same year Queen Mary granted to the respective parties crown charters 
of the lands exchanged. 9 In 1586 King James VI. granted in heritage to William Keith the 
master of his wardrobe the ferry of Scuttoll and the lands and alehouse of Logyreyth ; the 
grantee paying yearly for the ferry 20s., and every 5 years the same sum as grassum for 
Logyreyth 3, with 8s. of bondage silver, 4 poultry, 3 grassum, and the usual services and 
for the alehouse 40s. and the same sum as grassum. 10 In 1681 Kenneth Earl of Seaforth, Lord 
M'Kenzie and Kintaill, was served heir male to his great-grandfather Kenneth Lord M'Kenzie 
and Kintaill, formerly styled Lord Kenneth M'Kcnzie of Kintaill, in the ferry (freto lie ferrie) 
of Scuttell with the land of the same, the lands of Logiereth, and the alehouse of Logiereth, 
respectively of the same extent as in 1586." 



1 Acta Purl. Scot., vol. vii. p. 59S. 

- Old Stat. Ace. 

' Old Stat. Ace., in which see a full account of the 
Knrintosh privilege. 

* Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxviii. no. 36,">. Reg. Sec. Sig., 
vol. xvi. fol. 87. See above. 

> Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. no. 460. Reg. Sec. Sig., 



vol. xxxi. fol. 99. Wester Culboky appears to lie in 
Logic, and Easter Culboky in Urquhart. 

6 Reg. Sec. Sig.. vol. xlviii. fol. 30. 

Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. 

8 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxii. un. 593, 594. Reg. Sec. 
Sig., vol. xxxi. fol. 99. 9 Ibid. 

10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fl'. 46-48. " Retours. 



URQUHABT.] PAROCHIALE S. 551 

The ferry of Scuttoll or Scuddalc, which existed till the end of last century, has been super 
seded by a bridge over the Conan, at which there is now a village named Conan Bridge. 1 

The old castle of Kinkell (apparently the manor house mentioned above) is still standing, 
though somewhat modernised. 2 

In the south-west of the parish are several conical cairns, one of which, opened about 1795, 
contained three stone coffins ranged in a line from east to west. 3 



URQUHAET. 

Vrquhard 4 Vrquhart 3 Urquhart 6 Wrquhart 7 Wrchart 8 - 
Urquhairt 9 Wrwhart. 10 (Map, No. 30.) 

THIS parish, united to Logic Wester about the year 1669, and lying immediately to the north 
of it, has the same general features, rising from the shores of the Firth of Cromarty to the 
ridge of the Mulbuy. 11 

In 722 Saint Malrube of Applecross is said to have beeu murdered by Norwegians at 
Vrquhard in Ross. 1 - There was erected, says the Aberdeen Breviary, on the spot where he 
was slain a chapel of oak which afterwards became the parish church of Vrquhard. 13 The 
church was afterwards a part of the prebend of the treasurer of Ross. 1 * In 1498 King James 
IV. presented Master John Monroo to the vicarage of Logy Vrquhard (Logy and Vrquhard). 
when vacant by the resignation of Sir Dugall Ruresoun. 15 In 1560 he presented Robert 
Monro to the vicarages of the parish churches of Vrquhart and Logie, vacant or when vacant 
by the demission or inhability of John Monro, or in any other way. 16 From 1569 till about 
1572 Master John Robesone seems to have been treasurer of Ross and minister at Urquhart 
and Logy Wester. 17 During the same period Robert Monro was successively reader and ex- 
horter at the same churches. 18 In 1574 Robert Monro was minister, and the office of reader 
was vacant ; in 1576 the same Robert was minister, and the reader was David Monro. 19 In 
1659 Simoun Fraisser of Innerallochie was served heir to his grandfather Sir Simoun in the 
advowson, parsonage, and vicarage of Urquhairt and Logie. 20 

1 Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. e Circa A.D. 1640. Blaeu. 

* ' My Schools and Schoolmasters,' pp. 51, 1ST. 9 A.D. 1659. Retours. 

3 Old Stat. Ace. 10 A. D. 1669. Aeta Parl. Scot., vol. vii. p. 598. 

* A. D. 1498. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. i. fol. 57. A. D. " See LOGIE WESTEE, p. 548. 

1510. Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, estiv., fol. 90. 12 Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, estiv., fol. 90. 

A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. See APPLECROSS, p. 402. 

3 A. D. 1560. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxx. fol. 26. A.D. u Brev. Aberd. ut supra. 
1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. Book of Assumptions. Register of Ministers. 

* A. D. 1569-1572. Register of Ministers. A. D. 15 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. i. fol. 57. 
1576. Book of Assignations. Circa A. D. 1640. MS. 16 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxx. fol. 26. 

Maps in Adv. Lib. A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlane. " Register of Ministers. "> Ibid. 

7 A.D. 1569-1572. Register of Ministers. Circa, 19 Book of Assignations. 
A.D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Retours. 



552 ORIGINES [CULLICUDDEN-. 

The churcli stood at Urquhart near the shore of the Firth, where a new one for the united 
parish was built in 1795 on a different site. 1 

The valuations of the treasury of Ross and of the churches of Urquhart and Logic have 
been given above. 2 The only additional statements with which we are furnished on the 
subject are, that between 1569 and 1572 Master John Eobesone, treasurer and minister, had 
as his stipend the third of his own benefice amounting to 66, 13s. 4d., and that after 
November 1571 the reader had 19 marks additional, apparently for the church of Urquhart. 3 

The lands of Culboky, described above, lay partly in this parish, and partly in Logie Wester. 4 

In 1574 King James VI. confirmed a charter by Robert Monro of Foulis to Marjory Mac- 
kanze the sister of Colin Mackanze of Kintailc in her virginity, granting to her the liferent 
of the lands of Mekle Findoun, extending to a davach, in the earldom of Ross, to be held 
of the crown. 5 In 1587 the same king confirmed a charter of John bishop of Ross, granting 
in heritage to Hugh Monro in Litle Findoun the lands of Litle Findoun in the diocese of 
Ross. 6 In 1608 Robert Monro was served heir male of entail and provision to Master Hector 
Monro of Foullis his father in the lands of Meikill Findon with the pertinents, namely, 
Baddrcan, Ballegyle, and Teazet, with the brewhouse and its croft, in the lordship of Ard- 
meanach. 7 In 1C35 Hugh Lord Fraser of Lovat was served heir male to his father Symon 
Lord Fraser of Lovat in the same lands, included in the barony of Foullis. 8 

There is a village at Culbokie, at which are held four yearly fairs. 9 



CULLICUDDEN. 

Culicuden 10 Cullicuddin" Cullicudden 12 Cullicudyne 13 Cullicudiri 14 
Cully cuddin 15 Killecuddin 16 Cullecuddin 17 Culicudin 18 Coulicud- 
din 19 Culliecuddin. 20 (Map, No. 31.) 

IN 1662 the parishes of Cullicudden and Kirkmichael were united by act of parliament. 21 

The united parish extends for some miles along the shore of the Cromarty Firth, from which 
the ground rises gradually for about two miles, after which it slopes into a cultivated valley, 

I MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaen. Macfarlane. Oldand 12 A.D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. A. D. 
NewStat. Ace. 2 See LOGIE WESTER, pp. 548,549. 1662. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. vii. p. 439. 

< Register of Ministers. l3 A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. 

4 See LOGIE WESTER, p. 550. > 4 A.I). 1561-1566. Ibid. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. tbl. 55. A. D. 1580. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 2. 

6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol. 78. "> A. D. 1580. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 27. 

7 Retours. 8 Ibid. ' New Stat. Ace. " A. D. 1600-1700. Macfarlane's Geog. Collect. 
10 A. D. 1227. Regist. Morav., p. 82. Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. 

II Circa A. D. 1535. Libellus Taxationum. A.I). 19 Circa A. D. 1640. Blaeu. 

1574. Book of Assignations. A. D. 1580. Reg. Sec. M A.D. 1662. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. vii. pp. 439, 440. 
Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 39. 2 " Ibid. See post. 



CULLICUDDEN.] PAROCHIALES. 553 

and then rises again gradually to the top of the Mulbuy, at that part 800 feet above the 
sea. 1 Cullicudden included the western portion of the united parish. 3 

In the year 1227 Jeronimus the parson of Culieuden was present at Kenedor in Moray at 
the settlement of a dispute between the bishops of Moray and of Ross about the churches of 
Kyntalargyn and Ardrosser. 8 In 1275 the church appears to have been taxed along with 
other Scotch benefices for relief of the holy land. 4 At the Eeformation the parson of Culli 
cudden was David Dunbar. 5 In 1574 William Monro Hucheson was reader at the same 
church. 6 In 1580 (14 October) King James VI. presented Master George Thonisoun to the 
parsonage of Killecuddin, vacant by the decease of Master David Dunbar. 7 In the same year 
(1 December) he presented William Monro Hucheonsoun to the same parsonage, vacant by 
decease of the same Master David. 8 The parson of Cullycuddin was a canon of the cathedral. 9 
In 1662 the commissioners for the plantation of kirks united the parishes of Cullicudden and 
Kirkuiichaell into one parish church, to be called the parish and church of Kirkmichael, and 
to be built at Reisolace, in favour of Sir John Wrwhart of Cromertie, and ordained that, until 
the new church should be built, the parishioners should attend at the church of Culliecuddin 
then standing; the stipend to be paid by Sir John, and to consist of 400 marks, 2 chalders 
bear and 2 chalders meal Linlithgow measure, with the vicarage teinds of both parishes and 
50 marks for communion elements ; and Sir John to have right to the glebes of Cullicudden 
and Kirkmichael on the entry of the minister to the new glebe designed for him at Reiso 
lace. 10 In the same year the union of the two parishes was ratified by King Charles II. and 
the parliament. 11 

The church of Cullicudden, dedicated to Saint Martin, stood originally at Kilmartm or Saint 
Martin's in the west end of the parish, where its foundations and the bury ing-ground (now 
disused) may still be seen. 12 The site appears to have been changed previously to the year 
1641, and the church built at Cullicudden on the shore of the Firth, where one of its 
gables is still standing. 13 The parish is still locally known as Sgire-a -Mhartinn, the parish of 
Saint Martin. 14 

In Baiamund's Roll the church is taxed at 53s. 4d., and in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued 
at 26, 13s. 4d. 15 At the Reformation the rental of the parsonage was stated as follows by Sir 
Alexander Pedder procurator for the parson The town of Cullicudden, 42 bolls; Drumnecu- 
dyne, 22 bolls ; Sanct Martenis, 9 bolls ; Kynebarch, 10 bolls ; the Craighouse, 4 bolls ; Eistir 
Culboll, 14 bolls ; Wastir Culboll, 20 bolls ; the Wodheid, 4 bolls ; the town of Braire, 16 
marks ; amounting in all to 7 chalders 13 bolls of victual and 10, 13s. 4d. in money. 16 In 1574 
the reader at Cullicuddin had for his stipend 20 marks and the kirklands. 17 

New Stat. Ace. 2 Ibid. 12 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. p. 630. MS. Maps in Adv. 

Begist. Moraviense, p. 82. Lib. Blaeu. Macfarlane. Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. 

Bisset's Rolls of Court. Ace. 

Book of Assumptions. 6 Book of Assignations. 13 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. p. 630. Old Stat Ace. 

Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 27. New Stat. Ace. 

Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 39. " New Stat. Ace. 15 MSS. in Adv. Lib. 

Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 2. 16 Book of Assumptions. 

'" Acta Parl. Scot, vol. vii. pp. 439, 440. " Ibid. 17 Book of Assignations. 

VOL. II. 4 A 



554 ORIGINES [CULLICUDDEN. 

In 1328 King Eobcrt Bruce appears to have settled a controversy between Hugh Earl of Eoss 
and Sir Andrew de Moravia about the lands of Dromcudyn and Munlochy. 1 The town of 
Drumnecudyne, as we have seen, is about 1561 enumerated among the lands of this parish. 2 In 
1586 King James VI. granted in heritage to William Keith the master of his wardrobe the lands 
of Drumquhidden, for the yearly payment of 6, 13s. 4d., 2 chalders 6 bolls 1 firlot of bear, 
4 bolls of oats, 1 mart, 1 mutton, 48 poultry, 20s. of bondage silver, 10 reek hens, and 80 
loads of fuel. 3 In 1666 John Monro of Ardulzie was served heir to his father Hugh Monro of 
Ardulzie in the davach of the town and lands of Drumcuddin in the barony of Delnie, lordship 
of Ardmeanach, and sheriffdom of Eoss.* 

In 1350 William Earl of Eoss and Lord of Sky granted to Adam of Vrchard the son of the 
deceased William of Vrchard the davach of Brehe within the maresium of Fernewyr in the 
sheriffdom of Innernes. 5 In 13G9 King David confirmed a grant, which William Earl of Eoss 
made to Alexander of Saint Clair the son of the deceased Thomas of Saint Clair, of the whole 
davach of land of Bray infra maresium de Fornewyr in the sheriffdom of Innernys. 6 In 1533 
King James V. confirmed a charter, granted by Thomas Vrquhard sheriff of Cromerty to his son 
and apparent heir Alexander and Beatrix Innes his wife, of three oxgangs of the lands of Brey in 
the earldom of Eoss. 7 In 1564 Walter Urquhart was served heir to his father Alexander Urquhart 
sheriff of Cromartie in the 5 oxgangs of Brey in the lordship of Ardmanache, of the old extent 
of 8, 8s. 2^d. 8 The town of Braire is enumerated above among the lands of the parish as stated 
between 1561 and 1566. 9 In 1577 King James VI. confirmed a grant by Walter Urquhart 
sheriff of Cromartie to Elizabeth Makkanze his wife of the liferent of a davach of land called the 
lands of Bray, and of a davach called Bralangall, in the sheriffdoms of Innernes and Cromartie 
respectively, as full satisfaction for her terce of all the lands and other property belonging to 
Walter which she might claim in the event of his death. 10 In 1599 Thomas Urquhart was served 
heir to his grandfather Walter Urquhart sheriff of Cromerthie in the 5 oxgangs of the lands of 
Brey in the lordship of Ardmanach, of the old extent of 4. u In 1617 the same lands were 
resigned by John Urquhart in favour of James Fraser of Brey. 12 

In 1557 David bishop of Eoss, perpetual commendator of Cambuskynneth, granted to his 
brother Eobcrt Leslie the lands of the baronies of Ferindonald and Ardmanoch, including among 
others the lands of Eister Culbo and the alehouse and alehouse croft of Saint Martin ; the grantee 
paying yearly for Eister Culbo 6 marks and as grassum 26s. 8d., 4 bolls of ferme victual, half a 
custom mart, 2 muttons, 12 poultry, 2 kids, 40 eggs valued at 6d., 100 loads of custom fuel, 8 
loads ' lie takturris,' 2 bolls of custom oats, and 1 boll of ' suggeroun aitis' and for the alehouse 
and croft of Saint Martin 10s. with 3s. 4d. as grassum ; paying also as arriage and carriage, and 
turf or fuel, for the whole lands 30s. with 13s. 4d. in augmentation of the rental, and performing 

1 Rob. Index, p. 28, no. II 2 . Retours. " Book of Assumptions. 

- Book of Assumptions. ' Cromarty Titles. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliv. fol. 42. 

3 R.'g. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. ff. 46-48. 4 Retonrs. Bralangall, now Braelangwell, is in the parish of Kirk- 

5 Cromarty Titles. michael. 

G Cromarty Titles. Rob. Index, p. 58, no. 11 ; p. 91, " Retours. The extent here given is less than half 

no. 274. of the extent given in the retour of 1564. 

; Cromarty Titles. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 177. 12 Cromarty Titles. 



CTJLI.ICUDDEN.] PAEOCHIALES. 555 

three suits at the three head courts held yearly at the canonry of Ross. 1 In the same year 
Queen Mary confirmed the grant. 2 Between 1561 and 1566, as we have seen, the lands of 
Eistir and Westir Culboll and of Sanct Martenis are enumerated among the lands of the parish. 3 
About the same period William Sinclare rector of Olrik, canon of Caithnes, and commissioner of 
Henry bishop of Ross, granted to Thomas Vrquhart the son of the deceased Alexander Vrquhart 
sheriff of Crombathy, and to the heirs male of his body, with remainder to Arthur Vrquhart his 
brother german and his male heirs, to James their brother gennan and his male heirs, to John 
their brother german and his male heirs, and to Walter Vrquhart their eldest brother and his 
male heirs whomsoever bearing the surname and arms of Vrquhart, the lands of Kilquhone 
(in Lumlair) extending to a quarter davach, and the lands of Eister Culbo extending to a half 
davach, belonging to the bishop as part of the patrimony of the bishoprick.* In 1578 Alex 
ander bishop of Ross, with the consent of the dean and canons, granted for life to his servitor 
William Fergussoun ' chirurgeane' a yearly pension out of the dues belonging to the bishop from 
certain lands in Ross which belonged in heritage to Walter Urquhart sheriff of Cromartie, 
including Sanctmartynis paying yearly 26s. 8d. mail, 8s. lid. gersum, 7s. l^d. in augmenta 
tion of mail and gersum, the quarter of a mart, 1 mutton, 3 capons, 3 poultry, 1 kid with eggs, 
2 firlots ' sudgerone' oats, and 1 pound of hemp and the alehouse of Sanctmartynis paying in 
mail 26s. 8d., in gersum 8s. lid., and in augmentation 2s. 8d. 5 In 1585 King James VI. con 
firmed the grant of Saint Martin's, and in 1587 he confirmed the grant of Eister , Culbo. 6 

The lands of Kynebarch, as above stated, appear among the lands of this parish between 1561 
and 1566. 7 Between the years 1565 and 1571 John bishop of Ross granted for life to Walter 
Vrquhart sheriif of Cromartie and Elisabeth M'Kenzie his wife, and to Henry Urquhart their 
second son and his heirs male, with remainder to Walter's heirs whomsoever bearing the surname 
and arms of Vrquhart the lands of Kinbeachie extending to a half davach, the brewhouse of Kin- 
beachie with its croft, and the mill of Kinbeachie, then occupied by Walter and his tenants, in 
the earldom of Ross and sheriffdom of Innernes. 8 In 1578 Alexander bishop of Ross granted 
for life to his servitor William Fergussoun ' chirurgeane' a yearly pension out of certain dues 
belonging to the bishop from the lands of Kinbeachie with the mill, and other lands in the 
diocese ; the lands of Kinbeachie paying yearly 7, 4s. Scots in feu mails, 4 bolls ferme, 2 bolls 
custom oats, 1 boll ' sudgerone' oats, the half of a custom mart, 2 muttons, 6 poultry, 2 kids with 
their eggs, as the ferme and dues and the mill of Kinbeachie paying yearly 20 bolls ferme and 
' ane gals.' 9 In 1580 King James VI. confirmed a charter by Walter Urquhart sheriff of 
Crummarty, granting certain lands to Elizabeth Ros in special warrandice of the lands of 
Kinbeachy. 10 In 1584 he confirmed the grant of bishop John, and in 1585 the grant of bishop 
Alexander. 11 In 1603 Thomas Urquhart sheriff of Cromarthie was served heir to his father 
Henry Urquhart sheriff apparent in the lands of Kinbachie extending to a half davach, the 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 581. Reg. Sec. Sig., 7 Book of Assumptions, 
vol. xxix. fol. 9. 2 Ibid. 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 45. 

3 Book of Assumptions. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. fol. 82. 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol. 169. w Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvi. fol. 110. See KIRKMI- 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. fol. 82. CHAEL, p. 557. 

6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. fol. 82 ; vol. Iv. fol. 169. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 45 ; vol. liii. fol. 82. 



556 ORIGINES [KIRKMICHAEL. 

alehouse of Kinbachie with its croft, and the mill of Kinbachie, in the bishoprick of Boss, of the 
extent of 7, 4s. feuferme and other dues. 1 In 1630 Thomas Urquhart was served heir to his 
brother Walter Urquhart fear of Kinbeachie in the same lands, alehouse, and mill. 2 

Of eight yearly fairs granted in 1641 by King Charles I. to the burgh of Inverness the fifth 
was to be held on 10 November called Martimes fair, ' quhilk was haldin of auld at Sanct Mar- 
tenis kirk in Ardmannoche now lyand waist.' 8 In 1661 the grant of those fairs was confirmed by 
King Charles II.* 

On the lands of Craighouse, about a mile and a half west from the churchyard of Cullicudderi 
on the Cromarty Firth, stood the castle of Craighouse, named also Castlecraig, and in Gaelic 
Tigh-na-craig. 5 In the end of the sixteenth century it is said to have belonged to the William 
sons of Craighouse, and afterwards to have been a seat of the bishops of Ross. 6 It is mentioned 
bva writer of the seventeenth century as ' Craighous with a tour of 4 hous height.' 7 The tower 
or wing which still remains is 50 feet in height, and consists of four heavily-arched stories, with 
turrets, bartizans, and stone roof the lower half having strongly vaulted apartments, and the 
upper half being furnished with wooden floors. 8 On the land side it was defended by a ditch 
and a high wall, and the rock on which it stands is perpendicular towards the sea. 9 

In the united parish are numerous encampments, generally near the shore, and numerous 
cairns or tumuli which when opened are usually found to contain graves made of slabs, and in 
these are found ashes and remains of armour. 10 



KIRKMICHAEL. 

Kilinicliacll 11 Kirkmichael 12 Kirkmichaell 13 Kirkmy chell 14 Car- 
ruicliaell 1B Kirkmichell 16 Kirkmichel. 17 (Map, No. 32. ) 

THIS parish, united to Cullicudden in 1662, forms the eastern portion of the united parish, and 
has the same general features as Cullicudden. 18 It is locally known as Sgire-a-mhicail (the parish 
of Saint Michael.) 19 

In 1533 a charter is witnessed by Master John Innes rector of Kirkmiehell. 20 In 1547 
Queen Mary presented Robert Marioribanks to the prebend of Kirkmichael in the cathedral 
church of Ross, vacant by the decease of Master John Innes. 21 In 1548 she presented Thomas 

I Rotours. 2 ibid. 13 A. D. 1548. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxii. fol. 59. A.D. 
3 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. p. 630. . 1574. Book of Assignations. Circa A. D. 1640. MS. 
* Ibid., vol. vii. p. 112. Maps in Adv. Lib. A. D. 1662. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. 

5 Macfarlane. Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. vii. p. 439. 

6 Old Stat. Ace. * Macfarlane. 14 A. D. 1570. Register of Ministers. 

Old Stat. Ace. ' My Schools and Schoolmasters,' 15 A.D. 1585. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Hi. fol. 106. 

pp. 51, 222. 9 Old Stat. Ace. I0 Ibid. 16 A. D. 1586. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fol. 17. 

II Circa A.D. 1535. Libellus Taxationnm. " Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. 
12 A.D. 1547. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 15. A.D. I8 See CULLICTJDDEN, p. 552. 

1587. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol. 36. Circa A. D. 1640. > 9 New Stat. Ace. *> Cromarty Titles. 

Blaeu. A.D.16G2. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. vii. pp. 439, 440. 21 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 15. 



KIRKMICHAEL.] PAROCHIALES. 557 

Marioribankis, the son of Master Thomas Marioribankis burgess of Edinburgh, to the same pre 
bend, vacant by the decease of Robert Marioribankis. 1 In 1570 and 157-4 Alexander Clunes 
was reader at Kirkmichael. 2 In 1580, 1585, and 1586 the rector of Kirkmichell appears to have 
been Master Thomas Marioribanks. 3 In 1587 King James VI. presented Alexander Reid to 
the vicarage of Kirkmichael, vacant by the decease of Sir James Gray. 4 

The church, dedicated to Saint Michael, stood in the east end of the parish within a few yards 
of the sea on the Cromarty Firth, where remain its western gable, its belfry, and a bell still used 
at funerals. 5 The church of the united parish, apparently built in 1774, stands at Resolis hi 
Kirkmichael on the site of a former. 6 

In Baiamund's Roll the church is taxed at 53s. 4d., and in the Taxatio Sec. xvi. at 18, 12s., 
its yearly value in the Libellus Taxationum being 40 marks. 7 The reader at Kirkmichael had as 
his stipend in 1570 the sum of 20, and 1574 the sum of 20 marks with the kirklands. 8 

In 1551 Queen Mary granted to Elizabeth M'Canzeoch the liferent of half the lands of 
Bowskaly, Birkis, and Belblair, in the barony and sheriffdom of Cromertye, resigned by the 
sheriff Thomas Vrquhart. 9 In 1557 David bishop of Ross, perpetual commendator of Cambus- 
kynneth, granted to his brother Robert Leslie certain lands in the lordship of Ardmanoch, 
including the lands of Eister Balblair with the alehouse ; the grantee paying yearly for those 
lands, otherwise called Kirkmichaell, 4 marks, with 17s. lOd. grassum, the fourth of a custom 
mart, 1 mutton, 6 poultry, 1 pound of hemp (canabu), 60 loads of fuel, and 2 bushels (modiis) of 
' suggeroun' oats and for the alehouse of Kirkmichell 12s., 6 capons, 6 geese, and 4s. grassum. 10 
In the same year Queen Mary confirmed the grant. 11 In 1580 King James VI. confirmed a 
charter by Walter Vrquhart sheriff of Crummarty, granting in liferent to Elisabeth Ros (then 
unmarried), and in heritage to his heirs by her, with remainder to his own heirs otherwise, the 
towns and lands of Wester Ballano and Ballaiskaillie, with all their pertinents, namely, Auch- 
nintyne and the other pendicles and outsets, in the barony and sheriffdom of Crummarty, in 
special warrandice of the lands and town of Kinbeachy, with the mill and other pertinents in 
the same barony and sheriffdom, and to be held of the crown. 12 

In 1577 King James VI. confirmed a grant of the liferent of Bralangall in the sheriffdom of 
Cromartie by Walter Vrquhart sheriff of Cromartie to his wife Elisabeth Makkanze. 13 

On trenching a moor on the glebe of Resolis there were discovered the foundations of a 
circular building like those known as Pict's houses, and imbedded in the soil a stone vessel 
four inches in diameter and three-fourths of an inch in thickness. 14 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxii. fol. 59. 6 New Stat. Ace. See CULLICUDDEN, p. 553. 

2 Register of Ministers. Book of Assignations. 7 MSS. in Adv. Lib. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 2; vol. Hi. fol. 106; 8 Register of Ministers. Book of Assignations, 
vol. liv. fol. 17. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiv. fol. 116. 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol. 36. 10 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 581. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

5 MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaen. Miller's Scenes vol. xxix. fol. 9. See CULLICUDDEN, p. 554, 555. 
and Legends, pp. 429, 430. New Stat. Ace. An anec- " Ibid. 

dote related in the Scenes and Legends seems to imply 12 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvi. fol. 110. 

that the cemetery of Kirkmichael was of old considered 13 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliv. fol. 42. See CULLICUDDEN, 

a sanctuary. p. 554. u New Stat. Ace. 



558 ORIGINES [CROMARTY. 



CROMARTY. 

Cromarte 1 Crumarty e Crumbathy 3 Oomartie 4 Cromardy 5 - 
Oomarty 6 Cromertie. 7 (Map, No. 33.) 

THIS parish is composed of the north-east portion of the peninsula called the Black Isle, ter 
minating eastward in the precipice called the southern Sutor, and stretches for about 4 miles 
along the shore of the Moray Firth on the east, and about 6 along that of the Firth of Cromarty 
on the north and west. On the east it presents to the Moray Firth a range of lofty precipices, 
attaining the height of about 470 feet above the sea. 8 On the north and west it slopes gradually 
towards the other firth, the slope terminating in an abrupt terrace nearly 100 feet above the 
sea-level, and from its base a lower and level terrace extends to the shore. 9 The coast in the 
end of the sixteenth century extended fully a quarter of a mile farther seaward than at present. 10 
The bay of Cromarty at the entrance of the Firth, the Sikirsund of Norse writers, is thus 
correctly described by Buchanan ' The German Ocean, opening a way to itself among the 
stupendous cliffs of the most lofty rocks, expands within into a spacious basin, affording a safe 
harbour and certain refuge against every tempest ; for the passage is not difficult, and once 
entered the largest fleets may ride secure from the winds and waves.' 11 

At the Eeformation a fourth of the teindsheaves of the parish of Cromarte was part of the 
prebend of the chancellor of Eoss, Master Duncan Chalmer ; a fourth was part of the treasury 
then held in lease by Matthew Hamiltoun of Mylneburne; and a fourth was annexed to the 
prebend of the dean, Master Mungo Monypenny. 12 At the same period the vicarage was held 
by Sir John Andirsoun (or Hendirsoun) chamberlain of Moray. 13 In 1569, 1574, and 1576 
James Burnet was reader at Cromartie, and in 1574 and 1576 Master John Eobertsoun treasurer 
of Eoss was minister. 1 * About the year 1578 Alexander Vrquhart dean of Eoss, with the consent 
of the canons during the vacancy of the see, granted for life to Walter Vrquhart sheriff of 
Cromartie and to his nearest lawful heir a yearly pension of 3 chalders 12 bolls of victual with 

1 A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. 10 Scenes and Legends, pp. 28, 29. 

2 A. D. 1561-1566. Ibid. " Buch. Hist., lib. i. c. 30. Macpherson's Geogra- 

3 A.I). 1561-1566. Ibid. phical Illustrations. Miller's Scenes and Legends, p. 

4 A. D. 1569. Register of Ministers. A. D. 1574- 25. The cliffs described by Buchanan are those known 
1576. Book of Assignations. A. D. 1583. Reg. Sec. as the Sutors, which flank the entrance to the Firth. 
Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 89. A. D. 1585. Reg. Sec. Sig., In Ross, says Bishop Leslie, is the estuary of Cromarty, 
vol. Hi. fol. 105. Circa A. D. 1640. Blaeu. A. D. abounding in varieties of the best fish, and so safe a 
1644. Retours. station for ships that it is well named by geographers 

5 Circa A.D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. the Portus Salutis (a mere Latin translation of the 

6 Circa A. D. 1640. Ibid. 'Sikirsund'). De Gestis Scotorum, pp. 16, 17. 

7 A. D. 1661. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. vii. p. 106. 12 Book of Assumptions. 
* New Stat. Ace. Ibid. 

3 Ibid. Miller's Scenes and Legends, pp. 26, 27. " Register of Ministers. Book of Assignations. 



CBOMABTT.] PAROCHIALES. 559 

'half cheritie', 5 wedders, and 40s. in money, to be paid out of the quarters of the teinds of 
the parish of Cromartie belonging to the deanery in the following proportions, namely ; Of the 
quarter teinds of the town of Cromartie 16 bolls of bear with ' half cheritie,' 40s., and a wedder 
of the quarter teinds of Navitie 10 bolls of bear, ' half cheritie,' and a wedder of the 
quarter teinds of Eistir Fames 8 bolls of bear, ' half cheritie,' and a wedder of the quarter 
teinds of Dauidstoun 7 bolls of bear with 'half cheritie' of the quarter teinds of Peddistoun 
8 bolls of bear, ' half cheritie,' and a wedder of the quarter teinds of Litill Fames 8 bolls of 
bear, ' half cheritie,' and a mutton and of the quarter teinds of Vddall 3 bolls of bear with 
' half cheritie ;' reserving only the pension given by the dean to John Sympsoun of Bannauis 
and Mariorie Abirnethy, amounting to 4 bolls of bear, ' half cheritie,' and a wedder, out of the 
quarter teinds of Eister Fames ; the lease to begin in 1578, saving the rights, services, suffrages, 
and prayers, formerly due to the King. 1 In 1583 King James VI. presented Master Kobert 
Williamsoun minister to the vicarage of Cromartie, vacant by the decease of Sir John Ander- 
soune. 2 In 1585 King James VI. confirmed the lease of 1578. 3 In 1661, on a petition from 
Master Patrick Durhame, late minister of Ardnaseir, who had been appointed for life to the 
deanery of Ross, the parliament ordered the heritors and others to pay to him 40 bolls of teind 
victual, with certain customs and silver dues, payable to him as dean out of the teinds of Rose- 
markie, which for three years they had paid to the minister of Cromertie.* 

The church stood originally on ground now covered by the sea, and a sand-bank which still 
retains the name of the Old Kirk apparently marks its site. 5 About the middle of the last 
century after a violent storm from the north-east the beach was found to be strowed with human 
bones, and among them were several blocks of hewn stone. 6 One of the latter, the cornerstone 
of a cornice, is still to be seen upon the shore. 7 The present church stands at the east end 
of the town near the base of the higher terrace above described. 8 

Between 1561 and 1566 Sir Andro Robertsoun was chaplain of the chaplainry of Saint Reguie 
in the diocese of Ross. 9 In 1584 King James VI. confirmed a charter by James Burnet chaplain 
of Saint Regula (Regulus) near the burgh of Cromartie, granting, with the consent of Walter 
Vrquhart sheriff of Cromartie, and of the bailies and community of the burgh, the patrons of the 
chaplainry, to Alexander Vrquhart the son of Arthur Vrquhart of Balleblair and to his heirs 
male, with remainder in succession to John Vrquhart the uncle of Alexander and his heirs male 
bearing the surname and arms of Vrquhart, and to Walter Vrquhart and his heirs male bearing 
the same surname and arms, the lands of the chaplainry, with the manse, garden, and croft, 
extending to 4 acres of land, lying between the lands of the sheriff on the west and the lands 
of Alexander Clunes on the east. 10 The chapel, dedicated to Saint Regulus or Rule, abbot and 
confessor, who is said to have brought into Scotland the relics of Saint Andrew, stood on a 
detached wooded knoll east of the town of Cromartie, having on the south a deep ravine with a 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Hi. fol. 105. 5 Millers Scenes and Legends, p. 104. 

'* Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 89. 6 Ibid., p. 29. 7 Ibid. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Hi. fol. 105. 8 New Stat. Ace. 9 Book of Assumptions. 

Acta Parl. Scot, vol. vii. p. 106. 10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 34. 



560 OKIGINES [CBOMABTT. 

small stream. 1 The southern wall has been destroyed by the ground giving way from the con 
tinued action of the stream ; the ruins of the other walls still remain. 2 Attached to the west 
end was the tomb of the Urquharts of Cromarty, of which almost the only remains are a single 
tier of hewn ashler having a sloping base and surmounted by a Gothic moulding. 8 Tradition 
says that at the Reformation a valuable historical record belonging to the chapel was carried to 
France by the priest.* In the last century there was found in a recess of one of the walls a 
rubricated manuscript, the nature and subsequent fate of which are unknown. 5 

On a steep ridge overlooking the Moray Firth is the site of a chapel dedicated to Saint Beimet 
(one of the saints named Benedict) of which the only vestiges are a heap of stones and a grassy 
mound. 6 Near it stood a stone trough termed the Fairy's Cradle, destroyed about the year 1745 ; 
and in the neighbourhood is Saint Bennet's Well, even in recent times believed to possess the 
virtue of curing the sick, by whom, when they drank the water, a small rag was left as an 
offering on a thorn bush overhanging the well. 7 

In the parish were other three chapels, two of which have totally disappeared, and the dedica 
tion of which is unknown ; the third, dedicated to Saint Duthace, is now represented by a mound 
and stones like the chapel of Saint Bonnet, and has in its vicinity a well which still bears Saint 
Duthace's name. 8 

There was a chaplainry in the cathedral church endowed from the lands of Navity. 9 In the 
seventeenth century it was a popular belief that the inhabitants of the sheriffdom of Cromarty 
were at the day of final doom to be judged on the moor of Navity. 10 

Between 1561 and 1566 the valuation of the church of Cromarty was included in that of the 
chancellary, treasury, and deanery of Boss, to each of which a fourth of the teinds belonged (the 
remaining fourth belonging apparently to the bishop). 11 At the same date we have on record the 
following valuation of the vicarage of Cromarty : ' The rentall of the vicarage of Crumarty within 
the dyocie of Ros quhan all dewtie pertening thairto was ansuerit Payment zeirlie xxii merkis, 
the curat being sustenit ; and now lytill thairof ansuerit except the teind of the yeardis within 
the town, quhilk will be vi bollis victuall or thairby Pertenis to Sir Johne Andirsoun chalmer- 
land of Murray. Mr. Thomas Ker at the command of Sir Johne Hendirsoun possessour of the 
foirsaid benefice.' 12 In 1569 the reader at Cromartie had for his stipend 20 ; and in 1574 and 
1576 he had 20 marks and the kirklands. 13 In 1574 Master John Robertsoun treasurer had for 
his stipend as minister at Chanonrie and Cromartie 118, 10s. 8^d. ; and in 1576, as minister at 
Cromartie, ' his stipend fourty pundis, thairof the rest of the thrid of his awin thesaurarie of Ross 
not assignit to the ministers and reidars serving at the kirkis thairof.' 14 

1 Miller's Scenes and Legends, pp. 191, 207. The c Ibid., p. 104. The saint was probably Benedicta 

Calendar of the Romish Church assigned two festivals the Virgin, commemorated on 8 or 21 October, 

to Saint Regulus, one on 31 March, and one on 17 ' Ibid. " Ibid. 

October. Camerarius (p. 180) gives 17 October as 9 See ROSEMARKIE post. 

the day of Saint Regulus. Sir H. Nicolas gives 28 Scenes and Legends, p. 216. 

August. i Book of Assumptions. 

- Scenes and Legends, p. 20G. 2 Book of Assumptions. 

3 Ibid., pp. 206, 207. 3 Register of Ministers. Book of Assignations. 

4 Ibid., p. 105. 6 Ibid. * Book of Assignations. 



CROMARTY.] PAROCHIALES. 561 

The value of the chaplainry of Saint Kegule, as given up between 1561 and 1566 to the 
collector of thirds by Sir Alexander Pedder procurator of Sir Andro Robertsoun the chaplain, 
was 10. ! 

Of the other chaplainries we have no recorded valuation. 

The early history of the parish and district of Cromarty is apparently the same as that of 
the earldom of Boss. 2 The barony seems to have been co-extensive with the ancient sheriff- 
dom, and to have been held by the sheriffs, the first of whom on record is William de 
Monte Alto, who was sheriff of Crumbathyn in 1263. 3 The sheriff of Crumbhartyn appears 
in record in 1296 under King Edward I. of England. 4 In 1315 King Robert Bruce 
granted in heritage to Sir Hugh of Ross, the son and heir of William Earl of Ross, and the 
husband of Mauld the King's sister, the whole sheriffdom and burgh of Crumbathy, the grantee 
doing the forinsec service belonging to the land, saving to the King the custom called ' mala- 
tout.' 5 Before 1349 King David II. granted to Ada Urquhart the sheriffdom of Crombathie 
and sheriffship of the same, which William Earl of Ross (the son of Hugh) had resigned. 6 
From that year to 1370 Adam of TJrquhard, formerly styled lord of Inchrory, appears as 
sheriff of Cromady or Crumbathy. 7 His son John appears with him in 1369 as witness to a 
charter, and in 1398 John of Urquhard appears as sheriff of Cromardy. 8 In 1457 William 
Vrquhard in Crumbathy was one of two appointed by King James II. to assist his chancellor in 
visiting and reforming the hospitals in the diocese of Ross. 9 Between 1491 and 1493 occurred 
' the herschip of Cromartie,' that is, the plundering of the lands of Cromartie by Huchoun the 
Ros younger of Kilrawok and his accomplices, of whom the chief seem to have been Doule 
M'Gillecallum and William Alansone. 10 These carried away from the lands 600 cows, each 

worth 13s. 4d. 5 score of horses, each 26s. 8d. 50 score of sheep, each 2s 20 score of 

goats, each 2s. 200 swine, each 3s 20 score bolls of victual, each 6s. 8d. and 200 worth 
of household goods. 11 Master Alexander Vrquhart sheriff of Crommaty, proprietor of the lands, 
sued the parties for the restitution of the goods, and also for 100 of the mails of his lands 
' haldin wast be the said Huchoun younger and his complicis of twa yeris.' 12 The chiefs of the 
Clanchattane and Huchoun the Ros baron of Kilrawok became surety for the parties prosecuted ; 
the case was proved in court ; and in 1493 (5 February) the Lords of Council ordained that the 

1 Book of Assumptions. includes the parishes of Cromarty, Kirkmichael, and 

2 See DINGWALL, pp. 485, 486. Cullicuden.' Miller's Scenes and Legends, p. 4(i. 

3 Compota Camerar., vol. i. pp. 30*, 41*. This per- 4 Kotuli Scotise, vol. i. p. 25. 

son, affirmed by Sir Thomas Urquliart to have derived 5 Kilravock Charters. Rob. Index, p. 2, no. 50. 
his name from the hill on which the castle of Cromarty 6 Rob. Index, p. 45, no. 27. This seems to be the 

was built, and reckoned by him among his ancestors, first grant of Cromarty made to the Urquharts. Ada 

was in reality one of an Anglo-Norman family who came appears to have been the son of William of Vrchard, 

into Scotland in the preceding century, and whose name who was dead in 1350. Cromarty Titles, 
subsequently took the more familiar form Mowat. See " Charter penes Urquhart of Craigston. Balnagown 

Chalmers's Caledonia, vol. i. pp. 531,532; Reg. Morav., Charters. Kilravock Charters. Rob. Index, p. 35, nn. 

pp. 99, 114, 126, 279, 282 ; Regist. de Aberbrothoc, 20, 21 ; p. 86, nn. 204, 205 ; p. 100, no. 1. 
vol. i. pp. 93, 163, 187, 189-191, 200, 201, 205, 206, 227, 8 Rob. Index, p. 86, no. 204. Balnagown Charters. 
269, 323, 338. The barony, as afterwards held by the 9 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. p. 49. 
Urquharts, ' extended from the farthest point of the 10 The Family of Kilravock, pp. 162, 163. Acta Dom. 

southern Sutor to the hill of Kiubeakie, a tract -which Cone., p. 273. " Ibid. 12 Ibid. 

VOL. II. 4 B 



562 ORIGINES [CROMAKTY. 

baron of Kilrawok and Huchoun the Bos his son and apparent heir should pay the value to 
Master Alexander Vrquhart and his tenants John Vrquhart, Thomas Vrquhart, Thomas 
Vrquhart, William Smethissone, Andrew Holme, William Donaldsone, and others, and that their 
lands and goods should be dcstrained for it, reserving to Kilrawok and his son the right of prose 
cuting any of the accomplices of the latter for their share of the payment. 1 In 1494 (5 July) 
the case of Huchoun the Eos of Kilrawok against Sir Alexander of the His of Lochelche, Alane 
M'Eory, and others, for his relief at the hands of Master Alexander Vrquhart of 600 cows and 
oxen and other goods was continued by the Lords of Council to 4 August following, that more 
witnesses might be examined. 2 In the same year the sheriff of Crommaty and his tenants 
sued Huchoun Eos of Kilrawok for withholding from them ' the avalis and proffitis that thai 
micht haf haid ' of the goods taken from their lands ; and the Lords of Council (9 July) continued 
the case till 8 August, ordaining the sheriff to summon his witnesses. 3 By the year 1497 or 
1498 the baron of Kilravock had not succeeded in operating his relief against the Mackintoshes ; 
and between 1501 and 1503 the debt of 800 marks due to the Urquharts was by the arbitration 
of friends settled as follows That in lieu of 400 marks Huchone Rois the heir of Kilrawok, or, 
he failing, John Rois, the baron's second son, or any other his eldest son and heir, should marry 
Agnes L T rquhart the sheriff's daughter ; and that the other 400 marks should be secured over 
the lands of Kilravock and paid in yearly instalments of 40.* Master Alexander Vrquhard of 
Cromarty and sheriff of Cromarty appears in record in 1503 and 1504, and was dead in 1506. 5 
In the last named year King James VI. granted to Alexander Ogiluy of Far the marriage of 
Thomas Vrquhard the son and heir of the deceased sheriff. In 1510 Huchoun Eos and Agnes 
Urquhart were married, and the marriage contract, dated 4 November of that year, is witnessed 
by the same Thomas Urquhart of Cromyrty the son and heir of the deceased Alexander. 7 
In 1533, 1534, 1549, 1551, and 1552, the same Thomas Vrquhard (styled in the last named year 
Thomas Vrquharde of Fyseharie), appears in record as sheriff of Cromarty. 8 He seems to have 
died in 1557. a About the year 1533 he granted the lands of Inchrory and others to his son and 
apparent heir Alexander Vrquhard and his wife Beatrix Innes, the former of whom appears in 
1549 as Alexander Vrquhart of Ynchrorie the son and heir apparent of the same Thomas 
Vrquhart sheriff of Cromartie. 10 In 1564 Alexander Vrquhard appears as sheriff of Crombathy, 
and in 1565 he was dead. 11 He had five sons, Walter, John, James, Arthur, and Thomas, of 
whom Walter the eldest succeeded him. 12 Between 1565 and 1571 Walter Vrquhard sheriff of 

1 The Family of Kilravock, pp. 162, 163. Acta Dom. 9 In that year, according to the Calendar of Fearn, 
Cone., p. 273. died in his own palace Andrew Vrquhart sheriff of 

2 Acta Dom. Cone., p. 359. Cromarty, a person who so far as other records are 

3 Ibid., p. 368. concerned never existed. Thomas Vrquhard appears 

4 The Family of Kilravock, pp. 162, 163. to have been the ' Pater Hemon' of his descendant Sir 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ii. fol. 132; vol. iii. If. 1, 60. Thomas, but no existing record seems to justify the 

6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 60. title. See Miller's Scenes and Legends, pp. 52, 53. 

' The Family of Kilravock, p. 163. "> Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 177. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. 

8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 177 ; vol. xxiv. fol. 116; xxx. no. 419. 

vol. xxvi. fol. 10. Pitcairn's Crim. Trials, vol. i. p. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxii. fol. 46; vol. Iv. fol. 169. 
169*. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 419. u Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol. 169. 



CROMARTT.] PAROCHIALES. 553 

Cromartie appears in record with his wife Elisabeth M'Kenzie and Henry Vrquhart their second 
son ; in 1577 he again appears in record along with his wife Elisabeth Makkanze ; in 1578 Alex 
ander Vrquhart dean of Eos granted to him and his nearest lawful heir for life a yearly pension, 
above mentioned, from the dean's quarter teinds of the lands of Cromartie, namely, Navitie, Eister 
Fames, Dauidstoun, Peddistoun, Litill Fames, and Vddall ; and in 1585 he had a confirmation 
of the grant from King James VI. 1 In 1599 Thomas Urquhart was served heir to his grand 
father Walter Urquhart sheriff of Cromerthie in the lands and barony of Cromerthie, with the 
Castlehill called the Mothill of the same, and the yearly revenues of the burgh of Cromerthie, 
lying in the barony and sheriffdom of Cromerthie and in the office of sheriff of Cromerthie 
together of the old extent of 40, 12s. 7d. 2 In the same year and in 1603 Thomas Urquhart 
appears as the heir of his father Henry Urquhart sheriff apparent of Cromerthie. 3 In 1599 
appears in record John Wrquhart tutor of Cromertie, and in 1604 John Urquhart was served 
heir male in certain lands to his father Walter Urquhart sheriff of Cromartie (then apparently 
alive).* The latter and his son Henry the apparent sheriff were both dead in 1607, in which year 
Thomas Urquhart sheriff of Cromertie was served heir in certain lands to his uncle John. 5 In 
1630 Thomas Urquhart (apparently the son of the sheriff, and afterwards Sir Thomas) was 
served heir in the lands of Kinbeachie to his brother Walter the fear of those lands. 6 He was 
born in 1613, knighted by King Charles I. in 1641,' succeeded his father soon afterwards, and 
died in 1661. 7 In 1644 Master Thomas Eig of Athernie was served heir to his father William 
Eig of Athernie in a yearly revenue of 2000 from the lands and barony of Cromartie, and spe 
cially of those towns and parts of the barony called Dauidstoun, Pedistoun, Arnoche, and Femes, 
with the mill of Femes, in the barony and parish of Cromartie, of the extent of 1600 according 
to act of parliament. 8 Sir Thomas Urquhart was succeeded by his brother Alexander, who, 
dying in the course of a year afterwards, was succeeded by Sir John Urquhart of Craigfintrie the 
representative of another branch of the family. 9 

In 1529 died John of Dauidstoun (apparently John Denowne). 10 In 1536 appear in record 
John Denowne of Dauidstoun and his son Donald Denowne. 11 In 1547 Queen Mary granted 
to William Dennowne of Petnele the nonentry and other dues of certain lands which had been in 
her hands since the decease of Alexander Dunnvne of Dauidstoun. 12 In the same year she granted 
to John Dunnvne, the second son of John Dunnvne of Dauidstoun, certain lands resigned by 
John the elder, to whom the liferent was reserved. 13 In 1556 John Denowne of Davidstoun was 
dead, and Donald Denowne of Kenroy appears as his son and heir. 14 In 1578 and 1585, as we 
have seen, the lands of Dauidstoun appear among the lands of the parish, and in 1644 were 
inherited by Master Thomas Eig of Athernie from William Eig his father. 15 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 69 ; vol. xliv. fol. 42 ; Calendar of Feara. 

vol. li. fol. 45; vol. Hi. fol. 105. ' Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 583. 

J Retours. 3 i o ;a. 2 R eg . g ec . gig., vol. xxi. fol. 30. 

4 Kilravock Charters. Retours. 3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 33. 

5 Retours. Ibid. * Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. nn. 358, 393. Reg. Sec. 

7 Miller's Scenes and Legends, pp. 86, 87, 92. Sig., vol. xxviii. ff. 33, 70. 

8 Retours. 9 Scenes and Legends, p. 110. 13 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. lii. fol. 105. Retours. 



564 ORIGINES [CKOMARTY. 

In 1557 David bishop of Eoss granted to his brother Robert Leslie his lands in Ferindonald 
and Ardmanoch, including the lands of Vdwall, the grantee paying yearly for the latter G marks 
G shillings and 8 pence with 28s. lid. as grassum, 8 bolls of ferme victual, the half of a custom 
mart, 2 muttons, 12 poultry, 2 kids, 40 eggs valued at 6d., 2 bolls of custom oats, and 1 boll of 
'suggarunne' oats. 1 In the same year Queen Mary confirmed the grant. 2 In 1578 and 1585, as 
we have seen, Vddall is enumerated among the lands of the parish that paid tithe to the dean 
of Ross. 3 

The burgh of Cromarty (Crumbauchtyn) existed in the year 1263, when it appears to have 
had two provosts or aldermen (prepositi).* In 129G the Knights Templars had probably some 
property in the burgh, which King Edward I. by a mandate addressed to the sheriff of Crum- 
bhantyn ordered to be restored to the Master on swearing fealty. 5 In 1315 King Robert Bruce 
granted the burgh of Crumbathy, with all the burgesses, liberties, and pertinents, within and 
without it, to Sir Hugh of Ross the son and heir of William Earl of Ross, reserving to the 
King the custom called ' malatout.' 6 In the Inverness Museum is an old seal or cocket, sup 
posed to be of the reign of King Robert II. (1371-1390), and bearing the name of the 
burgh, Chrombte. 7 In 1472 William Urquhart was infeft in the burgh of Cromarty on a 
precept by John Earl of Ross. 8 In 1483 appears in record Thomas Rede bailie of Cromaty, 
and in 1492 David Dunnone bailie of the same burgh. 9 In 1505 King James IV. granted 
to Andro Aytoun captain of the castle of Striueling the customs of all the burghs and bounds 
between Banf and Orknay, for the yearly payment of 50 to the King's comptroller and 
others. 10 In 1533 appear in record Alexander Clwnes, Alexander Forbes, and Thomas Duff, 
burgesses of Cromarty. 11 In 1555 Queen Mary granted to Sir John Denvne a remission 
for the cruel slaughter of John Malty dwelling in the Newtoun of Cromerty. 12 Till about 
this period the burgh of Cromarty stood upon ground now covered by the sea, and before 
the end of the century another (apparently the ' Newtoun' above mentioned) had been formed 
farther from the sea, and to the eastward of the present town. 13 Its cross, bearing the date 
1578, still exists. 14 In 1592 among a number of articles referred by parliament to the privy 
council there was one entitled ' Ane article anent the heaven and port of Cromertie.' 15 In 
1593 King James VI. confirmed the privileges of the burgh of Cromarty as a royal burgh, and 
confirmed anew to the provost and magistrates the burgh lands, namely, those lying between the 
lands of Murehead, Boghous, and Bogs of Femes, belonging to the sheriff of Cromarty, on the 
west the lands of Ethie and the sea on the south and the sea on the east and north with 
the haven, raid, and harbour of the burgh in all places within the ' craiges callit the Sowteris.' 16 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 581. Reg. Sec. Sig., 9 Acta Part. Scot., vol. ii. p. 159. Acta Dora. Cone., 

vol. xxix. fol. 9. 2 Ibid. p. 236. > Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 30. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Hi. fol. 105. Cromarty Titles. 

4 Compota Camerar., vol. i. p. 41. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxvii. ff. 111-113. 

5 Rotuli Scotia;, vol. i. p. 25. Miller's Scenes and Legends, pp. 28, 29, 75-78. 

6 See above, p. 561. u Ibid., p. 275. 

' Miller's Scenes and Legends, p. 48. 15 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. iii. p. 586. 

9 Cromarty Titles. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. p. 627. 



CROMARTY.] PAROCHIALES. 565 

In 1599, as we have seen, Thomas Urquhart was served heir to his grandfather Walter Urquhart 
sheriff of Cromerthie in the yearly revenues of the burgh. 1 In 16-11 King Charles I. confirmed 
the charter granted in 1593 by King James VI. 2 In 1670 the town council alienated their lands 
to Sir John Urquhart of Cromarty for 5000 marks Scots and a yearly feu duty of 20 marks. 3 In 
1672 they represented to Parliament that for a long time there had been no trade within the 
burgh, and that through the imposition of many burdens it was both impoverished and depopu 
lated; and requested leave to demit their freedom and privileges as a royal burgh.* The request 
was granted, and Cromarty ordered to be expunged from the rolls of parliament, and no more to 
be accounted a royal burgh. 5 From that period the town appears to have gradually sunk into an 
inconsiderable village till about the year 1750, when its trade revived and its site was changed as 
at present. 6 The site of the original burgh, of which the last vestige disappeared in the present 
century, is now covered every tide by two fathoms of water, but seems to be still marked by the 
' Clach Malacha' (or Malloch), a large stone now a quarter of a mile from the shore, but in 
the seventeenth century surrounded by cornfields and clumps of wood. 7 Its successor is now 
represented by a road to the east of the present town bounded by fences and a few old houses, 
formerly its main street, and still known as the Old Causeway. 8 

In 1292 King Edward I. ordered Thomas of Braytoft, keeper of the castles of Invernar and 
Crumbarthyn, to deliver them up to King John Balliol. 9 The castle of Cromarty is traditionally 
said to have been besieged by the English in the time of Sir William Wallace, who is believed 
to have raised the siege. 10 It was probably granted, though not expressly mentioned, with the 
sheriffdom to Sir Hugh of Ross in 1315, and to Adam of Urquhart before 1349, and thence 
forward held by the Urquharts as sheriffs and barons of Cromarty. 11 In 1557 Andrew (Thomas) 
Urquhart sheriff of Cromarty is said to have died ' in his own palace.' 12 In 1599, as we have 
seen, Thomas Urquhart was served heir to his grandfather Walter Urquhart sheriff of Cromerthie 
in the lands and barony of Cromarty with the Castlehill called the Mothill of the same. 13 In 
1C43 Heu Eos of Tollie with two of his servants are said to have died suddenly ' in ane chamber 
in the castell of Cromartie.' u The castle stood on an angle of the terrace above the present 
town on the east side of a deep ravine. 15 It was built in the old turreted style, and defended 
on the south by a moat and high wall. 16 It was taken down in 1772, and in the surrounding 
ground were found human skeletons and urns containing human remains, both enclosed in graves 
made of flags. 17 The lintel of one of its fire-places, preserved at Kinbeakie in Resolis, bears the 
date 1651, the initials of Sir Thomas Urquhart, the names and eras of some of his supposed 
ancestors, and several curious devices. 18 

1 Retours. See p. 5G3. " See above, pp. 561, 5G4. 12 Calendar of Fearn. 

2 Acta Part. Scot., vol. v. p. 627. 13 See above, p. 563. " Calendar of Fearn. 

3 .M iin. Corp. Reports. 13 Miller's Scenes and Legends, p. 78. 

Acta Part. Scot., vol. viii. pp. 68, 69. 5 Ibid. '<* Ibid., pp. 78, 79. 17 Old Stat. Ace. 

Miller's Scenes and Legends, pp. 75, 275. 18 Scenes and Legends, pp. 82, 94, 95. For an inte- 

7 Ibid., pp. 28, 29. ' My Schools and Schoolmasters,' resting account of Sir Thomas and his writings see the 

p. 63. 8 Scenes and Legends, p. 75. same authority, pp. 86-103. See also ' The Works of 

9 Rotuli Scotiie, vol. i. p. 12. Sir Thomas Urquhart,' with a memoir, published by 

10 Scenes and Legends, p. 47. the Maitland Club. 



566 ORIGINES [CROMARTY. 

Close to the town stood an eminence called the Courthill (apparently now removed), on which 
the sheriff courts were held in early times. 1 

To the west of the present town is another eminence, having a hollow known as the Witch's 
Hole, and at one time the place of execution. 2 

The highest part of the Southern Sutor is still named the Gallowhill, and the remains of a 
cairn which crown it retain the name of the Gallows. 8 

On a hill behind the town a spot marked by a few shapeless hillocks is supposed to have 
been the scene of a battle between the English and Sir William Wallace, who is said to have 
laid an ambush for his enemies in a marshy hollow 4 miles south of Cromarty still known as 
Wallace' Slack. 4 The battle is supposed to be mentioned by Blind Harry, the biographer 
of Wallace, in the following lines 

Wallace raid throu the northland into playne 
At Crummade feill Inglismen thai slew 
The worthi Scottis till hym thus couth persew 
Returnd agayne and come till Abirdeyn 
With his blith ost upon the Lammes ewyn. s 

In the higher parts of the parish, and extending into the neighbouring parishes, is an extensive 
moor covered with numerous tumuli, supposed to mark the scene of a battle ; and within the 
parish is the site of an encampment supposed to be Danish. 6 At the east end of the moor 
about 6 miles from Cromarty is a large heap of stones known as the Grey Cairn. 7 Near it was 
another long since destroyed. 8 

1 Scenes and Legends, p. 83. ' MS. of Wallace in Adv. Lib., fol. 55. Jamieson. 

2 Ibid. book vii. 11. 1084-1088. 

1 Ibid. 6 Scenes and Legends, pp. 20, 21. Old Stat. Ace. 

1 Ibid., pp. 47, 48. Ibid. * Ibid. 



ROSEMARKIE.] 



PAROCHIALES. 



567 



ROSEMARKIE. 

Rosmarky l Rosmerky 2 - - Roismerky 3 Rosmerkie 4 Rosmerkin 5 - 
Ramskye 6 Channonrie 7 Channonerye 8 Chanonrie 9 Rosmarkny 10 
Rosmarkie 11 Rosemarkie 12 Chanrie. 13 (Map, No. 34.) 

THIS parish, extending from near Fortrose to the burn of Ethie, has in its southern part a 
sandy coast which includes the Ness of Chanonry about a mile in length, and in its northern 
part a bold rocky coast diversified by perpendicular precipices and wild ravines. 14 From the 
shore it slopes at some parts to the top of the Mulbuy, and in the interior it is general!}' 
arable. 15 

The origin of the church of Rosmarky is ascribed to Saint Boniface surnamed Queretinus, 
an Italian who in the seventh or eighth century is said to have come into Scotland for the pur 
pose of inducing the church there to conform to the practice of the church of Rome, and, after 
founding churches in many parts of the country, to have settled at Rosmarky, and to have built 
there a church, in which he was afterwards buried. 16 The church does not appear in any known 
record from the period of its foundation till the year 1510, in which it is mentioned in the 
Aberdeen Breviary as the burial-place of Saint Moloc. 17 In 1529 appears in record Sir William 
Gray vicar of Rosmarky deceased. 18 In 1546 Queen Mary presented Sir Thomas Stevinsoun to 
the vicarage of Rosmerky, vacant by the decease of Sir Thomas Gray, or by his resignation, or in 
any other way whatsoever. 19 In 1549 the same queen presented George Dunbar to the vicarage, 
vacant or when vacant by the resignation of Sir Thomas Stevinsoun. 20 Between 1561 and 1566 a 
fourth of the teinds of Rosmarky belonged to the chancellor of Ross, a fourth to the treasurer, 
and a fourth to the dean. 21 At the same period the vicarage was held by George Dunbar parson 
of Kilmowr (Wester), and apparently the presentee of 1549. 22 Between 1569 and 1571 William 



1 A. D. 1510. Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, 
estiv. fol. 7. A. D. 1529. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. viii. fol. 
81. A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. A. D. 
1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. 

2 A. D. 1546. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xix. fol. 75. A. D. 
1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. 

3 A. D. 1549. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiii. fol. 7. 

4 A. D. 1561-1566. Book of Assumptions. 

5 A. D. 1561-1566. Ibid. 

6 A. D. 1561-1566. Ibid. 

7 A. D. 1569-1571. Register of Ministers. 

8 A. D. 1570. Ibid. 

9 A. D. 1574-1576. Book of Assignations. 

10 A. D. 1574-1576. Ibid. 

11 Circa A. D. 1640. Blaeu. A. D. 1649. Retours. 

12 Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. A. D. 
1655. Retours. 



13 A. D. 1649. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. p. 395. 

14 Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. K Ibid. 

16 Acta Sanctorum, xvi Martii, citing Boethius. Les 
lie, Dempster, and Utrecht MSS. Leslaeus de Gestis 
Scotorum, p. 17. Camerarius, p. 117. Brev. Aberd. 
Prop. SS. pro temp. hyem. if. 69, 70. Saint Boniface is 
further said to have baptized Nectan king of the Picts, 
and to have first settled at Restennot in Forfarshire. 
He was commemorated by the church of Rome on 16 
March. The authorities cited leave it a matter of 
doubt whether the church which he founded at Rose 
markie was the parish church or the cathedral. 

17 Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, estiv. fol. 7. See 
LISMORE, p. 159. 18 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. viii. fol. 81. 

19 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xix. fol. 75. 

20 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiii. fol. 7. 

K Book of Assumptions. ' a Ibid. 



568 ORIGINES [ROSEMARKIE. 

Hay was reader at Channonrie ; in 1570 the reader was James Buschart ; in 1574 Master John 
Robertsoun was minister at Chanonrie or Eosmarkny, and at Cromartie, and William Hay was 
reader at the Chanonrie or Eosmarkny ; and in 1576 Alexander bishop of Eoss was minister, 
and William Hay reader at Chanonrie and Eosmarkny. 1 

The bishoprick of Eoss was founded by King David I. between the years 1124 and 1128, 
at which period Macbeth its first bishop (Rosmarkensis episcopus) appears in record. 2 The 
bishop's seat was perhaps originally at Eosemarkie, from which the bishoprick continued to be 
occasionally named down to the middle of the thirteenth century, when the original name seems 
to have finally given place to that of bishoprick of Eoss. 3 Among the items of the King's 
revenue accounted for in 12C3 by Laurence le Grant sheriff of Innernes were the King's silver 
(finis) paid by the bishop of Eoss, amounting for that year to 10 marks, and the profits (lucra) 
of the justiciar in Eos, amounting to 4, 10s., exclusive of the bishop's tithe, which was 10s. 4 
In 1329 the abbot of Dunfermline, depositary of the money ordained pro pace (for fulfilling 
the stipulations of the Treaty of Northampton, 1328) accounted to the King's exchequer for 
the sum of 71, Us. Id. received for the bishoprick of Eoss. 5 From that period till near the 
end of the fifteenth century there seems to be almost no recorded notice of the bishoprick, 
except in the case of its successive rulers. 6 John Fraser is alleged to have been appointed 
bishop in 1485 ; the bishop in 1487 was Thomas the founder of the collegiate church of 
Tain ; and in 1499 there is on record a precept of King James IV. for the admission of 
John bishop of Eoss (apparently John Fraser) to the temporality of the bishoprick, ' the aith 
of fidelite ressauit of befor.' 7 In 1507 (1 May) that king granted for a year to Sir Eobert 
Fresale dean of Eoss, Alexander Fresale, and James Makysoun, the executors of the deceased 
John bishop of Eoss, the temporality of the lands and possessions of the bishoprick, with power 
to sublet and to hold courts, with all other liberties. 8 In the same year (17 August) he granted 
a precept of admission to the temporality of the bishoprick in favour of Master Eobert Cokburn. 9 
In 151G King James V. granted a letter of protection to Eobert bishop of Eoss, ' quhilk passis 
in the Kingis ambassiate and seruice to the King of France and vthir princes in the parts beyond 
sey,' and to 33 persons his kinsmen, friends, and servants the letter to be valid for 6 months, 
or for 15 days after the return of the ambassador, who carried with him two letters 'of credence' 
written in French and sealed with the privy seal of Scotland. 10 In 1524 (16 September) the 
same king granted a precept of admission to the temporality of the bishoprick in favour of 
James bishop of Eoss. 11 In 1539 (23 June) he granted a similar precept in favour of Eobert 
bishop of Ross. 1 '-' Between the years 1561 and 1566 the following rental of the bishoprick was 

1 Register of Ministers. Book of Assignations. See Keith's Bishops. 

2 Keith's Bishops. Chalmers, vol. i. p. 678. Acta < Ibid. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. x. no. 109. Reg. Sec. 
1'arl. Scot., vol. i. p. 46*. Regist. (le DuntVrmolyn, p. 4. Sig., vol. i. fol. 127. 

3 Chronica de Mailros, pp. 78, 102, 113, 114, 191. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 113. 
Regist. Morav., pp. 4, 19, 63, 64, 81, 82, 122, 133, 140, Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 121. 
282, 332, 333. Keith's Bishops. ' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. fol. 34. 

4 Compota Camerar., vol. i. p. 16*. " Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. vii. fol. 93. 

5 Ibid., p. 58. 12 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiii. fol. 10. 



ROSEMABKIE.] PAEOCHIALES. 569 

given up to the collector of thirds by Henry Sinclair the bishop ' The rentall cf the bischoprik 
of Eos as it payis now salwo iusto calculo sua far as I can gett witt presentlie. In primis the 
Witsounclay and Martymes tearmis maillis of the landis of the mairdomis of Allane, Ardmanoch, 
Fyrndonald, Nyg, Ardrosser, and vthiris landis perteining to the said bischoprik of Ross, yeirlie 
extendis to the sowme of iiii c Ixii li. iiii s. ii d. Fearmis of the temporalitie thairof, xx ch. viii bs. 
victuall ; custum aittis, vii ch. iiii bs. ; custum mairtis, xxxix mairtis ii quarteris ; custum mut- 
toun, vii xx ; custum caponis, x dossone ; custum pultrie, Ivii. do. ; custum kyddis, vi xx xiiii, and 
with ilk kyd 30 aggis paying thairfor iiii d. ; and in salmond tua or thrie last, and sum yeiris 
not sa many, quhairof is to be deducit salt, tries, and vthir expenss, quhilk the thrid pairt of 
the fishe beis gottin will not outred yeirlie for commoun and sum yeiris not tua last, and 
sua vncertan quhilis lesse quhilis mair. Item ane pairt of the teindis of the paroshinis of 
Kilmowir and Kilernane yeirlie riddin quhylis les quhylis mair estimat to v ch. vii bs. comounly. 
Item the parosh kirk of Tarbat xxxiii ch. i pt., and in tcind silver xxvi li. viii s., and xl muttoun. 
Item in the parochc kirk of Nig xix ch. v bs. victuall, and in teind silver xv li. ix s., xxix 
mvtoun. The sowmes of money and victuall giwin out of the bishoprik of Eos in ordinar now 
yeirlie ; Item to the lordis of the coledge of iustice xvi li. xvi s. ; Item to the chalmerland in 
fie xl lib. ; Item to the gantar men of Nyg and Terbat xviii bs. victuall and ten pundis money ; 
Item to the chaplane of Allane xii bs. victuall ; Item to the fischar bottis of Eosmarkin ii bs. 
ii fir. victuall ; Item to the salmond fischaris of the Nes of the Channonrie xix bs. victual and 
iiii lib. ; Item to the kenar of the Nes xii bs. victuall and ten pund of money ; Item for the 
officiaris fies x lib. ; Item to the curatis of Nyg and Terbat xl li. ; Item to the kenar of Kincairne 
iiii bs. victuall and xl s. mony ; Item to the vicar of chore in the Channonry xx li. ; Item to 
the prechar of the kirkis of Nyg and Terbat in the yeir 1 li. ; Item for the expenss and fies of 
men to keepe the houss and place of the Chanounrie quhen I am furth of it in the cessioun or 
wthirwayis in the Queinis Grace service, quhilk lyis in ane far Heland cuntrie and ellis stollin 
this tyme twa yeir fra my servandis be brokin men as is notarlie knawin, quha withheld it fra 
me nyne monthis or thairby to my great skaith, and opprest nocht allanerlie the landis perteining 
to that kirk bot sindrie vtheris of the Quenis Grace tennentis and vtheris perteining to vther 
landit men of the cuntrie thairabout, quhairthrow it is force to me to haif ane guid company 
of men in my absence in the said place, lykas I haif now presentlie in the samin, quhairof the 
expenss extendis as efter followis Item of victuall xii ch. Item xx mairtis Item of mut 
toun Ixxx Item of pultrie xx dussoun Item for sleshia and vtheris necessaris and the saidis 
menis fies i c lib. ; quhilk is to be considderit, for on force I am constraint to caus keepe that 
place as said is, and wtherwayis, gif broken men mycht haue it, it sould not only stop me to be 
anserit of my leiving in thai pairtis, bot also be ane instrument to truble the cuntrie thairabout. 
Sic subscribitur, Hen. Eossen.' 1 In 1565 Queen Mary granted for life to her servitor ' Seinzeoure 
Johnne Francisco de Busso, knycht of the ordoure of Sanct James of Spada, and ane of hir 
Hienes maister of houshaldis,' a yearly pension of 400 Scots out of the fruits of the bishoprick 

1 Book of Assumptions. 
VOL. II. 4 C 



570 ORIGINES [ROSEMARKIE. 

of Ross and its patrimony. 1 In 1567, for the good service done to her deceased mother and 
to herself by the same ' Seinzeoure Francisco,' she confirmed the grant. 2 In 1568 King James 
VI. confirmed to Gilbert Dowglas the brother german of Frances Dowglas of Borg a grant for 
life made to him (3 February 1565) of a yearly pension of 200 Scots out of the fruits of the 
bishoprick of Eos, to be paid ' be the bischop or intrantis quhilkis suld liappin than to be prouidit 
thairto be oure Souerane Lordis moder or be ony vthiris quhatsumeuir' the grant and the 
confirmation to be valid ' nochtwithstanding the proces of forfaltour led aganis Johnne now 
bischop of Eos for certane crymes of tressoun and lesemaiestie committit be him.' 3 In 1569 
the same king confirmed to ' Seigneoure Francisco de Busso' the grant of 1565 and the con 
firmation of 15G7. 4 In 1570 (15 November), for the good service done by Alexander Suthirland 
during the regency of James Earl of Murray and afterwards, the King (James VI.) granted to 
Alexander for life a yearly pension of 80 bolls of victual out of two-thirds of the bishoprick of 
Eoss, then vacant by the forfeiture of Bishop John for treason and lesemajesty and, as security 
for payment he granted him the teind victuals of certain lands in the parish of Tarbert extending 
yearly to 80 bolls of victual, ' without prejudice of the said Alexanderis executioun vpoun the 
reddiest vthir fruitis of the said bischoprik in cais he be not thankfullie ansucrit of the saidis 
t'ruitis assignit.' 5 In the same year (21 December) the same king, for the good service done to 
his ' guidschir and regent' by Robert Leslie of Arthourscir, granted to him for life a yearly 
pension of 103, lls. 4d. Scots, together with 300 ' laidis of peittis' out of the fruits of the 
bishoprick of Eos, and, as security, the dues of the lands of Arthourscir and others belonging 
to the bishoprick. 6 In 1571 the same king granted in heritage to Henrie Lord Methuen the 
escheat of all the goods and dues of the bishoprick, its lands and its churches, remaining due 
since the forfeiture of John bishop of Ros for treason and lesemajesty. 7 In 1572 (6 January) he 
confirmed his grant of 1570 to Robert Leslie of Arthourseir. 8 In the same year (20 February), 
on the narrative that the presentation of a bishop to the see of Ross after the forfeiture of 
Bishop John, and certain other privileges, had been promised by the regents Murray and Lennox 
to Donald Gormsoun of Sky, King James VI. after the decease of both regents granted in lieu 
a yearly pension of 1000 marks Scots out of the fruits of bishoprick of Abii-dene forfeited by 
Bishop William. 9 In 1578 the same king granted in heritage to Henrie Lord Methuen the 
temporality of the bishoprick of Ros, and the castle, house, and place of Channonrie, with 
all pertinents, vacant by the decease of Alexander bishop of Eos, until a bishop should be 
appointed. 10 In 1579, for the good service done to him by Alexander Ruthven the brother 
gorman of his treasurer William Lord Ruthven, King James granted to Alexander for life a 
yearly pension of 200 Scots out of the fruits of the bishoprick of Ros, resigned by Gilbert 
Douglas the brother german of Frances Douglas of Boirg. 11 In 1585 (19 May) the same king 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxvi. fol. 9. 2 Ibid. : Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. fol. 10. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 24. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 47. 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 46. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. fol. 50. See SLEAT, p. 342. 

5 Rfg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 37. See TARBAT, pp. "> Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 88. 

438,439. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 47. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvi. fol. 52. See above. 



ROSEMARKIE.] PAEOCHIALES. 571 

granted in heritage to Henrie Lord Methuen, the son and apparent heir of the deceased lord 
of that name, the temporality of the bishoprick of Boss, and the castle, house, and place of 
the Channonrie, with the lands, mills, fishings, woods, and all dues belonging to it, in the King's 
hands by the decease of Alexander bishop of Ross, and formerly granted by the King to the 
deceased lord from the death of the bishop till another should be appointed. 1 In the same 
year (28 September) the same king granted for life to Eoger Aschtoun for his good service a 
yearly pension of 400 marks out of the fruits of two-thirds of the bishoprick of Ross or any 
part of it, in the King's hands by the decease of ' Adam and John Bussois,' and to be paid to 
him even after a bishop should be appointed. 2 In 1586 (1 February) the King granted for 
life to Andrew Wod his comptroller a yearly pension of 200 Scots out of two-thirds of the 
bishopiek of Ross, beginning in 1585 and for payment assigned to him 10 chalders of bear 
at 20 per chalder out of the fruits of the parish of Tarbert. 3 In the same year and on the 
same day he granted for life to John Fentoun his comptroller's clerk a yearly pension of 200 
marks Scots from two-thirds of the same bishoprick, to begin in 15S5 and assigned to 
him for payment 6 chalders 10 bolls of bear out of the fruits of the same parish.* In the 
same year (4 March) he granted for life to William Keith the master of his wardrobe a yearlv 
pension of 10 chalders of victual out of two-thirds of the same bishoprick, to begin in the 
year 1585. 5 

In the year 1226 a controversy between Robert bishop of Ross and John Byseth about the 
patronage of the church of Kyntalargy was settled as follows The bishop with the consent 
of the chapter of Rosmarkyn and his other clergy of Ros quitclaimed to John Byseth and his 
heirs for their homage his right of patronage, if any ; and John Byseth and his heirs quitclaimed 
to the bishop whatever right they had to the kirkland of the said church ; and John Biseth 
besides, for the purpose of settling the controversy and as an atonement for his own sins (pro 
redemptions peccatorum suorwn) contributed 15 marks of silver to the fabrick of the church of 
Saint Peter of Rosmarkyn, and a stone of wax yearly from himself and his heirs to the light 
upon the altar of that church ; and the bishop and dean and canons gave John and his heirs 
an interest in the orisons (omnium orationum suffragiis) which should be perpetually presented 
in praise of the Lord in that church ; and, in order to secure unbroken the future observation 
of the agreement, there were appended to it the seals of both parties and the seal of the chapter 
of Rosmarkyn. 6 In 1227, on the settlement of a dispute between the bishops of Moray and 
Ross about the churches of Kyntalargyn and Ardrosser, the bishop of Ross gave up the stone 
of wax thus acquired for the use of the cathedral church of Elgyu. 7 In 1338 Sir Andrew de 
Moravia, lord of Bothwell and Avoch, died in Ross and was buried in the ' kyrk cathedrale of 
Rosmarkyne.' 8 In 1420 (16 August), in the presence of John bishop of Ross and others, in 
the ' kyrkeyharde of the chanounry of Rosmarkyng,' William the Grame, the son and heir of the 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Hi. ff. 125, 126. 5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. fol. 124. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. fol. 48. 6 Regist. Moravicnse, pp. 332, 333. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. lol. 97. See TARBAT, p. 434. ' Ibid., pp. 81, 82. See ARDERSIER,/WS(. 

1 Ibid. 8 Wyntounis Cronikle. Reg. Morav., p. xxxviii. 



572 OEIGINES [ROSEMARKIE. 

deceased Henry the Grame, resigned the lands of the barony of Kerdale in Inverness to his 
overlord Thomas Earl of Moray. 1 In 1494 or 1495 Hugh Eos of Kilrawok, John Eos his son, 
John Urquhard, Gillepatrik Makfleger, Donald Makcvne, John Eos in Financefeild, William Eos, 
Cristus Makmullmory, John Huchonsoun, Duugal Clerk, John Eoy Makhuchone, and Ewin 
Makcvne, slew within the cemetery of the cathedral church of Eoss Alexander Nobill, John 
Nobill, William Gawane (Galkane, or Gollan), and a chaplain named Sir Maurice. 2 For this 
crime Hugh Eos appears to have been tried before the circuit court at Inverness, and to have 
compounded for the sum of 42 to the King, for payment of which Sir Alexander Gordoun 
of Migmar, Henry Chene of Essilmont, and John the Eoss of Auchinlosk, became his sure 
ties. 3 In 1495 (8 February) Henry abbot of Cambuskenneth, treasurer to King James IV. 
granted to those parties a discharge for that sum, which the king had forgiven to Hugh 
Boss. 4 In 1498 (26 January) the King granted to Hugh Eoss and the other eleven who were 
art and part in the murder a remission for the same, and for all crimes with which they 
might be chargeable on that occasion, on condition that they should make amends to the 
parents and friends of the parties slain. 5 In 1543 Master Mungo Monypenny archdeacon of 
Eoss, and Sir Thomas Haisty a monk of Bewlie, found surety for their appearance in court to 
answer for being art and part in the oppression done to Master Gawin Dunbar treasurer of Eoss 
by their coming upon him in company with Ilobert bishop of Eoss and his accomplices within 
the cathedral church, laying hands upon him, and cruelly wounding him to the effusion of his 
blood. 6 In 1546 a charter by Master John Monro, chaplain of Balkny, is given at the cathedral 
church, with consent of the Queen, the Earl of Aran, and the same Master Mungo or Kentigern 
dean and vicar-general of Eoss. 7 In 1572 King James VI. granted in heritage to his treasurer 
William Lord Euthuen ' the haill leid quhairwith the cathedrall kirk of Eos wes theikit, alsweill 
principal kirk as queir and ills thairof, ellis tyrvit, tane of, and disponit vpoun as to be intro- 
mettit with and in place vnhandillit,' formerly belonging to the bishop and canons, and now 
in the King's hands, ' throw being of the said cathedrall kirk na paroch kirk, bot ane monasterie 
to sustene ydill belleis,' and through the forfeiture of the bishop for treason and lesemajesty 
with power to ' intromet and tak vp the saidis haill leid theikit vpoun the said cathedrall kirk 
queir and ylis thairof, ellis tirvit, tane of, and disponit vpoun, as alsua as yit restand vnintro- 
inettit with,' and to sell or otherwise dispose of it at his pleasure. 8 Bishop Leslie about the 
year 1578 says that not far from Eosmarky is situated the cathedral church of Eoss, named 
not from the town but from the province. 9 In 1584 King James VI. confirmed a charter by 
Alexander bishop of Eoss, granting in heritage to William Eobcrtsoun indweller in the canonry 
of Eoss a piece of land or particate of the cemetery of the cathedral church, partly built and 
partly waste, extending to the space of 10G feet or 8 ' cupill bigging' in length, reckoning 12 

! Reg. Morav., pp. 475, 470. '> Ibid. Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. iv. fol. 70. 

2 Kilravock Charters. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iv. fol. 70. 6 Pitcairn's Crim. Trials, vol. i. p. 328. 
The Family of Kilravock, pp. 64, 65, 163, 164. 1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 566. 

3 Kilravock Charters. * Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. fol. 106. 
' Il>id. 9 De Gestis Scotorum, p. 17. 



ROSEMARKIE.] PAROCHIALES. 573 

feet as one ' cuppill bigging,' and to the space of 5 ells in breadth ; lying before the manse of 
the archdeacon on the east side of the same between the south part or gable of the house of 
John Irwyng of Kynnok, then belonging in heritage to him and Margaret Cumyng his wife, 
and formerly belonging in feuferme to Robert Grahame archdeacon of Ross, situated within the 
cemetery, on the north, and the residuum of the cemetery on the south, and extending from the 
King's common road on the east as far as the residuum of the cemetery on the east (west?). 1 
In 1585 the same king confirmed a charter by the same bishop, granting to John Robertsoun 
treasurer of Ross and his heirs a piece of the ground of the cemetery, partly built and partly 
waste, extending to the space of 155 feet or 13 ' cuppill bigging' in length, counting 12 feet 
as one ' cuppill bigging,' and to the space of 5 ells in breadth. 2 In 1649 the inhabitants of the 
Chanonrie of Ross represented to parliament that the cathedral church had lain waste and 
destitute of a particular ministry ever since the Reformation, and prayed that it should be 
declared a parish church, the stipend to be provided from the bishop's rents and the free teinds 
of the parish of Chanrie. 3 The parliament therefore recommended to the commissioners for the 
plantation of kirks the plantation of the kirk of Chanrie to be considered among their first acts. 4 
A charter of King Alexander II., dated 5 July 1224, is addressed to the bishop of Catanes, 
the abbot of Kynlos, and the dean of Rosmarkyn. 5 The last named person was probably Henry 
dean of Ross or of Rosmarkyn and vicar of Dunbathlach (in Moray), who appears in record in 
the years 1224 (19 July), 1226, and 1227. 6 In 1258 and 1280 the dean of Ross appears in 
record without being named. 7 Between 1338 and 1350 a charter of Muriel of Roys, the widow 
of Sir William of Roys lord of Kylrauoke, is witnessed by Master John of Kynkellee dean of 
Ross. 8 In 1350 and 1368 Master Alexander dean of Ross appears in record. 9 In 1389 Master 
William of Dyngwale was dean of Ross. 10 In 1420 the dean was Sir William Fayrhar, and in 
1451 John Caldor. 11 In 1478 and 1487 various charters are witnessed by Master Martin 
Vaus dean of Ross. 12 In 1507 and 1514 appears in record Sir Robert Fresale dean of 
Ross, who was official in 1514, and is said to have died in 1523. 18 In 1544 Sir Paul Fresall 
chaplain was dean of Ross. 14 He had four sons, Donald, Robert, William, and John, who in 
that year were legitimised by Queen Mary ; and Sir Paul's death is recorded to have taken 
place in 1545. 15 In 1546, 1547, and between 1561 and 1566, Master Kentigern or Mungo 
Monypenny was dean of Ross, and in the first two of those years vicar general. 16 In 1572 King 
James VI. granted in heritage to Robert Leslie of Arthourseir the escheat of the goods that 
belonged to Master Mungo, then rebel and at the horn for non-payment of the third of his 



1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 62. " Ibid., p. 475. Balnagown Charters. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. lii. fol. 61. 12 Regist. de Aberbrothoc, vol. ii. no. 201. Reg. Ma;:. 

3 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. p. 395. Sig., lib. x. no. 109. 

4 Ibid. It does not appear that this transaction pro- 13 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 113. Beauly Charters. 
duced the desired result. Calendar of Fearn. 

5 Regist. Moraviense, p. 19. u Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxix. no. 207. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

6 Ibid., pp. 76-78, 82, 333. 7 Ibid., pp. 133, 140. vol. xviii. fol. 34. 15 Ibid. Calendar of Fearn. 
s Kilravock Charters. 9 Balnagown Charters. 16 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 566. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

lu Regist. Moraviense, p. 354. vol. xxi. fol. 52 ; vol. xxxi. fol. 97. 



574 ORIGINES [ROSEMABKIE. 

deanery for the year 1567 to Patrick Dauidsoun ' Ros Herauld,' collector of the thirds of the 
benefices within the bounds of Eos, Sutherland, and Caitnes. 1 In 1576 the same king presented 
Alexander Vrquhart to the deanery of Eos, then vacant by the demission of Master Mungo 
Monypenny. 2 In 1578 the same Alexander dean of Eos granted for life to Walter Vrquhart 
Sheriff of Cromartie, and for life to his nearest heir, a yearly pension out of the quarter teinds 
of the parish of Cromartie belonging to the deanery. 3 In 1583 he presented Hector Monro, 
the son of Robert Monro of Foulis, to the deanery, vacant by the deposition of Alexander 
Vrquhart, or by his abiding at the horn for more than a year and a day, or by his demission 
from whatever other cause.* In 1584 (22 August) he confirmed two charters One by the 
deceased Quiutigeru Monypenny dean and vicar general of Ross, granting in heritage to Helen 
Tailzeour, the relict of the deceased Gilbert Dick, the dean's croft lying within the bounds of 
the canonry of Ross between the croft of the rector of Alnes on the east and the croft of 
the rector of Eoschene on the west, and between the lands, manse, or garden of the dean on 
the north, and the common pasture of the Deanis Pot on the south ; and another by dean 
Alexander Vrquhart, granting in heritage to Walter Vrquhart sheriff' of Cromartie his manse 
and garden lying between his croft which belonged to Donald Vrquhart on the south, the 
residuum of his manse occupied by William Hay on the east, the King's common road on the 
north, and the manse of the rector of Eoskene on the west, in the earldom and canonry of 
Ross. 5 In 1585 the same king confirmed dean Alexander's grant of the quarter teinds of 
Cromartie made to the sheriff in 1578. 6 In 1607 Thomas Urquhart of Cromertie was served 
heir to his grandfather Walter sheriff of Cromertie in the manse of the deanery of Ross in the 
canonry with the croft, and a piece or rood of land of the same manse with a stone house built 
on it, of the extent of 10s. 4d. feuferme. 7 In 1661, on a petition from Master Patrick Durhaine 
late minister of Ardnaseir, who had been appointed for life to the deanery of Ross, the parliament 
ordered the heritors and others to pay to him 40 bolls of teind victual with certain customs and 
silver duty, payable to him as dean out of the teinds of Rosemarkie, which for three years 
they had paid to the minister of Cromertie. 8 

In 1255 appears in record Master R. of Eglinton chanter of Eoss. 9 In the year 1281 a 
charter of William Earl of Ros is witnessed by Master Ada of Derlingtun precentor of Eos. 10 
Between 1350 and 1372 Sir Isaac Olivar precentor of Ross appears in record. 11 In 1451 the 
precentor was Thomas Fauconer. 12 In 1505, 1513, and 1516 Sir John Calder chanter of Ross 
appears in record, and in 1520 he was dead. 13 In 1532 and 1541 the chanter was Sir Walter 
Stewart, and between 1561 and 1566 Master John Cairncroce. 1 * 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. fol. 42. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. vii. p. 106. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig , vol. xliii. fol. 109. Beauly Charters. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. lii. fol. 105. See CKOMARTV, '" Regist. Moraviense, p. 282. 

p. 558. " Balnagown Charters. a Hurt. 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 116. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 21; vol. v. fol. 46. 

5 Reg Sec. Sig., vol. li. ff. 14, 40. Beauly Charters. Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. xx. no. 86. 

6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. lii. fol. 105. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 04. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. 

7 Retours. ixvii. no. 109. Book of Assumptions. 



ROSEMAKKIE.] PAROCHIALES. 575 

Of the chancellors of Ross appear in record, in 1255 Sir R., in 1333 William of Lindors, 
and in 1451 and 1456 Master Thomas of Lochmalony or Loucholony. 1 In 1520 King James 
V. granted to Duncan Chalmer chancellor of Ros all the property that belonged to William 
Wedman and James Crag (the latter residing in Litill Ferry), which was escheat to the 
King ' throw thare remaning and biding at hame fra our Souerane Lordis oist and army quhilk 
passit with his derest brothir and counsalour James Erie of Murray in Cathnes for invading 
and perseving of his rebellis being tharin and putting of gud reule in thai partis.' 2 The same 
person, afterwards Master Duncan, and in 1553 official of Ross, appears in record in 1543, 
1549, 1553, and 1556. 3 At the Reformation he was still chancellor or ' vsufructuare,' and 
Master David Chalmer was titular. 4 In 1508 King James VI. granted in heritage to Master 
James Kirkcaldy, the brother german of Sir William Kirkcaldy of Grange, the escheat of all 
the goods and of the fruits of all the benefices that belonged to Master David Chalmer, 
especially the provostry of Creichtoun and the chancellary of Ros, forfeited by him as ' fugi 
tive fra the law, at the home, or in will' for art and part in the battle of Langsyid, 
and for art and part in the slaughter of James Balany in Prestoun, James Douglas ' suddart,' 
and William Purves servitor to Alexander Hume of Manderstoun, at the same place. 5 Master 
Duncan Chalmer died in 1571, and in that year (1 July) King James VI. presented Master 
George Monro to the chancellary of Rois, vacant by the decease of Master Duncan, or by the 
forfeiture of his pretended successor Master David Chalmer for treason and lesemajesty. 6 In 
the same year (4 July) the King granted to Robert Monro of Foulis the escheat of all the 
goods that belonged to the deceased Master Duncan, and to his pretended successor Master 
David, who was then rebel and at the horn for non-payment of the third of his benefice to 
the collectors. 7 In 1572 the King confirmed the grant of the chancellary to Master George 
Monro. 8 In 1585 he confirmed a charter by Master George Monro chancellor of Ross, granting, 
with consent of Alexander bishop of Ross, the dean, and the canons, to Master John Robert- 
soun treasurer of Ross and Elizabeth Baillie his wife, and their heirs, with remainder to John's 
heirs whomsoever, the chancellor's manse with the houses and buildings both built and to be 
built, and the garden and croft of the same lying contiguously, in the canonry of Ross. 9 In 
1592 the same king granted to Master David Chalmer of Ormound the glebes and manses of 
the chancellary of Ros. 10 In 1649 Master George Monro, minister of the word of God at the 
church of Rosmarkie, was served heir to his father Master George, minister at Suddie, in 
the manse, house, and croft of the same, which of old belonged to the chancellor of Ross within 
the canonry and bishoprick of the same, of the extent of 46s. 8d. feuferme ; and in a piece or 
perticate of land of the garden or cemetery of the cathedral church of Ross, 72 feet long by 
5 ells wide, in the same canonry, of the extent of 6 shillings feuferme. 11 

1 Beauly Charters. Balnagown Charters. Misc. of 5 Reg. Sec. Sip;., vol. xxxvii. fol. 72. 

Bannatyne Club, vol. iii. 6 Calendar of Fearn. Eeg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 91 . 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. viii. fol. 231. 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 101. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. iin. 419, 440; lib. x_\xi. nn. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 91. 
205, 583. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Hi. fol. 61. 

4 Book of Assumptions. 10 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. iii. p. 601. " Retours. 



576 OBIGINES [BOSEMARKIE. 

In 1227 an agreement respecting the churches of Kyntalargyn and Ardrosser, made at 
Kenedor in Moray between the bishops of Moray and Boss, was subscribed among others by 
William the treasurer of Kosmarkyn. 1 In 1451 a transumpt of certain charters made in the 
chapel of Saint Nicolas in the cathedral church of Koss is witnessed by Thomas Tulloch 
treasurer. 2 In 1518 is recorded the death of Thomas Heriot treasurer of Ross. 3 In 1543 
the treasurer was Master Gawin Dunbar, the subject of an affray in the cathedral church above 
described. 4 Master Gavin died in 154C, and in that year (13 September) Queen Mary presented 
Master John Hammiltoun of Mylburne to the treasurership, vacant by Master Gauin's decease. 5 
The same Master John appears as treasurer in 1547, and was dead in 1548, in which year (22 
April) Queen Mary presented John Robesoun to the treasurership, vacant by the decease of the 
former. 6 Master John Robertsoun was treasurer at the Reformation, when the treasurership was 
leased to Matthew Hamiltoun of Mylneburne. 7 In 1584 King James VI. confirmed a charter 
by the same Master John, granting in heritage to Donald Reid the treasurer's croft in the canonry 
lying between the croft and garden of the chancellor of Ross on the west, and the croft of the 
chanter on the east, and between the treasurer's principal dwelling on the south and the hill 
called Craiglaw on the north and also a piece of the treasurer's manse on the east side 
extending to 20 ells in breadth and destroyed to the foundation, lying between his croft on 
the north and the King's common road on the south, and between the manse of the precentor 
of Ross on the east and the residuum of the treasurer's manse on the east (west?) 8 In 1585 
the same king confirmed a charter by the same treasurer, granting in heritage to Thomas 
Orok in the canonry of Ross and Bessy Gardin his wife a piece of the manse of the treasury 
lying in the canonry and extending in length and breadth respectively to 20 ells, between 
the King's common road on the south, the principal manse of the treasury on the north, the 
part of the manse formerly let to Donald Reid on the east, and the entrance to the manse 
on the west. 9 In 1586 the same king confirmed two charters by the same Master John 
llobertsoun treasurer of Ross 1. Granting in heritage to Archibald Hammiltoun dwelling 
in Linlithgow a part of the manse of the treasury within the canonry, lying between the 
croft of the treasury occupied by William Robertsoun in the canonry towards the north, 
another part of the said manse occupied by Robert Leslie on the east, the manse of the chan 
cellor on the west, and another piece of the manse of the treasury let to Thomas Robertsoun 
in the canonry on the south ; and 2. Granting in liferent to Robert Leslie in the canonry 
and Margaret Robertsoun his wife, and in heritage to John Leslie their son, with remainder 
to the other lawful heirs of Robert and Margaret and their heirs, and to John Robertsoun 
the brother of Margaret and his heirs whomsoever, a part of the land of the treasury of Ross 
on the east side of the same extending to 20 ells, lying in the canonry between the precentor's 
manse on the east and the residuum of the treasury manse on the west, and extending in 

; Kcgist. Morav., p. 82. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxL ff. 35, 86. 

2 Balnagown Charters. ' Book of Assumptions. Book of Assignations. 

3 Calendar of Fearn. 4 See p. 572. 8 Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 62. 

> Calendar of Fearn. Hog. Sec. Sig., vol. xx. fol. 46. 9 Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. Hi. fol. 106. 



ROSEMABKIE.] PAROCHIALES. 577 

length from the King's common road on the south to the croft of William Eobertsoun in the 
canonry on the north. 1 

In 1487 the foundation charter of the collegiate church of Tain was witnessed among others 
by Thomas Eos subdean of Ross. 2 In 1494 during the vacancy of the see King James IV. 
presented Master James Forster to the subdeanery. 3 In the same year (3 July) that kin? 
prosecuted Master John Maitland for contempt of his authority and violation of the acts of 
parliament in having passed to the court of Rome without the King's license, and in havino- 
obtained the subdeanery of Ross and published certain bulls contrary to the royal prero 
gative, by which acts he had incurred the penalties of proscription and banishment and also 
for disturbing Master James Forster in his possession of the subdeanery. 4 Master John pro 
tested against the auditors, but produced no exculpatory evidence ; and the Lords of Council 
ordained that meantime Master James Forster should enjoy the benefice, and assigned to him 
and to the King's advocates the eighth day of August following to prove that Master John 
Maitland had acted contrary to statute and in what manner. 5 In the year 1549 Pope Paul III., 
with the consent of Master John Thorntoun subdean of Ros and Master James Thorntoun parson 
of Ancrum, granted for life to Master Henry Thorntoun a yearly pension of 100 Scots out of 
the fruits of the subdeanery, and of a like sum out of those of the parsonage of Ancrum. 6 
Between 1561 and 1566 Master James Thorntoun was subdean of Ros. 7 In 1569 (14 
November) Master John Thorntoun was dead, and King James VI. confirmed the grant of 1549. 8 
In 1578 that king presented William Makquene parson of Assent to the subdeanery of Ros, 
vacant by the decease of Master James Thorntoun. 9 In 1583 he confirmed a grant in heritage 
by the same William, to William Barbour in the canonry, of his manse of the subdeanery with 
all its pendicles, pertinents, houses, gardens, and buildings, and the kiln (vstrina) and its croft 
lying contiguous to the manse, in the canonry of Ross. 10 

In 1296 John of Hedlam subchanter of the church of Ros swore fealty to King Edward I. 11 
In 1514 a mandate of Robert Fresel dean and official of Ross is witnessed by Anselm Robert- 
soun (Roberti) the subchanter. 12 In 1541 and between 1561 and 1566 Master David Haliburtoun 
was subchanter of Ross. 13 In 1573 King James VI. presented Donald Adamesoun minister at 
Vrray to the parsonage of Vrray or subchantry of Ross, vacant by the deprivation or forfeiture 
of Master David Halyburtoun. 1 * In 1574 that king confirmed a charter by Master David 
Halyburtoun, provost of the collegiate church of Methuen and subchanter of the cathedral 
church of Ross, granting with the consent of the bishop, dean, vicar general, and canons, to 
Donald Vrquhart in Ferrietoun and his heirs the manse with the houses, buildings, gardens, 
tofts, and crofts, belonging to the subchantry, then occupied by John Frissell and John Wilsoun, 
in the city of the canonry of Ross, between the chanter's manse on the west, the Watergate 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fol. 33. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 1. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. x. no. 109. 10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 68. 

3 Acta Dom. Cone., p. 351. Ibid. > Ibid. Ragman Rolls, p. 144. 12 Beauly Charters. 

Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 90. 13 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvii. no. 159. Book of As- 

7 Book of Assumptions. sumptions. 

s Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 90. " Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 107. 

VOL. II. 4 D 



578 OEIGINES [HOSEMARKIE. 

(aqualem mam) on the east, the common street on the south, and the hill commonly called 
Plotokhill on the north. 1 In 1604 John Urquhart was served heir male of entail and provision 
to his father Walter Urquhart sheriff of Cromartie in a croft of land in the canonry of Ross 
called the subchanter's croft, of the extent of 6s. 8d., and a rood of land in the canonry belong 
ing to the subchanter, 40 ells in length and 30 in breadth, of the extent of 3s. 4d.' 2 In 1607 
Thomas Urquhart of Cromertie was served heir to his grandfather Walter Urquhart sheriff of 
Cromertie in the manse of the subchanter and its croft, of the extent of 3 feuferme. 3 

Robert archdeacon and canon of Ross appears in record in 1226 and 1227, and in the latter 
year was present at Kenedor in Moray at the settlement of a dispute between the bishops of 
Moray and Ross. 4 Between 1362 and 1372 charters are witnessed by Thomas of Urchard arch 
deacon of Ross. 5 In 1451 the archdeacon of Ross was Andrew of Monro, who was also commis 
sioner of the bishop and auditor of consistorial cases. 6 In 1484 Sir David Lichtone archdeacon 
of Ross and clerk of the King's treasury was elected abbot of Arbroath. 7 In 1487 the archdeacon 
was Richard Murhed, one of the witnesses to the foundation charter of the collegiate church of 
Tain. 8 In 1510 King James IV. granted a letter of protection to Master Robert Elphinstoun 
archdeacon of Ross. 9 In 1543 the archdeacon was Master Mungo Monypenny, afterwards 
dean. 10 Between 1561 and 1566 the archdeacon of Ross was Master Duncan (Donald ?) Eraser. 11 
In 1572 Master Donald Fraser archdeacon of Ross was slain at Awfurd. 12 In 1573 King James 
VI. presented Robert Grahame to the archdeaconry, vacant by the decease of Master Donald 
Fraser. 13 In 1576 that king confirmed a charter by William Sinclare rector of Olrik, canon of 
Cathanes, and commissioner and vicegerent of the deceased Henry bishop of Ross, granting to 
the deceased Master Donald Fraser archdeacon of Ross and his nearest heirs, with remainder 
to his heirs whomsoever, the lands and town of Mureheid, with their pertinents except the lands 
of Craigheid, in the diocese of Ross with the clause inserted by the bishop at the foot of the 
charter, confirming it under his seal and subscription. 14 In 1581 the same king confirmed a 
charter by Robert Grahamo archdeacon of Ross, granting to William Stewart in the canonry 
of Ross and Besset Irving his wife, and to their heirs born between them, with remainder to the 
heirs of William, his portion of the manse of the archdeaconry within the canonry, with the 
houses, buildings, gardens, and others, constructed or to be constructed by them. 15 In 1582 
King James confirmed a charter by Master Donald Fraser archdeacon of Ross, granting to 
Donald Reid chaplain in the cathedral church for life, and to Alexander Reid his natural son, 
and his heirs male, with remainder to John Reid the brother german of Alexander and to his 
heirs male, and to the heirs male whomsoever of Donald Reid, that piece of land of his manse 

1 Keg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 145. " Book of Assumptions. 

"- Retours. 3 lya. 12 Calendar of Fearn. The death of the archdeacon 

4 Regist. Moraviense, pp. 82, 333. seems to have taken place in an engagement at Tulli- 

5 Balnagown Charters. 6 Ibid. angus between the Gordons and Forbeses, in which the 
7 Regist. de Aberbrothoc, vol. ii. no. 240. former were victorious. See Buch. Hist., lib. xx. c. 64. 
" Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. x. no. 109. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xli. fol. 107. 

a Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iv. fol. 71. '* Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xliii. fol. 109. 

10 Pitcairn's Crim. Trials, vol. i. p. 328*. See p. 572. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 118. 



ROSEMAKKIE.] PAKOCHIALES. 579 

in the canonry between the King's common road towards the east, the feu lands (terras 
feudatarias) of Thomas Legat towards the west, the feu lands of William Robertsoun towards 
the south, and the feu lands of Thomas Legat towards the north, and then occupied by Donald 
Reid. 1 In 1583 the same king confirmed two charters by the same archdeacon 1. Granting 
in heritage to William Robertsoun, dwelling in the canonry and college of Ross, and to Eufame 
Basok his wife, a piece of the lands of the manse of the archdeaconry in the canonry occupied 
by William, and extending to 65 measured ells in length, namely, from the common road called 
the ' calsay ' on the east to the archdeacon's croft on the west, and 14 ells in breadth, namely, 
from the principal manse of the rector of Kirkmichell on the south to the other side of the 
archdeacon's manse on the north ; and 2. Granting to the same parties in heritage a croft of 
land in the canonry called the archdeacon's croft, occupied by Helen Tailzeour.-' In 1584 the 
same king confirmed another charter by the deceased Master Donald Fraser the archdeacon, 
granting to Thomas Legat and Elisabeth Besek his wife, and to their heirs born between them, 
with remainder to the heirs whomsoever of Thomas, a piece of the land of the archdeacon's 
manse in the canonry, between the King's common road in front on the north, the lands of 
William Robertsoun on the south, the King's common road and the archdeacon's lands occupied 
by Donald Reid on the east, and the archdeacon's lands occupied by James Fraser on the west 
which piece of land was then occupied by Thomas Legat and John Patersoun, or was at 
least in their hands by reason of a lease granted to them for 19 years. 3 In 1585 King 
James confirmed a charter by John Fraser feuar, with the consent of Isobel Marlioun liferenter, 
granting in heritage to his brother german William Fraser the west piece of the manse of the 
archdeaconry, with the houses, gardens, and buildings of the same, lying between the croft of 
the archdeaconry then belonging in heritage to William Robertsoun towards the west, the garden 
of the same William Robertsoun towards the south, a part of the said manse of John Fraser 
towards the east, and the King's common road, commonly called the ' calsay,' on the north.* In 
1627 Kenneth Grant was served heir to his father Robert Grant, burgess of the canonry, in 
the principal stone house of the archdeaconry of Ros with part of the garden of the arch 
deaconry lying in the canonry, of the extent of 7s. and 4d. in augmentation in another part 
of the archdeacon's manse in the canonry, of the extent of 6s. 8d. and 4d. in augmentation 
and in the fifth part of the lands of Bromehill with the tithes, also in the canonry, and of the 
extent of 6. D 

In 1451 Henrv Kynnidy, not designated as a prebendary, was official of the bishoprick. 6 
In 1226 an agreement between Robert bishop of Ross and John Byseth was witnessed by the 
canons of Rosmarkyn. 7 In 1227 a settlement made between the bishops of Moray and Ross 
about the churches of Kyntalargyn and Ardrosser was subscribed by Robert bishop and canon 
of Ross, Robert archdeacon and canon of the church of Ross, Edward Beket canon of Ross, 
Archebald canon of Ross, Maurice canon of Rosmarkyn and parson of Ardrosser, and Peter 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlviii. fol. 123. < Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. lii. fol. 130. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. tbl. 114. ' Retours. 6 Balnagown Charters. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 41. : Regist. Morav., p. 333. See above, p. 571. 



580 ORIGINES [ROSEMARKIE. 

canon both of Moray and of Ross. 1 In the year 1296 Thomas of lar prebendary of the church 
of Ros swore fealty to King Edward I. 2 In 1312 an agreement between Bernard abbot of 
Abirbrothoc and llayner the son of Alan was witnessed among others by Thomas of Salthor 
canon of Ross. 3 Between 1338 and 1357 a charter of Muriel of Roys was witnessed by Master 
Andrew de Bosco canon of Ross. 4 In 1398 Robert M'Chanter (Cantoris) witnessed among 
others a protest by William bishop of Moray against a sentence pronounced on him for not 
giving suit at the sheriff court of Innernys. 5 There appear in record, in 1451 Thomas of 
Dyngvale, in 1514 John Fresell, in 1524 Alexander Dunbar, and in 1546 Sir John Stephen- 
son, canons of Ross. 6 Besides the dignitaries the chapter in later times seems to have included 
the rectors of Kirkmichael, Cullicuddin, Kiltearn, Lumlair, Logie Easter, Roskene, Allies, 
Contin, Avoch, Kilmuir Easter, and Kincardine. 7 

In 1580 King James VI. confirmed a charter by Master Thomas Marioribanks rector of Kirk- 
michell intra ecclesiam cathedralem Rossen. fundat., granting in heritage to John Wilsoun in 
the canonry of Ross a piece of the waste manse (rnansi vasti) belonging to Master Thomas, 
and lying within the bounds of the canonry between the lands of William Barbour towards the 
north, the manse of the rector of Cullycuddin towards the south, the public road on the east, 
and the seashore on the west. 8 In 1585 the same king confirmed a charter by the same Master 
Thomas, rector of Carmichaell within the cathedral church of Ross, granting, with consent of 
the dean and canons during the vacancy of the see, to William Robertsoun dwelling in the 
canonry and Eufame Basak his wife and their heirs, with remainder to William's heirs whom 
soever, a waste piece of ground of the manse of the rectory within the canonry on its north side, 
5 ells or thereby in length, lying between the manse on the south, the manse of the archdeacon 
on the north, the street commonly called the 'calsay' and the common ferry (commune passagiwn) 
on the east, and the high water mark (jluxum maris) on the west. 9 In 1586 the same king 
confirmed a charter by the same rector, granting in heritage to Walter Vrquhart sheriff of 
Cromartie his principal house and manse of Kirkmichall, with its enclosure, garden, and tail, then 
almost destroyed to the foundation, waste, and burned, lying in the canonry of Ross between 
the feu lands (terras feudales) of William Robertsoun, which he held in heritage of the rector, 
towards the north, the feu lands of William Barboure towards the south, the common road on 
one side (towards the east?), and the seashore on the west for the restoration, construction, 
and repair of the same house and manso, and of its enclosure, garden, and ditches. 10 

In 1580 King James VI. confirmed a charter of Master John Sandilandis rector of Kilterne, 
granting to Gavin Reid carpenter in Innernes the houses of the manse of Kilterne, with the 
garden and pertinents, then occupied by Thomas Smyth. 11 In 1583 he confirmed a charter 
by Sir John Sadserf vicar of the parish church of Kilterne, granting, with consent of Master 



1 Regist. Morav., p. 82. 7 See the following notices. 

2 Ragman Rolls, p. 144. 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 2. 

3 Resist, de Aberbrothoc, vol. i. p. 287. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. lii. fol. 106. 
* Kilravock Charters. 5 Regist. Morav., p. 210. 10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fol. 17. 

6 Balnagown Charters. Beauly Charters. Reg. Mag. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 4 

Sig., lib. xx. no. 134 ; lib. xxx. no. 566. p. 478. 



ROSEMAKKIE.] PAROCHI ALE S. 581 

Quintigern Monepenny dean and vicar general of Eos during the vacancy of the see, and of 
the chapter, to the deceased John Monro in Kilterne and his heirs the lands of the vicar's croft 
of Kilterue, reserving to the vicar the manse and croft as then occupied. 1 

In 1584 (4 February) King James VI. confirmed a charter by Henry Kincaid, rector of the 
parish church of Lymnolair and canon of the cathedral church of Eoss, granting to Master John 
Robertsoun treasurer and his wife Elisabeth Baillie and their heirs, with remainder to John's 
heirs whomsoever, the croft called Lymnolair lying within the bounds of the canonry. 2 In the 
same year (15 February) he confirmed a charter by the same Henry, granting to John Irving 
and the heirs male of his body, with remainder to his heirs male whomsoever, the tenement and 
manse with the garden called ' the personis of Lumlair ' in the canonry of Eos, situated between 
the lands of tile rector of Eoskein on the east and the lands of the same John on the west and 
north respectively. 3 

In 1584 King James VI. confirmed a charter by Master Thomas Hay rector of Logie, grant 
ing to John Irving burgess of Eosmarkie and Margaret Gumming his wife, and to John's male 
heirs, the croft of the rectory of Logie in the canonry, earldom, and diocese of Eoss. 4 In 1619 
Thomas Irwing was served heir to his father Andrew Irwing in the canonry of Eoss in the manse 
of the rectory of Logie in the canonry, with the garden of the same, of the extent of 6s. 8d. 5 

In 1584 King James VI. confirmed a charter by the deceased Gavin Dumbar rector of Eos- 
chene, granting in heritage to Helen Tailzeour the relict of the deceased Gilbert Dick a croft 
lying in the canonry of Eoss between the croft of the dean on the east and the croft belonging 
to the rector of Lymnolair on the west, the common pasture of Deanis Pot on the south and 
the garden of the said Gavin on the north. 6 In 1607 Thomas Urquhart of Cromertie was 
served heir to his grandfather Walter Urquhart sheriff of Cromertie in the croft of the rectory 
of Eoskein with a piece of land called the Eig in the Field 'lie Middilschede' within the canonry, 
of the extent of 10 shillings feuferine. 7 In 1621 George Dunbar was served heir to his father 
James Dunbar of Newtoun in the manse and garden of the rector of Eoskene in the canonry 
of Eoss, of the extent of 2s. 4d. 8 

The rector of Alnes had a croft in the canonry lying on the east side of the dean's croft. 9 

In 1587 King James VI. confirmed a charter by Master Eobert Burnet vicar of Cowtane, 
granting in heritage to John Irwing in the canonry of Eoss the manse of the vicarage lying 
between the manse of the vicar of Kilmure on the east, the manse of Kincardin on the west, 
the common road on the south, and the common vennel descending between the vicar's manse 
and the Middilsched on the north. 10 

In 1604 John Urquhart was served heir male of entail and provision to his father Walter 
Urquhart sheriff of Cromartie in the manse or croft of the rector of Awach in the canonry of 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 114. 5 Retours. 

* Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. fol. 60. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 14. 

' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. I. fol. 73. 7 Retours. 6 Ibid. 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. 1. fol. 60. See LOGIE EASTEB, 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 14. 

p. 466. 10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol. 89. See CONTIJJ, p. 505. 



582 ORIGIN ES [HOSEMARKIE. 

Ross, of the extent of 40s. 1 In 1607 Thomas Urquhart of Oomertie was served heir to his 
grandfather Walter Urquhart sheriff of Cromertie in the manse of the rectory of Awache, of 
the extent of 42s. feuferme. 2 In 1611 Edward Lord Bruce of Kinloss was served heir male to 
his father Lord Edward in certain lands in the parish of Avoch, and in a manse within the 
canonry, apparently considered to be within the same parish. 3 

In 1621 George Dunbar was served heir to his father James Dunbar of Newtoun in the 
manse and garden of Kilmuir Easter in the canonry of Ross, of the extent of 2s. 4d. 4 

In 1624 Duncan Bayne of Logye, the son of the deceased Alexander Bane by his wife Agnes 
Fraser, was served heir male to his grandfather Alexander Bayne of Tullich in the manse of 
the rectory of Kineairclyne in the canonry of Ross, of the extent of a penny blench ferme. 5 

The church of Rosmarky, dedicated to Saint Boniface, stood in the town of Rosmarky on a 
bank of sand near the sea shore. 6 In repairing it in 1735 there were found in a vault under 
an ancient steeple some stone coffins of rude workmanship. 7 A new church was built in 1821 
on the same site. 8 A well at Rosmarkie is still known as Saint Boniface' Well. 9 

The cathedral church, dedicated to Saint Peter and Saint Boniface, stood at the canonry 
(now Fortrose) about a mile west from the parish church. 10 When entire, it consisted of choir 
and nave with aisles, eastern Lady chapel, western tower, and chapterhouse at the north-east 
end ; its remains consist of ' the south aisle to chancel and nave, and the detached chapterhouse,' 
all in the Middle-pointed style. 11 The seal of the chapter, now used as that of the burgh, bears 
the figures of Saint Peter and Saint Boniface, and the inscription SIGILLTM SANCTOKVM PETKI 
ET BONEFACII DE ROSMARKIN. 12 A large old bell, now hung in a modern spire, bears the 
name of Thomas Tulloch bishop of Ross, the date 1460, and an inscription intimating its 
dedication to the Virgin Mary and Saint Boniface. 13 

In the cathedral church was a number of chaplainries, the chaplains of which held some lands 
and revenues in common. In 1451 two chaplains (apparently of the cathedral), Sir John Yonge 
and Sir David Faw, witnessed a transumpt of certain charters made within it. 14 In 1504 John 
bishop of Ross granted, and King James IV. confirmed to the chaplains of the cathedral church 
of Ross a yearly revenue of 10 from a tenement of land in the burgh of Linlithgw. 15 Among 
the particulars of the rental of assumptions, given in by Bishop Henry Sinclair at the Reformation 
to the collector of thirds, are stated 13^ muttons as given to the ' cheplane of the bishoprick.' 16 
In 1580 King James VI. granted in heritage to Robert Grahame the three crofts of land called 
the lands of the chaplains of the cathedral church of Ross and belonging to the chaplains and 



1 Retours. 2 Ibid. 3 Ibid. 4 Ibid. ~" Ibid. " Neale's Ecclesiological Notes, pp. 53-57 ; in which 

6 Camerarius, p. 117. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. sec a minute description of the ruins. 
Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. 12 Old and New Stat. Ace. 

7 Old Stat. Ace. Bishop Leslie about the year 1578 I3 Ibid. The bishop at the above date appears to 
says that the town was adorned with the relics of have been Thomas Urquhart, not Thomas Tulloch. 
Saint Boniface and the sepulchres and monuments of Sec Keith's Bishops. 

his relatives. 8 New Stat. Ace. 9 Ibid. 14 Balnagown Charters. 

10 Lcslaeus de Gestis Scotorum (1578), p. 17. Old 15 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiv. no. 85. 

Stat. Ace. 16 Book of Assumptions. 



ROSEMARKIE.] PAROCHIALES- 583 

stallers there founded ; two of which crofts without houses lay between the common lands of 
Eoismerkie on the north and south the lands of the bishoprick let in feuferme to Colin Makenze 
of Kintaill, the common road between the canonry of Ross and Eoismerkie, and the common 
lands of Eosemarkie, on the north (east?) and the green path (transitum viridem) between 
the canonry and the fishertown of the same on the west ; and the third croft with houses had 
a piece of land called the Bischopis Sched, then let to the same Colin in feuferme, on the east 
the public street of the canonry on the south the path between the canonry and 'lie Plotcok' 
on the west and the community (common lands) and houses of Plotcok on the north ; with 
reservation of the usufruct and liferent to the existing chaplains and stallers ; the grantee paying 
yearly a silver penny at the cathedral on the feast of Pentecost to the King, if asked, and the 
sum of 20 Scots at the usual terms to the master of the grammar school of the town of the 
canonry of Ross. 1 

There was a chapel in the cathedral church dedicated to Saint Nicolas, in which in the year 
1451 a transumpt of certain charters produced by John Ross lord of Balnagowan was made in 
presence of Andrew Munro archdeacon of Ross. 2 

In 1512 King James IV. granted anew to William Makculloch of Pladdis certain lands 
resigned by him (including Balmoduthy, or Baillieduich), for payment of the usual services and 
of 5 marks Scots yearly to a perpetual chaplain officiating in the cathedral church of Ross. 3 
In 1621 John Barbour was served heir to his father William Barbour in the canonry of Ross 
in the lands of the chaplainry of Ballacuithe founded within the canonry, of the extent of 
33s. 4d., and in lands of the sowing of 3 firlots of bear in the croft called Grantiscroft in the 
canonry of Ross and burgh of Rosemarkie. 4 

In 1529 (18 May and 22 June) King James V. presented Sir William Spens to the chaplainry 
founded by the King's predecessors in the cathedral church of Ross on 5 of yearly revenue 
from the lands of Ardifaly (or Arthifale) in the lordship of Ardmanach assigned to that 
chaplainry, when it should be vacant by the resignation of Sir John Spens. 5 In 1537 the same 
king presented Sir Patrick Hay to the chaplainry of Ardorfaily in the cathedral church of Ross, 
vacant by the decease of Sir William Spens. 6 In 1543 Sir Patrick Hay, styled chaplain of 
the chaplainry of Ardewalie in the diocese of Ross, with the consent of Queen Mary, of the 
Earl of Arran, and of Robert bishop of Ross, granted to John Chalmer the kirklands of the 
chaplainry with all their pertinents, extending in his rental to 10 marks Scots, 2 muttons, and 
2 dozen of poultry, for the yearly payment of 7 Scots and the other dues, in augmentation 
of the rental by 6s. 8d. 7 In 1546 Queen Mary presented Sir David Barchan to the chaplainry 
of Ardinfaill in the cathedral church of Ross, vacant or when Vacant by the demission or 
decease of Sir Patrick Hay. 8 Between 1561 and 1566 Sir David Barquhan held the chaplainries 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 17. * Retours. 

3 Balnagown Charters. See KILMUIR EASTER, p. ^ Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. viii. ff. 48, 59. 

462. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xi. fol. 7. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xviii. no. 82. Reg. Sec. Sig., 7 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xvii. fol. 87. 

vol. iv. fol. 197. See TAIN, p. 429. 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xx. fol. 56. 



584 OEIGINES [BOSEMARKIE. 

of ' Sanct Lawrent and Arfaill lyand within the diocy of Ros,' the former, as we have seen, 
founded in the castle of Dingwall. 1 In 1569 King James VI. presented Donald Adamsoun 
' instructar and teichar of the youth within the burch of Dingwall' to the chaplainries of Saint 
Lawrance in Dingwall and Ardafaily in Ardmannoch, vacant by the decease of David Barchan. 2 
In 1575 the same king granted for seven years to James Dauidsoun the son of John Dauidsoun 
in Edinburgh, ' in support of his sustentation at the scule,' the chaplainry ' of Saint Lawrence 
and Ardfeild in Dingwall,' vacant by the demission of Donald Adamesoun promoted to the sub- 
chantrv of Ross. 3 In 1582, the same chaplainry or chaplainries, styled ' of Sanctlaurence and 
Ardfaill in Dingwall,' formerly granted by King James VI. to James Dauidsoun the son of 
John Dauidsoun burgess of Edinburgh ' for his intertenement at the scoleis' for the term of 
seven years, being vacant by the expiration of that term, the King granted to him the same 
chaplainrv for life ' in forder support of his sustentatioun at the scolis and intertenement 
vtherwayis.'* In 1586 the same king granted for seven years to Thomas Dauidsoun the son of 
John Dauidsoun burgess of Edinburgh, and ' bursar in the college of Cambrige in Ingland 
... to hald and interteny him at the said college for his better educatioun in vertew and 
guid lettres,' the chaplainries of Dunskeyth and of Sanct Lawrence in Ardefaill, not exceed 
ing the sum of 30 yearly, and vacant by the expiration of a grant to the same Thomas 
and his brother James or in any other way. 5 In 1587 the same king granted for seven years 
to Robert Monro the son of Hucheoun Monro in Fyreis, ' to hald and interteny him at the 
scules,' the same two chaplainries, then vacant by the expiration of grants made to two sons 
of John Dauidsoun tailor, or by ' thair not abyding actuallie at the scules,' or otherwise. 6 
In 1615 Murdoc M'Kenzie of Ardafailie was served heir male to his father Rodoric M'Kenzie 
of Ardafalie in the church lands of the chaplainry of Ardafalie in the diocese of Ross, of the 
extent of 7. 7 In 1662 Colin M'Kenzie of Reidcastell was served heir male to his father 
Roderic in the chapel-lands of Ardafaillis with the glebe, in the diocese of Ross, of old in the 
sherift'dom of Innernes, and then in the sheriffdom of Ross, of the extent of 7 feuferme.' 8 
Among the chaplainries in the cathedral church were three known as those of Aines, endowed 
from lands in the parish of Alnes, apparently the lands of Allies, Fyrish, and Culcragy. In 
1539 King James V. presented Sir Thomas Chirnsyde to the chaplainry of Alnes, vacant or 
when vacant by the resignation or decease of Sir Walter Fethy. 9 In 1558 Queen Mary pre 
sented Master Alexander Makkenze to one of the chaplainries called of Alnes Fyres situated in 
the cathedral church of Ross, vacant by the decease of Sir Patrick Hay. 10 In 1574 (15 October) 
King James VI. granted for seven years to Thomas Dauidsoun, the son of Patrick Dauidsoun 
Ros Herauld, one of the three chaplainries of Alnes in the diocese of Ros, vacant by the decease 
of Sir James Butchert commanding the principal master of Sanct Leonardis college within the 

1 Book of Assumptions. See DINGWAI.T.. p. 484. 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Iv. fol. 32. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 86. ? Retours. 
1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 125. Ibid. 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 29. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xiii. 161. 1. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liv. fol. 53. "> Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxix. fol. 64. 



ROSEMARKIE.] PAROCHIALES. 585 

university of Sanctandrois to receive the grantee under his care and discipline. 1 In 1580 (14 
October) the same king granted for life to the same Thomas one of the same three chaplainries, 
vacant by the decease of Sir James Busehart or by the expiration of the space of seven years for 
which it was granted to the same Thomas Dauidsoun. 2 In 1581 he granted for life to Master 
John Eobertsoun, one of the professors of theology in the New College of Sanetandrois, the 
third of his own prebend or chaplainry called the chaplaiury of Culcragy, one of the chaplainries 
of Alnes in the diocese of Ros, the grant to begin in 1580. 3 In 1583 he granted for seven 
years to Alexander Lowis, the son of Ninian Lowis burgess of Edinburgh, for his education at 
school the chaplainry of Alnes (that of Fyrish) vacant by the decease of Master Alexander 
M'Kainze. 4 In 1585 he confirmed a grant of the chapel-lands of Navitie in Cromarty by certain 
of the canons and chaplains of the cathedral, including Thomas Ros principal chaplain of Alnes, 
and James Vischert one of the chaplains of Alnes. 5 In 1619 Alexander Thornsone was served 
heir to his father William Thomsone in the canonry of Ross in 2 roods or rigs of land in 
Oversched in another rood there in 2 roods in Middlcsched 2 roods or rigs in Nethersched 
2 rigs in the acres within the bounds of the burgage of Rosmarkie 1^ rig under the wood 
2 roods or rigs near the loch 1 rood and 1 rig between the lands called Langseyfeild 2 
roods in Schortseyfeild within the bounds of the canonry of Ross and burgage of Rosmarkie 
all lying within the chaplainries of Mullochie and Culeragie and bishoprick of Ross of the 
extent of 4, 6s. 6 In 1621 George Dunbar was served heir to his father James Dunbar of 
Newtown in various lands, including those of the chaplainry of Alnes, of the extent of 42s. 
and 2s. in augmentation. 7 In 1645 Alexander Thomson was served heir to his father William 
burgess of Chanorie in the same lands as in 1619, and of the same extent. 8 In 1681 a con 
firmation of the barony of Tarbet by King Charles II., in favour of Sir George M'Kenzie of 
Tarbett and of John M'Kenzie his son, included the three chapels of Alnes founded from the 
teindsheaves of the kirk of Alnes. 9 

In 1547 Queen Mary presented Master Thomas Ker to the chaplainry and altarage of Obstule 
in the cathedral church of Ross, vacant by the decease of Sir John Stevinsoun. 10 Between 1561 
and 1566 the chaplainry called Obstull in the diocese of Ross was held by Master John Dumbar 
parson of Cuinnok, and by him leased to George Monro of Dalcarty. 11 In 1583 King James VI. 
confirmed a charter by Hector Monro chaplain of the chaplainry of Obstuill in the earldom of 
Boss, granting, with the consent of Robert Monro of Foulis the patron of the same, to George 
Monro the patron's son the town and lands of Obstuill, with the boat, fishing, and yair of the 



1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 79. been a small sheet of water that lay near the public 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 32. road from Rosemarkie to Fortrose, and about the year 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. \lvii. fol. 70. 1788 was drained by the parish minister. See Old 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 98. Stat. Ace. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. lii. fol. 71. See post. It does 7 Retours. 8 Ibid, 
not appear from this at what time Thomas Ros held 9 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. viii. p. 385. 

the principal chaplainry of Alnes. James Vischert is 10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 52. See ROSKEEN, p. 

evidently the same as Sir James Busehart. 469. 

6 Retours. The loch here mentioned seems to have " Book of Assignations. 

VOL. II. 4 E 



586 OEIGINES [ROSEMABKIE. 

same, belonging to the chaplainry. 1 In 1635 Hugh Lord Fraser of Lovat was served heir male 
to his father Symon Lord Fraser in various subjects including the superiority and advowson of 
the chaplainry of Obstuill and the salmon fishing of the same in the earldom of Eos. 2 

In 1549 Queen Mary presented George Dunbar, as we have seen, to the vicarage of Roismerky ; 
and at the same time she presented him to the chaplainry of the chapel of Saint John of Ellen ; 
both in the diocese of Ross and vacant by the demission of Sir Thomas Stevinsoun. 8 

In 1574 King James VI. granted for seven years to Patrick Dunbar the son of George Dunbar 
of Avach, ' in support of his sustentatioun at the scule,' the chaplainry of Drimmen in the diocese 
of Ross, situated in the chapel of Saint Boneface, vacant by the decease of Sir Donald Reid, and 
not exceeding in yearly value the sum of 20 marks Scots.* In 1580 the same king granted 
for seven years to John Dunbar the son of George Dunbar of Avache for the same purpose the 
same chaplainry, styled of Drummis, vacant ' be ressoun the gift maid be his Hienes to Patrick 
Dunbar student and bursar in grammcr of the said chaplanerie for the space of sevin yeiris is 
alredie expyrit and furthrun.' 5 In 1584 he confirmed a grant of the churchlands of the 
chaplainry of Drum in the diocese and earldom of Ross, made by Sir Homer Fraser the chaplain 
to Robert Monro of Foulis with the consent of Master Quintigern Monypenny dean and vicar 
general, and of the canons and chapter. 6 In 1608 Robert Monro was served heir male of entail 
and provision to his father Master Hector Monro of Foullis in the lands of the chaplainry of 
Drummond, with the mill, brewhouse, and brewhouse croft, of the extent of 8, 13s. 4d. 7 

In 1578 King James VI. granted to Thomas Dauidsoun the son of John Dauidsoun in 
Edinburch, 'in support of his sustentatioun at the scole for the space of sevin yeiris,' the 
chaplainry of Nevitie in the diocese of Ross, ' pertenyng to the chanrie kirk thairof,' vacant 
by the decease of Sir Symon Blyth. 8 In 1580, and again in 1582, he granted to the same 
Thomas for life the common lands of Navitie, extending to 12 bolls of victual, and formerly 
belonging to the chaplains of the cathedral church of Ross. 9 In 1585 (2 June) the same king 
confirmed a charter by Thomas Ros principal chaplain of Alnes William Hay, Donald Reid, 
and John Greirsoun, vicars of the cathedral church of Ross and Jerome (Hieronimus] Paip and 
James Vischert chaplains of Cullis and of Alnes -with the consent of John bishop of Ross, and 
of the dean and chapter granting to Master David Chalmeris of Casteltoun of Ormont and his 
heirs the two oxgangs of Navitie in the sheriffdom of Cromartie, lying between the lands of the 
sheriff of Cromartie on the west, the lands of Thomas Duff on the east, the seashore on the 
south, and the King's common road or the common pasture of the town of Navitie on the north. 10 
In the same year (24 September) King James granted for seven years from 1584 to John Mowat 



' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlix. fol. 132. 4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlii. fol. 27. See KILTEARN, 

2 Retours. p. 479. 5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 31. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiii. fol. 7. It does not appear 6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 90. 7 Retours. 
from the terms of the grant whether this chapel stood 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlv. fol. 72. See CROMARTY, 
in the parish church or in the cathedral. Saint John p. 560. 

of Ellen seems to be John bishop of Ely, commemorated 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol xlvi. fol. 109 ; vol. xlix. fol. 2. 
6 May. i Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. Hi. fol. 71. 



ROSEMARKIE.] PAROCHIALES. 587 

' for his intertenement at the scules,' the chaplainry of Navitie belonging of old in common to 
the canons of Boss. 1 In 1592 he granted or confirmed to Master David Chalmer of Ormound 
the two oxgangs of Nauitie in the sheriffdom of Cromertie. 2 In 1607 William Chalmer apparent 
of Ormond was served heir male to his father Master David in the same two oxgangs, of the 
extent of 12 bolls of meal and other dues. 3 In 1681 the chaplainry of Navity was included 
in a confirmation of the barony of Tarbet by King Charles II. in favour of Sir George M'Kenzie 
of Tarbett and John M'Kenzie his son.* 

From one of the above notices (1585) it would appear that the chaplainry of Cullis was 
served within the cathedral church. 5 

The chaplainry of Munlochy, noticed above, seems also to have been founded in the cathedral 
of Koss. 6 

At the Reformation the vicarage of Rosmarky, as given up by Alexander Pedder, procurator 
for George Dumbar parson of Kilmowr and vicar of Rosmarky, was stated at 20 ' quhen all 
teindis and small offrandis was in vse of payment ; ' but the vicar had received nothing for three 
years. 7 About 1569 William Hay reader at Channonrie had for his stipend 40 marks, and about 
1571 he had 50 marks. 8 In 1570 James Buschart as reader had 20. 9 In 1574 the minister at 
Chanonrie or Rosmarkny and Cromartie had a stipend of 118, 10s. 8-|d. ; and the reader had 
20, the kirklands, and other perquisites. 10 In 1576 Alexander bishop of Ross, minister at 
Chanonrie and Rosmarkny, had for his living two-thirds of his bishoprick ; and the reader had 
20, the vicar's manse at Rosemarkny, the kirkland, and other perquisites. 11 

According to the ancient taxation of the thirteenth century the bishoprick of Ross was valued 
at the yearly sum of 351, 19s. 8-^d., which, when taxed at the rate of 5d. per mark, gave 
10, 19s. ll^d. and the half of ^d. 1>J In the Taxatio Seculi xvi. it is taxed at the rate of 248, 
and in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued at 1200 marks. 13 At the Reformation according 
to the rental already cited the bishoprick was worth yearly 462, 4s. 2d. 14 

In Baiamund's Roll the deanery of Ross is taxed at 8 ; in the Taxatio Sec. xvi. at 
24, 16s. ; and in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued at 80. 15 At the Reformation it was 
stated to the collector of thirds at 20 bolls of victual, of which 5 chalders were paid from the 
teinds of Ardrosser, and 6 chalders 1 boll from the quarter teinds of Rosmerkin and Crumbathy, 
together with 35 in money, deducing yearly 20 marks 'to the chorislatt for his fie.' 16 

The chantry is taxed in Baiamund at 6, 13s. 4d., and in the Taxatio Sec. XTI. at 
20, 13s. 3d. ; and in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued at 66, 13s. 4d. 17 The rental of the 
chantry at the Reformation is thus stated by the chanter ' In victuall viii chalder; in silver 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. liii. fol. 46. 6 See SUDDY, p. 538, and ROSEMAEKIE, p. 585. 

1 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. iii. p. 601. 3 Retours. 7 Book of Assumptions. 

* Acta Parl. Scot., vol. viii. p. 385. 8 Register of Ministers. 9 Ibid. 

5 See NIG o, p. 454. There is a place named Culish I0 Book of Assignations. "Ibid. 

in the modern parish of Knockbain, including the I2 Reg. Prior. S. Andree, pp. 28, 360, 361. Reg. de 

greater part of the old parishes of Kilmuir Wester and Aberbrothoc, vol. i. p. 231. 

Snddy. There is nothing in the recorded notices of 13 MSS. in Adv. Lib. 

the chaplainry to determine the locality of the lands " Book of Assumptions. 15 MSS. in Adv. Lib. 

from which it was endowed. 16 Book of Assumptions. " MSS. in Adv. Lib. 



588 ORIGINES [ROSEMARKIE. 

v* x merkis. Maister Williame Cranstoun lies of the said chantry in yeirlie pensioun the sowme 
of xxx lib. John Gibiesoun chorister in the channonry of Ross lies yeirlie for his fie xxi merkis. 
Summa of the money payit zeirlie out of the chantry of Boss extendand to the sowme of 
Ixvi merkis.' 1 

In Baiamund the chancellary is taxed at 8, and in the Taxatio Sec. xvi. at 24, 16s. ; in 
the Libellus Taxationum it is valued at 80. 2 The rental of assumptions between 1561 and 
1566 gives us the following statement ' The rentall of the chansellarie of Eos pertenand to 
Master Duncan Chalmere vsufructuare. The personage of Suddye, the personage and vicarage 
of Kennetis, with the fourt pairt of the teind shavis of Cromarte and Eosmerkie, sett in 
assedatioun to Master Dauid Chalmer titular of the samin and Eichard Wrwing his factour for 
the sowme of xiii xx merkis of the quhilk thair is to be deducit to the vicaris and chaplandis 
ministaris of the samin the sowme of 1 merkis.' 3 

In Baiamund, the Taxatio Sec. xvi., and the Libellus, the treasurership is given at the 
same sums as the chancellary. 4 In the rental of the assumption of thirds we have it as fol 
lows < The rentall of the thesaurarie of Eos. Item the fruitis of the said thesaurarie and 

teind shavis of the samin, videlicet, the kirkis of Logy and Vrquhart, and the quarter of 
Crumarty and Eosmerky, sett in assedatioun to Mathow Hamiltoun of Mylneburne for the 
sowme of iii merkis- of the quhilk thair is to be deducit for the vphold of the kirkis and 
to the ministaris i c merkis and sua restis ii c merkis.' 5 

The subdeanery is rated in Baiamund at 12, and in the Taxatio Sec. xvi. at 37, 4s. ; 
and in the Libellus it is valued at 120. 6 The subdean's prebend consisted of the churches 
of Tayne and Eddirtane, which at the Eeformation yielded together the sum of 300 marks 
6s. 8d. 7 

The subchantry is taxed in Baiamund at 4, and in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued 
at 40. 8 At the Eeformation it was stated at 102, 13s. 4d. 9 

The archdeaconry, taxed in Baiamund at 8, and in the Taxatio See. xvi. at 24, 16s., 
is valued in the Libellus at 80, and in the rental of assumptions at 12, 13s. 4d. and 
xx chalders of victual. 10 

The valuations of the prebends of the other canons are given above under the heads of 
their respective parishes. 11 

The chaplainry of Ballacuithe, as we have seen, was of the yearly value of 5 marks Scots. 12 

The chaplainry of Ardifaly, originally of the yearly value of 5, was latterly valued at 
7. 13 At the Eeformation the united value of the chaplainries of Saint Laurence and Arfaill, 
' set in few be chartour and seasing,' was 15. u 

1 Book of Assumptions. 2 MSS. in Adv. Lib. 'Book of Assumptions. See TAIN, p. 427, and 

3 Book of Assumptions. 4 MSS. in Adv. Lib. EDDERTOUN, p. 415. 

Book of Assumptions. The statement is given and 8 MSS. in Adv. Lib. 9 See URRAY, p. 519. 

signed by James Lamb notary public at the command 10 See KILLEARNAN, p. 525. 

of the said Mathew the factor, who could not write " See pp. 411, 461, 466, 469, 473, 479, 482, 505, 542, 

mamt propria, 553, 557. 12 See p. 583. ll Ibid. 

6 MSS. iu Adv. Lib, u Book of Assumptions. 



ROSEMAHKIE.] PAROCHIALES. 589 

One of the three chaplainries of Aines (it is not stated which) was of the extent of 
about 42s. 1 

Between 1561 and 1566 the chaplainry of Obstull was leased yearly for the sum of 20. 2 
The chaplainry of Drummond appears to have been of the yearly value of 8, 13s. 4d. 3 
The chaplainry of Navity extended yearly to 12 bolls victual.* 
The chaplainry of Munlochy was probably of the yearly extent of 4. 5 
In 1579 appears in record John Irving of Kynnok. 6 In the year 1580 King James VI. 
confirmed a charter by the deceased Alexander bishop of Boss, granting to John Irwing in 
the canonry and Margaret Cumyng his wife, and their heirs born between them, with remain 
der to John's own heirs, the churchlands of Kynnok in the bishoprick of Ross, extending to 
a half davach. 7 In 1584 John Irwyng of Kynnok and his wife Margaret again appear in 
record, and had a house in the canonry. 8 

In 1655 Sir George M'Keinzie of Tarbit Baronet was served heir male to his father Sir 
George in a fifth part of the lands of Broomhill in the parish of Eosemarkie, of the extent 
of 6. 9 

The burgh of Eosemarkie, styled by Bishop Leslie about 1578 a very ancient town, is 
said to have been erected a royal burgh (or burgh of regality ?) by ' Alexander King of 
Scots.' 10 In 1255 a charter by Laurence the soldier (miles), witnessed by several of the clergy 
of Eoss, was given at Eosmarc, apparently the burgh. 11 In 1455 ' the toun of Forterose 
callit the Channorie of Eose' was annexed by King James II. to the burgh of Eois- 
markie. 12 In 1505 King James IV. granted to Andrew Aytoun captain of the castle of 
Striueling the customs of all the burghs and bounds between Banf and Orknay (a grant which 
included Eosemarkie), for the yearly payment of 50 to the King's comptroller and others. 13 
In 1506 a charter by the same king is dated ' at Channonry in Eoss.' 14 In 1545 Queen 
Mary appointed Master Thomas Marioribanks burgess of Edinburgh for seven years customer 
of the burgh of Innernes and within all the bounds of Eos and other counties, he paying 
yearly the sum of 40 Scots. 15 In 1553 the Queen, on the narrative that the town of Eos- 
merkie had been of old created a burgh of regality by her predecessors, and had been annexed 
to the burgh of the Channonry of Eos, and desirous that the inhabitants should provide for 
the lodging of strangers resorting thither, granted, in favour of David bishop of Eos, that 
the bailies, burgesses, and inhabitants of Eosmerkie should have within the burgh a market 
cross, a weekly market on Saturday for all kinds of merchandise and wares, and yearly fairs 
upon Saint Peter's day (1 August) and All-hallow-day (1 November), and on the octaves of 
both, with power to the bailies to levy all the customs and make payment of them to the 

1 Seep. 585. 2 Book of Assumptions. I0 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. p. 030; vol. vii. p. 224. 

3 See p. 586. 4 Ibid. Old Stat. Ace. Leslaeus de Gestis Scotorum, p. 17. 



5 See SUDDY, p. 538. 

6 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvi. fol. 53. 
? Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvii. fol. 42. 

8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. li. fol. 62. 

9 Retours. 



1 Beauly Charters. 

2 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. p. 630; vol. vii. p. 224. 

3 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 30. 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iii. fol. 81. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. six. fol. 28. 



590 ORIGINES [ROSEMARKIE. 

bishop. 1 In 1554 the same queen created the town of Kosmarky a burgh of barony in favour 
of the bailies, council, and community, the grantees paying yearly to the bishop of Ross the 
usual burgh fermes, and a wild goose (anser silvestris) or the common price of the same on 
the entry of every burgess. 2 In 1555, 1556, 1557, and 1562, charters are given by various 
persons at the Chanonry of Ross ; one of them is witnessed by George Monypenny, Alexan 
der Thomesoun, and Richard Irving, inhabitants of the Chanonry, and another by (appa 
rently) the same Alexander Thomesoun ; and two are granted by the bishop, on condition of 
the grantee performing three suits at the three head courts yearly held at the Chanonry. 3 
In 1563 Queen Mary granted to John Wyischart burgess of Kirkwall the non-entry and other 
dues of the crofts and burgh roods beside the town of Rosmerky, extending to three roods 
or thereby, with the ' outsettis, houss, biggingis, and yairdis,' formerly belonging to the 
deceased Andrew Wischart his grandfather, provided that no other than his grandfather had 
been heritably infeft in the same.* In 1569 King James VI. granted in heritage to Andrew 
Monro of Ncwmoir the escheat of all the goods, cattle, and corn upon the piece of land 
called the Bischoppis Sched (in the Chanonry), and the quarter lands of Mekill Allane (in 
Tarbat), which belonged to John formerly bishop of Ross ' of this instant crop and yeir of 
God i m vh Ixix yeiris and sawin to his behuif,' and were forfeited by him for treason and 
lesemajesty. 5 In 1590 the same king created Forterose, ' of old called the Channonrie of 
Rosse,' a royal burgh, with weekly markets on Saturday and Monday, and two yearly fairs, 
one on Saint Bonnieface day and the other on the day called Pardon day (Easter). 6 In 1592 
he confirmed the union of Forterose and Rosemarkie by King James II. 7 In 1599 a contract 
of marriage between Margaret the daughter of William Ros of Kilravok and Murdoch the 
son of Rorie M'Kenzie of Ardafailie was made at the Chanorie of Ros. 8 In 1612 King 
James VI. confirmed the erection of the burgh of Roismarkie and all the privileges granted 
to it by his predecessors Alexander King of Scots and James II. King of Scots, and also 
the union of the towns by the latter king uniting them anew, and granting all the privileges 
of the burgh of Roismarkie (including the fairs on Saint Peter's and All Saints' days) to the 
united burgh, which was to be governed by the provost, bailies, and council of the former. 9 
In 1615 Charles Pedder was served heir to his father James Pedder burgess of the Chanonry 
of Ross in a piece of the common lands of Platcok within the bounds of the college of the 
Chanonry, of the extent of 8s. ferme. 10 In 1641 King Charles I. confirmed his father's charter 
of 1612. 11 In 1655 Sir George M'Keinzie of Tarbit Baronet was served heir male to his 
father Sir George in 6 pecks of lands in the Chanonry of Ross and burgh of Rosemarkie, 

each peck of the extent of 4s. and 2d. 12 In 1661 King Charles II considering the ruinous 

state of the burgh of Rosemarkie then almost depopulated, and the flourishing condition of 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxv. fol. 56. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. vii. p. 224. " Ibid. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxvi. fol. 39. s Kilravock Charters. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xx\i. nn. 267, 359, 481, 581. s Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. p. 630; vol. vii. pp. 224, 
' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxi. fol. 60. 225. I0 Retours. 
' Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxviii. fol. 95. " Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. p. 630. Ia Retours. 



ROSEMARKIE.] PAEOCHIALES. 591 

the burgh of Forterose, which ' is within a rig length to the same old and ruinous burgh, 
and of a most pleasant stance and cituation, and of old the cathedrall seate of the dyocie of 
Rosse,' and that the latter still retained its privileges as a royal burgh and had been enrolled 
as such by an act of the parliament then sitting with the consent of the inhabitants of 
Rosemarkie, who were to be burgesses of Forterose, confirmed all previous charters and infeft- 
ments ; ordained that the united towns should thenceforth be called the burgh of Forterose ; 
changed the weekly markets from Saturday and Monday to Tuesday and Friday ; and renewed 
the grants of the yearly fairs, that called Saint Bonniface to begin on 1C March, and that 
called Pardon day to begin on Whitsunday, each continuing for three days, and the fairs 
formerly held in Rosemarkie on Saint Peter's day and Hallowmes to be held there or at 
Forterose as the inhabitants of both might think expedient. 1 Fairs are now held at Fortrose 
on the first Wednesday of April, the third Wednesday of June, and the first Wednesday of 
November. 2 The houses of the inhabitants are chiefly the old residences of the canons. 3 
The old seal of the chapter of Ross, as above stated, is now used as the seal of the burgh of 
Fortrose. 4 The cross of Rosemarkie still stands at the west end of the town, and the seal 
of the burgh, still in existence, bears the legend SIGILLUM COMMVNE BVKGI DE HOS- 

MARK.YN. 5 

Between the years 1561 and 1566, as we have seen, Henry bishop of Ross complained that 
his palace, or, as it was called, the house and place of the Chanonry, had been taken and kept 
from him for nine months by ' broken men,' and that he was therefore compelled to undergo 
considerable expense in paying men to defend it. 6 His successor Bishop Leslie about the year 
1578 describes it as the bishop's palace, situated not far from the dwellings of the canons, and 
in splendour and magnificence inferior to few in the country. 7 In 1578, as above stated, 
King James VI. granted in heritage to Henry Lord Methuen the temporality of the bishoprick 
and the ' castle, house, and place of the Chanonrie,' till a new bishop should be appointed. 8 
In 1579 (20 November) the same king remitted to Colin Makcainzie of Kintaill, Rodoric 
Makcainzie his brother german, John Irving of Kynnok, and Donald M'Intagart, all action 
which he had against them for their violence and treasonable coming with accomplices to the 
number of 100 or thereby, armed with coats of mail, steel caps (galleris cullibeis), swords, 
daggers, shields, ordnance great and small (bombardii bombardictdis), spears, lances, axes, bows, 
arrows, and other instruments of war, on the 22d day of September 1578, to the castle, 
fortalice, and palace of Channonrie of Ros belonging to the bishoprick, having heard and 
certainly understood the death of Alexander bishop of Ros, who died on that day, with the 
fixed purpose and deliberate intention to surprise and take the said castle, fortalice, and peel 
so that they the more easily effected their purpose, laid violent hands on the persons of William 
Irving messenger, Thomas Merschall writer, and John Robertsoun the servitor of the deceased 

1 Acta Parl. Scot, vol. vii. pp. 224, 225. 3 New Stat Ace. 

1 New Stat. Ace. and Almanacks. The Calendar of 4 See above, p. 582. 

Fearn in the seventeenth century mentions a fair at 5 New Stat. Ace. E See p. 569. 

Chanonry in the month of April. 7 De Gestis Scotorum, p. 17. 8 See p. 570. 



592 ORIGINES [ROSEMARKIE. 

bishop, who were then in the city of the Channonrie, and caused them to be carried prisoners 
to the castle called the Keidcastell belonging to Colin Mackcainzie and distant about 10 miles 
from the Channonrie, detaining them there as prisoners for 24 hours, continually beating them 
in terrorem, and giving occasion to all the servitors of the deceased bishop and to others the 
King's lieges to flee and hide themselves from the cruelty of the said Colin and his accomplices, 
and to leave the castle of the Channonrie as if deserted so that none save the janitor durst 
remain in it; continuing there with a number of armed men sufficient to accomplish their 
treasonable purpose ; exclaiming with terrible voices and noise, and declaring that they would 
slay and burn all within the castle unless the doors were opened to them; and afterwards 
besieging the castle for eight hours or thereby, treasonably seizing the keys and entering by 
dint of superior force, treasonably intromitting with the goods found there, and afterwards 
holding the castle without the King's licence to the above effect for a long time contrary to 
the acts of parliament and for treasonably supplying, fortifying, and holding either in person 
or by their servitors and accomplices the said castle of the Channonrie of Boss against the 
King's authority since the 29th of April, although regularly commanded and required on 
that day to deliver it up to Henry Lord Methven, and to William Lord Ruthven the King's 
treasurer and the tutor of Lord Methven, within 24 hours on pain of treason and lese- 
majesty and for all other crimes. 1 In 1585, as we have seen, King James granted in 
heritage to Henry Lord Methuen, the son and apparent heir of the deceased Lord Henry, 
the temporality of the bishoprick, with the castle, house, and place of Channonrie, formerly 
granted to the deceased lord. 2 The bishop's palace no longer exists, but in 1835 its foun 
dations appear to have been turned up in trenching a place in the Chanonry known as ' the 
precincts.' 3 

In 1854, in the course of some operations on the ruins of the cathedral, there was found 
built into the wall near the high altar a stone sarcophagus divided horizontally into two com 
partments, of which the upper contained the skeleton of a tall man, apparently a bishop, with 
the vestments nearly entire, and at its left side a piece of wood supposed to be the remains of 
a crosier. 4 

In the arches separating the south aisle of the cathedral church from the chancel are two 
monuments, one dated about 1330 and commemorating a countess of Eoss, and the other said 
to be that of Bishop John who died in 1507. 5 

Above the town of Rosemarkie is a circular hill with a flat top named the Courthill, probably 
the seat of the bishop's court. 6 

In the last century were found among the foundations of an old house in the Chanonry coins 
of Robert King of Scots, and in a moor near Rosemarkie coins of Queen Elizabeth, King James 
VI., and King Charles I. 7 



Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xlvi. fol. 53. 2 See p. 570. 5 Neale's Ecclesiological Notes, pp. 53-57 

New Stat. Ace. 6 Old and New Stat Ace. 

Inverness Courier, March, 1854. 7 Old Stat. Ace. 



ARDERSIER.] PAEOCHIALES. 593 



LOCUINETHERETH. 

IN the year 1227 a settlement between the bishops of Moray and Koss about the churches 
of Kyntalargyn and Ardrosser was witnessed and subscribed by Douenald the vicar of 
Locuinethereth. 1 The locality of this church seems to be now unknown. 



KYNTERYTH. 

IN 1549 Queen Mary presented Arthur Hammiltoun to the rectory of Kynteryth in the dio 
cese of Ross, vacant by the decease of Master Peter Sandelandis. 2 This church may be the 
same as Locuinethereth, but there seems to be nothing known of either farther than what is 
here noticed. 



ARDERSIER. 

Ardrosser 3 Ardorsier 4 Arthourseir 5 Ardyrsyir 6 Arthyrsyir 7 
Ardersier 8 Ardnasier. 9 (Map, No. 35.) 

THIS parish is situated in the county of Inverness upon the point or headland which lies on 
the Moray Firth opposite to the Ness or Point of Chanonry. The shore is flat and sandy, 
but diversified with sandy knolls and heathy ridges, morasses, and small lakes, and is generally 
known as the Carse of Ardersier. 10 The rest consists of a sea-terrace in some parts about 300 
feet above the sea, and is in general cultivated. 11 

In 1227 a controversy arose between Andrew bishop of Moray on one side and Robert 
bishop of Ross and his chapter on the other, the former asserting in presence of the Pope's 
delegates, namely, the abbot of Der, and the dean and archdeacon of Aberdene, the right 

1 Regist. Moraviense, p. 82. 6 Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. Blaeu. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxii. fol. 91. ' Circa A. D. 1640. MS. Maps in Adv. Lib. 

3 A. D. 1227. Regist. Morav., p. 82. A. D. 1561- 8 Circa A. D. 1640. Ibid. 

1566. Book of Assumptions. 9 A. D. 1661. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. vii. p. 106. 

4 Circa A. D. 1569. Register of Ministers. 10 New Stat. Ace. Thomson's Map. 
3 A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. " Old and New Stat. Ace. 

VOL. II. 4 F 



594 OKIGINES [ARDEESIER. 

of diocesan over the churches of Gylltalargyn and Ardrosser, and having been put in actual 
possession of the churches a year before causa rei sereande. 1 The controversy was finally 
settled by the advice of the delegates, and with consent of the chapters and clergy of both 
dioceses in the following manner: That the bishops of Moray should possess the church of 
Kyntalargyn as to diocesan right, and the bishops of Eoss should for ever have the church 
of Ardrosser as to all ecclesiastical matters as their predecessors formerly held it. 2 Moreover 
the bishop of Moray for himself and his successors and with the consent of his whole chapter 
renounced all right, if any, which he had or might have in the church of Ardrosser, and all 
action and demand, solemnly promising that neither he nor his successors should afterwards 
claim any right in that church or in any thing belonging to it ; the bishop of Koss for himself 
and his successors and with the consent of his chapter and clergy making a similar renuncia 
tion and promise as to the church of Kyntalargyn. 3 The bishop of Eoss moreover with the 
same consent gave for ever to the cathedral church of Elgyn a stone of wax to be held for 
confraternity and the orisons and other benefits there to be rendered, which stone of wax 
John Byseth and his heirs according to their charter were wont to give to the cathedral 
church of Eos. 4 It was further agreed that, if either of the said churches should attempt to 
contravene the above, it should pay the penalty of 100 sterling to the other which observed 
the agreement, and that the agreement should notwithstanding remain valid. 5 The settlement 
was subscribed by the respective bishops and clergy together with the delegates, and among 
those who subscribed the copy to be kept by the bishop of Moray was Maurice canon of 
Ilosmarkyn and parson of Ardrosser, who subscribed by the hand of his procurator because 
he was blind. 6 At the Reformation the kirk of Ardrosser was part of the prebend of the 
dean of Eos. 7 In 1569, 1571, and 1574 John Smyth was reader at Ardorseir, and in 
1574 Andro Myll was minister there and at several other churches. 8 About the year 1661 
Master Patrick Durhame, late minister at Ardnaseir, was appointed for life to the deanery 
of Ross. 9 

The church stood on the Carse near the bottom of the sea-terrace, where its cemetery may 
still be seen. 10 It was rebuilt with clay in 1766, and about 1790 was ruinous. 11 The present 
church was built in 1802 near the east end of the higher part of the parish. 12 

In 1296 the Master of the Knights Templars in Scotland swore fealty to King Edward I. 
of England, and received from that king among other mandates for restoring the possessions 
of his order one addressed to the sheriff of Invernys (which probably included their lands at 
Ardersier). 13 In 1611 James Lord Torphichen granted the Temple lands of Ardnasier to 
Master Thomas Eollock, who in 1626 granted them to John Campbell. 1 * In the latter year 
John Mackaye of the Tempill Land of Ardincheir granted to Houchone Eose of Kilravok a 

1 Regist. Morav., p. 81. 2 Ibid. 3 Ibid. 10 MS. Maps. Blaeu. Thomson's Map. 

4 Ibid., pp. 81, 82. ' o Ibid., p. 82. 6 Ibid. Old Stat. Ace. 

7 Book of Assumptions. 12 New Stat. Ace. 

" Register of Ministers. Book of Assignations. " Rotuli ScotiiE, vol. i. p. 25. 

9 A eta Parl. Scot., vol. vii. p. 106. " Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. p. 366. 



ARDEBSIEB.] PAKOCHIALES. 595 

receipt for his 'haill vryttis haill and suir as he delyverit thame to him.' 1 In 1661 King 
Charles II. confirmed in favour of Sir Hew Campbell of Calder the grants of the Temple lands 
made in 1611 and 1626, both granters and grantees being then deceased. 2 The preceptory 
or house of the Templars, the ruins of which remained in the beginning of the last century, 
stood at Dalyards. 3 

Between 1561 and 1566 the kirk of Ardrosser, included in the rental of the deanery of Boss, 
was valued yearly at 5 chalders of victual and apparently a sum of money not stated separately 
from the money paid by the other churches held by the dean.* In 1569 and 1571 the reader 
at Ardorseir had for his stipend 20, and in 1574 he had 20 marks and the kirklands. 5 In 
1574 the minister had 80 (the amount of the deanery), the kirklands (probably of Awach), and 
other perquisites. 6 

In the year 1552 Eobert Monro of Fowlis granted a charter at Arthuirsair. 7 In 1556 David 
bishop of Ross, perpetual commendator of Cambuskynneth, with consent of the dean and 
chapter of Eoss, granted to his brother Robert Leslie the lands and barony of Ardroseir, 
the salmon and other fishings of the same, the upper alehouse of Ardroseir and the lower 
alehouse with their crofts and pertinents, and the lands of Wester and Eister Delny (in 
the neighbouring parish of Nairn) ; the grantee paying yearly for Ardroseir 24 marks 
with 8 marks as grassum, 2 marts, 2 muttons, 18 capons, 18 poultry, 8 kids, 160 eggs, 
and 4 bolls of oats for the mails of the upper alehouse 20s. with 6s. 8d. as grassum 
for the mails of the lower alehouse 2 marks with 8s. lid. as grassum, 2 muttons, and 
24 capons and for the fishings 10 marks ; and performing three suits at the three head 
courts held yearly at the chanonry of Ross. 8 In 1557 Queen Mary confirmed the 
grant. 9 Between 1561 and 1566 Henry bishop of Ross enumerates the mairdom of Ardrosser 
among the lands belonging to the bishoprick. 10 In 1570 King James VI., for the good 
service done to his ' guidschir and regent' by Robert Leslie of Arthourseir, granted to 
him for life a yearly pension of 103, 11s. 4d. Scots together with 300 loads of peats 
out of the fruits of the bishoprick of Ros, and as security he granted him the dues of the 
lands and barony of Arthourseir with the fishing of the same, and the dues of the lands of 
Estir Airdrie, in the sheriffdom of Innernes, belonging to the bishoprick as part of its patri 
mony, and formerly let in feuferme to Robert and his heirs for the yearly payment of those 
dues. 11 In 1572 (3 January) the same king granted to the same Robert Leslie in heritage 
the escheat of the goods which belonged to Master Mungo Monypenny dean of Ross, and ((j 
January) confirmed to him the grant of 1570. la In 1575 the son of Robert Leslie sold the 
lands of Ardersier and Delnies to John Campbell of Calder. 13 

1 Kilravock Charters. 8 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 581. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

2 Acta Part. Scot., vol. v. p. 366. vol. xxix. fol. 9. 

3 New Stat. Ace. 9 Ibid. 

4 Book of Assumptions. 10 Book of Assumptions. 

b Register of Ministers. Book of Assignations. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxix. fol. 47. 

6 Book of Assignations. 12 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xl. ff. 42, 43. See above, p. 573. 

7 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxxi. no. 122. 13 Shaw's History of Moray. 



596 ORIGINES [ARDEBSIER. 

Campbeltovvn, lying partly in this parish and partly in Petty, was in 1623 created a 
burgh of barony in favour of John Dow Campbell of Calder, with a fair on 5 July. 1 
It is now a village with about 1000 inhabitants, and has a fair on 12 August called 
Lammas Fair. 2 

Fort George, built in 1748, an irregular polygon with six bastions, and capable of ac 
commodating 2500 soldiers, occupies the extremity of the Point of Ardersier opposite to 
Chanonry. 3 

On the height above Campbeltown is a circular mount about 20 feet high, having a rampart 
of earth and clay 5 feet in height and 120 in circumference. 4 It is known as Cromwell's 
mount, a corruption of Cromal or Tom Mhoit, and was evidently the ancient moothill of the 
barony of Ardersier. 5 

In 1508 King James IV. crossed the ferry of Ardersier on his way to Tain, on which 
occasion he paid 13s. to the ' feryaris.' 6 

Near the march between Ardersier and Nairn is an erect stone 6 feet high, known as the 
Claoch-na-cabbac or Kebbuck-stone, traditionally said to commemorate the death of a chieftain 
who fell on the spot. 7 

On the heath of Balnagown are the remains of an encampment supposed to be Danish, which 
when perfect consisted of two parallel lines of circular mounds, each mound in the one line 
covering the opening between two mounds in the other. 8 

1 New Stat. Ace. 5 Ibid. 

2 Ibid. " Treasurer's Accounts. 

3 New Stat. Ace. and County Maps. 7 Old Stat. Ace. 

4 New Stat. Aee. < New Stat. Ace. 



DORNOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 597 

DORNOCH. 

Durnach 1 Domouch 2 Domoch 3 Dornogh* Dunioch. 5 (Map, No. 1.) 

THIS parish, of which the seaward part is skirted by Loch Fleet and the Little Ferry (Unis) on 
the north, the Dornoch Firth on the east, and the portion of that firth called the Meikle Ferry 
(Portnacultyr) on the south and whose northern extremes touch Loch Buie on the west, and 
the immediate vicinity of the church of Rogart on the east is low, flat, and sandy towards the 
sea, and rises to no great height in the interior, which is traversed by some hilly ranges, and bv 
two valleys named Strathcarnaig and Strathachvaich watered by the streams Carnaig and Evelix. 6 
The original parish church of Dornoch, the date of whose foundation is unknown, was dedi 
cated to Saint Bar, Finbar, or Fymber, a native of Caithness and bishop of Cork, who flourished 
according to some authorities in the sixth century, and according to others in the eleventh. 7 
Saint Duthace, said to have been bishop of Ross during the first half of the thirteenth century, 
was believed to have wrought a miracle at Dornoch on the festival of Saint Fimbar (25 Septem 
ber). 8 During the same period, as will afterwards be seen, Bishop Gilbert (said to have been the 
pupil of Saint Duthace) built the cathedral church, subsequently dedicated to him as Saint 
Gilbert. 9 Whether this erection superseded the church of Saint Bar, neither the charter of 
Bishop Gilbert nor any other record informs us but his festival continued to be held as a 
term day and fair during both the sixteenth and the seventeenth century, and the cemetery 
of Saint Fimber of Dornoch occurs in several bounding charters of the same period. 10 The 
church of Saint Bar existed, whether in ruins or otherwise does not appear, till about the 
beginning of the seventeenth century, when it was taken down or destroyed. 11 

1 A. D. 1223-1245. Sutherland Charters. A. D. 1275. house and lands, and carried off his daughter Helga. 

Sutherland Charters. He was pursued and overtakenbyUlf (apparently on the 

a A. D. 1456. Misc. of Bannatyne Club, vol. iii. coast of Caithness), a sea-fight ensued, and Helg, being 

3 A. D. 1568. Sutherland Charters. A. D. 1569. worsted, threw himself into the sea and swam ashore, 
Sutherland Charters. Register of Ministers. A. D. carrying with him Ulfs daughter. They were kindly 
1574. Book of Assignations. A. D. 1576. Ibid. A. D. received by a poor man named Thorfin, in whose cottage 
1607. Sutherland Charters. they were irregularly married and dwelt for two years. 

4 Circa A. D. 1640. Blaeu. Ulf being dead, they then returned to Orkney; and 

5 A. D. 1641. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. pp. 599, 600. their son Bard, who travelled and acquired great learn- 

6 Old and New Stat. Ace. ing, was afterwards bishop of Ireland, and became 

7 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, pp. 6, 25. famous for his miracles. Orcades, lib. i. c. 10. 
Pennant, vol. iii. p. 361. Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro 8 Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, hyem., fol. Ixvi. 
temp, estiv. fol. cxv. Annals of the Four Masters (trans- 9 Sutherland Charters. Genealogy of the Earls of 
lated by Connellan), p. 180. Keith's Catalogue. Tor- Sutherland, p. 32. 

faeus gives the following story, which he dates about 10 Sutherland Charters. Genealogy of the Earls of 

995, and which bears some resemblance to the legend Sutherland, p. 7. 

of the Aberdeen Breviary. Ulf, surnamed the Bad, an " Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, pp. 6, 25. 
inhabitant of Sandey in Orkney, murdered Harald an Sir Robert Gordon, author of the Genealogy, writing 
inhabitant of Ronaldsha. Helg the son of Harald in in 1030, says of the church that it ' wes of late demo- 
revenge slew Bard the friend of Ulf, plundered Ulfs lislied in the dayes of King James the Sixth.' 
VOL. II. 4 G 



598 ORIGINES [DORSOCH. 

The bishoprick of Caithness appears to have been from its erection co-extensive with the older 
earldom, extending, as recorded in charters of 1476, 1527, and 1567, from Portnacultir to the 
Pentland Firth and from the eastern sea to the western, and thus including the modern counties 
of Caithness and Sutherland. 1 The era of its erection is unknown. 2 The first bishop whose 
name appears in authentic records is Andrew, whose rule extended from the year 1146 at latest 
to the year 1185. 3 Before 1153 King David I. granted to that bishop Hoctor Comon (probably 
the same as Huctherhinche subsequently assigned by Bishop Gilbert to the chantry) free from all 
service except that of the common host.* About the same period Bishop Andrew granted to the 
monks of Dunfermelyn, of which he had been himself a monk, for the weal of the soul of King 
David, his predecessors, and successors, and of his own soul, the church of the Holy Trinity of 
Dunkcld (which he appears to have had from the gift of King David), with all its pertinents, 
namely, Fordouin, Dunmernach, Bendacthin, Cupermaccultin, Inchethurfin, and Chethec. 8 i Be 
tween the years 1160 and 1164 King Malcolm IV. confirmed to the monks of Dunfermelyn the 
same church, to be held by them after the decease of Andrew bishop of Cateneis, and with the 
same pertinents and rights held by him from the gift of King David. 6 Before 1165 Gregory 
bishop of Dunkeld confirmed the same, which he styles in his charter the gift of King Malcolm 
and of Andrew bishop of Katenes. 7 Bishop Gregory's charter is witnessed by Bishop Andrew, 
and by Murethac the clerk of the bishop of Katenes. 8 Before 1181, during the pontificate of 
Alexander III., Harald earl of Catenes and Orkney granted to the see of Rome one penny 
yearly from each inhabited house within the earldom of Catenes, a grant which was witnessed 
by Bishop Andrew and other nobles of the district, and which the bishop had the duty of 
enforcing. 9 Bishop Andrew died at Dunfermelin on 30 December 1185. 10 

John, who succeeded Andrew as bishop of Caithness, witnesses several charters between the 
years 1187 and 1199, in one case along with his two chaplains, each named Alexander. 11 As 
he refused to exact the papal contribution granted by Earl Harald, the latter between 1 198 and 
1202 seems to have sent information to that effect to Pope Innocent III., who thereupon 
commissioned the bishops of Orkney and Boss to compel Bishop John to levy the tax on pain 
of church censure. 12 During the same period Harald the son of Eric Slagbrell (styled Harald 
the younger), having received from Magnus king of Norway the half of Orkney, and from 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vii. no. 393 ; lib. xxi. no. 42. Andree, pp. 128, 129, 131, 133, 139, 144, 147, 149, 184- 
Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. vi. fol. 72; vol. vii. fol. 81. Acta 189, 195, 196, 198, 199, 201-205, 207, 216, 217, 219, 
Parl. Scot., vol. ii. p. 507. Macpherson's Gcog. Illust. 220, 222-225. Regist. Moraviense, pp. 4, 454. Lib. 

2 Keith's Catalogue. Dalrymple's Collections, pp. Eccl.de Scon, pp. 7, 17,19,20,22,23,25,27,33. Regist. 
227, 247. Macpherson's Geog. Illust. Miscellany of de Aberbrothoc, vol. i. pp. 7, 10, 11, 13, 16, 67, 101. 
Bannatyne Club, vol. iii. Bishop Leslie, and after him Chronica de Mailros, p. 93. 

.Sir Robert Gordon, attribute the foundation of this 4 Regist. de Dunfermelyn, pp. 14, 15. 

bishoprick to King Malcolm III., and Sir Robert 5 Ibid., p. 74. 6 Ibid., p. 22. 

gives Saint Bar as first bishop, and Saint William as 7 Ibid., p. 74. 

his successor. Sir James Dalrymple and Mr. Chalmers s Ibid. 

assign the foundation of the bishoprick to King 9 Epist. Innocentii III., lib. i. no. 218. 

David I. in Chronica de Mailros, p. 93. 

3 Regist. de Dunfermelyn, pp. 7, 8, 14, 22, 23, 24, 26, Regist. Morav., p. 6. Regist. de Aberbrothoc. vol. i. 
30, 31, 35. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. pp. 48, 52*, 53*, pp. 17, 99. 

<>4*. Regist. Glasguense, pp. 13, 32. Reg. Prior. S. 12 Epist. Innocentii III., lib. i. no. 218. 



DORNOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 599 

King William the Lion the half of Katanes, and having collected an army in Katanes, sent 
to Earl Harald (called the elder) requesting him to yield the half granted to him by the king. 1 
The earl refused, raised a large army, entered Katanes, defeated and slew the younger Harald, 
and retired to Orkney. 2 King William on learning these things sent an army into Katanes 
under Rognvald Gudrodson king of the Hebrides, who took possession of the whole district, 
and left it under the charge of three prefects. 3 Earl Harald in 1201 returned to Katanes with 
an army, and landing near Thorsa was met by Bishop John then residing at his palace of 
Skarabolstad (Scrabster), and anxious to intercede with the earl for the Katanes men who had 
submitted to the king. 4 The earl at first received him civilly, but then caused him to be 
seized and to have his tongue and eyes cut out. 6 The bishop of Orkney by letter informed 
Pope Innocent III. of the outrage, and of the part acted in it by Lomberd a layman, who 
according to his own account was forced by some of the earl's soldiers to cut out the bishop's 
tongue. 6 That pope in 1202 prescribed for Lomberd the following penance That, barefooted 
and clad only with breeches and a short woollen garment without sleeves, and having his 
tongue projecting and tied with a string bound round his neck, and with rods in his hand, 
lie shoujd in the sight of all walk for fifteen days in succession through his native district, the 
district of the mutilated bishop, and the surrounding country ; that, prostrate on the earth 
before the door of the church, he should cause himself to undergo discipline with the rods he 
carried ; that he should spend each day in silence and fasting till after the evening, and then 
support nature with only bread and water ; that at the end of the fifteen days he should make 
ready to set out for the Holy Land, where he should labour for three years in the service of 
the cross ; that he should never more bear arms against Christians ; and that for two years he 
should fast every Friday on bread and water, unless that abstinence should by the indulgence 
of some discreet bishop be mitigated on account of bodily infirmity or other cause. 7 Bishop 
John appears to have survived the mutilation till the year 1213, in which Adam abbot of 
Melros was elected as his successor. 8 

In 1214 Adam was consecrated bishop of Cathenes by William Maleuicin bishop of Saint 
Andrews. 9 In the same year he presided at the dedication of the church of Saint Mary 
of Hawic. 10 In 1218, in company with Walter bishop of Glasgow and Bricius bishop of 
Moray, he made a pilgrimage to Eome to procure absolution, and in 1219 he returned. 11 
It was probably in one of those years that he witnessed a charter of Bishop Bricius. 12 In 
1218 also he is said to have procured from Pope Honorius III. a confirmation of the erection 

1 Orkneyinga Saga, p. 407. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 38. 6 Epist. Innocentii III., lib. v. no. 77. 7 Ibid. 

2 Ork. Saga, pp. 409, 411. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 38. 8 Chronica de Mailros, p. 114. Tlie Sagas relate that 
1 Ork. Saga, pp. 411, 413. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 38. Bishop John, having been conducted by a woman to the 
* Ork. Saga, p. 415. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 38. Ford. tomb of Saint Trollhaena, had his tongue and eyes mi- 
Scot, lib. viii. c. 62. Ep. Inn. III., lib. v. no. 77. raculously restored. Ork. Saga, p. 415. Torfaeus, lib. 

5 Ibid. The Chronica de Mailros seems to place these i. c. 38. Trollhaena is Triduana of Scotch hagiologists, 

events in 1196 or 1197 Buchanan gives the date 1199. who place her tomb at Restalrig. 

Chron. de Mailros, p. 103. Buch. Hist. lib. vii. c. 49. 9 Chrouica de Mailros, p. 114. 

The date given by Fordun, 1201, seems to be more 10 Ibid., p. 115. 

correct. " Ibid., p. 135. 12 Eegist. Moraviense, p. 62. 



600 ORIGINES [DOHNOCH. 

of the bishoprick. 1 By an old custom a spann of butter for every 20 cows was paid to the 
bishop by the husbandmen. 3 Bishop Adam reduced the number first to 15, then to 12, 
and finally to 10, exacting in every case the spann of butter. 3 In 1222 the Katanes men 
complained to Earl John, who in vain attempted to induce the bishop to be more moderate.* 
While the bishop was at his episcopal manor of Hakirk in Thorsdal (probably at that time 
the episcopal see), in company with Serlo dean of Neubotle his confidential adviser, and 
Kafn the logmadr (one of the prefects appointed by King William), the discontented husband 
men assembled in the vicinity, threatening to use violence, from which Earl John who was 
present seems to have dissuaded them. 5 Eafn's intercession with the bishop had no effect 
the husbandmen advanced to attack the house Serlo came out to meet them, and was 
immediately seized and put to death and, the bishop at last coming out and offering terms 
of agreement, the better part of the populace would have willingly made an arrangement 
with him, but the more violent seized him, dragged him to a hut (or, as some say, his own 
kitchen), and setting fire to it burned him to death. 6 His body was afterwards honourably 
interred in the baptismal church (of Skinnet), and in 1239 was transferred to the episcopal 
see (then at Dornoch). 7 Among the documents found in the king's treasury at Edinburgh 
in 1282 was one entitled ' A quitclaiming of the lands of the bondi of Catanes for the slaughter 
of the bishop.' 8 Earl John, whose only blame seems to have been that after failing in his 
first intercession with the bishop he declined again to interfere, was nevertheless considered 
a partner in the murder, and forfeited his lands, which however were soon afterwards 
restored. 9 

Gilbert de Moravia, a son of the laird of Duffus in Moray, and from 1203 to 1222 arch 
deacon of that diocese, succeeded Bishop Adam in the see of Caithness. 10 He is said by our 
chroniclers to have been present with Bishop Andrew at the council of Northampton in 1176, 
and to have been the Scottish clerk who there asserted the independence of the Scottish 
church. 11 Bulls granted by Popes Clement III. and Celestine HI. between 1187 and 1198 
in favour of that church are said to have been partly the result of his able defence, and to 
have been committed to his keeping by King Alexander II. 12 He afterwards held some office 

1 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 30. chawmyr lay' was also killed; and that the bishop 

2 Ork. Saga, p. 421. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 40. suffered because he refused to lease his teinds to his 

3 Ibid. own men. 

4 Ibid. " Chronica de Mailros, pp. 139, 150. 

5 Ibid. Hakirk was not at that period a parish, the 8 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. p. 4 post pref. 

church being at Skenand (Skinnet), but there seems to 9 Chronica de Mailros, p. 142. Wyntownis Cronykil, 

have been a chapel at Hakirk (afterwards made a book vii. ch. ix. 

parish church), and the name according to some writers 10 Regist. Moraviense, pp. 43, 60-62. Brev. Aberd. 

is translated ' high or principal church.' Prop. SS. pro temp, hyem., f'ol. Ixxxiii. Ford. Scot, 

6 Ork. Saga, pp. 421, 428. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 40. lib. viii. c. 26. Ext. e Var. Cron. Scocie, p. 93. Suther- 
Chronica de Mailros, p. 139. Ford. Scot., lib. ix. c. 37. land Charters. Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, 
Wyntownis Cronykil, book vii. ch. ix. Brev. Aberd. p. 31. Keith's Catalogue. 

Prop. SS. pro temp, hyem., fol. Ixxxiii. Such. Hist., " Forduni Scot., lib. viii. c. 26. Ext. e Var. Cron. 

lib. vii. c. 56. Ant. Celto-Scandicae, pp. 272, 274. Scocie, p. 93. Camerarius, pp. 121, 122. 

Ext. e Var. Cron. Scocie, p. 92. Wyntoun says that a ia Camerarius, pp. 121, 122. Genealogy of the Earhs 

boy who attended the bishop 'the child that in his of Sutherland, p. 31. 



DOENOCH.] PAEOCHIALES. 601 

under that king (variously but erroneously styled chancellor, chamberlain, and treasurer), 
in virtue of which he was empowered to administer the king's affairs in the north, and to 
build, repair, and keep the royal castles and other buildings. 1 In 1225 as bishop he witnessed 
the settlement of a dispute between Andrew bishop of Moray and Robert Hode about the 
manor of Lamanbrid. 2 

Apparently soon after his appointment to the see Bishop Gilbert, on the narrative that in 
the times of his predecessors there was but a single priest ministering in the cathedral church 
both on account of the poverty of the place and by reason of frequent hostilities, and that he 
desired to extend the worship of God in that church, resolved to build a cathedral church 
at his own expense, to dedicate it to the Virgin Mary, and in proportion to his limited means 
to make it conventual. 3 He therefore ordained that in that church there should be ten 
canons constantly ministering to the bishop by themselves or their vicars that the bishop 
should preside as head, five of the others holding the dignities of dean, precentor, chancellor, 
treasurer, and archdeacon, each of whom, as well as the bishop and the abbot of Scon who had 
been appointed a canon in that church, 4 should find a priest as vicar to minister there daily in 
his own absence and that the other three canons should find deacons continually to assist and 
serve the said priests within the church. Having assigned fourteen of the parish churches of his 
diocese for the maintenance of the canons and the lighting of the cathedral church, and having 
reserved six for the use of the bishop, he appointed to each canon his prebend as follows. 5 To 
the dean were assigned the church of Clun with all its fruits, the teindsheaves of the citv of 
Durnach and the town of Ethenboll, with the fourth part of the altarage of Durnach and the 
whole land of Methandurnach to the precentor the church of Crech with its fruits and chapels, 
the teindsheaves of Promci and Auelech, Stradormeli, Askesdale, and Rutheuerchar, the fourth 
part of the altarage of Durnach, and the whole land of Huctherhinche at Durnach to the 
chancellor the church of Rothegorth, the teindsheaves of Scelleboll, namely, of 12 dawaehs, 
and the fourth part of the altarage of Durnach and to the treasurer the church of Larg, 
the teindsheaves of Scitheboll and Sywardhoch, except those before assigned to the precentor 
at Stradormeli belonging to those lands, and the fourth part of the altarage of the church of 
Durnahc with free toft and croft in the city of Durnach to each of those four prebendaries. 
In order the better to secure their residence in the cathedral, there was given them as a common 
church, while resident or while employed in the external business of the church or of the 
bishop, the church of Far, except the tithes and fruits of Helgedall previously assigned by 

1 Ford. Scot., lib. viii. c. 26. Ext. e Var. Cron. Criecli, Rogart, Lairg, Far, Kildonan, and Durness. 
Scocie, p. 93. Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, hyem., in Sutherland ; and Bower, Watten, Skinnet, Olrick, 
fol. Ixxxiii. Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, Dunnet, and Cannisbay, in Caithness. Those re- 
p. 32. Crawfurd's Officers of State, p. 253. Keith's served to the bishop seem to have been Golspie and 
Catalogue. Sir R. Gordon (Genealogy, p. 32) ascribes Loth in Sutherland, Reay in Sutherland and Caitli- 
to him the building of Kildrummy Castle in Aberdeen- ness, and Tlmrso, Wick, and Latlieron in Caithness. 
shire. Lairg at that period included Kdderachillis; Far in- 

2 Regist. Morav., p. 460. 3 Original at Dunrobin. eluded Tongue ; and Skinnet included Halkirk and 
* See KILDONAN post. Spittal. Assynt, the only remaining parish, was pro- 
5 The 14 churches thus assigned to the prebends bably not a distinct parish at the time. See Rental 

were, as will be seen, those of Clyne, Dornoch, of Bishoprick post. 



602 ORIGINES [DOEHOCH. 

the bishop to the church of Ka on account of the nearness of that church to Helgedall and 
the great distance of the church of Far reserving also to the bishop the power of dividing 
the parish of Far into more on account of its diffuse extent. As those prebendaries were 
next after the bishop the chief members of the cathedral, the bishop ordained that they should 
be free from every burden payable to the archdeacon, the officials, and the rural deans, none 
of whom should presume to exercise jurisdiction over them, their households (familias), or 
their chaplains, the correction of their misdemeanours being left to the bishop and chapter. 
To the archdeacon were assigned the churches of Bouer and Watne. The lands of Peth- 
grudi and of the two Herkhenys, with the common pasture of the city of Durnach, were 
assigned in common to the chancellor, treasurer, and archdeacon. The church of Kelduninach 
was assigned as the prebend of the abbot of Scon, who was bound to serve in the cathedral 
church by a competent priest as vicar, and to serve in his prebendal church by a competent 
priest, but not bound to residence or to find a vicar in that church. To the three remaining 
prebends were assigned the parish churches of Olrich, Donotf, and Cananesbi, with the church 
of Scynend as a common church the fruits of the last in case of absence to be applied for 
the work and ornament of the cathedral church, saving for life to the bishop's clerk William 
of Ros 100 shillings formerly assigned to him from that church, and to his chaplain Eudo 
three marks yearly from the same. Tlfe church of Dyrnes was given to find light and incense 
for the cathedral church. To the bishop's vicar in the cathedral were assigned with consent 
of the chapter the teindsheaves of Thoreboll and Kynald, and 20 acres of land at Durnach, 
with toft and croft in that city. To the five prebends above instituted and specified were 
further assigned tofts and crofts in Durnach, in order to deprive them of all excuse for non- 
residence. The prebendaries were to enjoy their benefices freely, saving the episcopal rights 
in their respective churches. The bishop with the consent of the chapter further ordained, 
that the dean should reside at least for the half of every year in the cathedral church, and 
that all the other canons, whether dignified or otherwise, except the abbot of Scon, should 
either together or singly be resident for three months in the year, unless licensed by the 
bishop or chapter, the defaulter to pay 12 pennies for every week of his absence that 
any canon summoned by the bishop or chapter to give his advice and assistance for the 
defence of the church, and neglecting the summons, unless he could plead a canonical excuse, 
should be deprived of his prebendal revenue till he should make condign satisfaction that 
each of the seven priests ministering in the cathedral church should daily perform divine service 
unless canonically prevented and that all the priests and deacons should be daily present 
at every (canonical) hour, unless unwell or licensed by the bishop, or in his absence by the dean 
the absentee otherwise to be punished according to the practice to be instituted in the 
church. The bishop concludes his constitution by praying for peace and eternal glory to 
every faithful canon and vicar, and eternal wrath to the divisive and injurious. He intimates 
his own subscription and seal, and the manual subscriptions of the canons, none of which 
seem to have been appended. 1 

Original at Dunrobin. 



DORNOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 603 

Bishop Gilbert appears to have completed the building of the cathedral. 1 The glass used 
for the windows is said to have been made at Sytheraw (now Ciderhall) a short distance west 
from Dornoch. 2 The bishop had latterly some controversy with William earl of Sutherland 
about the episcopal lands, which was continued by two of his successors. 3 In 1242 he made 
his will, which was extant in 1630. 4 He died in 1245, was afterwards canonised, had his 
festival celebrated on 1 April (the anniversary of the day on which he died), and became the 
patron saint of the church which he built, and of the diocese which he ruled. 5 His relics 
continued to be had in reverence till the eve of the Reformation. 6 

The immediate successor of Saint Gilbert was William, who in 1250 joined with other 
Scottish bishops in addressing a letter to King Alexander III. concerning the liberties of the 
church, and who is said to have died in 1261." He was succeeded by Walter of Baltroddi. 8 
In 1263 among the items of royal revenue accounted for by Laurence le Grant sheriff of 
Innernes were the profits of the justiciar of Caithness, which amounted to 18 shillings, saving 
the bishop's tithe, which was 2 shillings. 9 Bishop Walter died in 1270 or 1271 ; and Nicolas 
abbot of Scone, who was elected his successor, having gone to Rome for consecration, was 
rejected by the pope (Gregory X.), who ordered the chapter to elect another. 10 

The next bishop was Archebald Hayrok (or Heroc), formerly archdeacon of Moray. 11 In 
the year 1275 on the narrative that, after a long controversy between his predecessors 
Gilebert, William, and Walter, on the one part, and William of good memory, and William his 
son, earls of Sutherland, on the other part, about the castle of Sehythebolle with certain 
other lands, namely 6 davachs of Sehythebolle, and 6 davachs of Sytheraw with the ferry, 
and 2 davachs and a half of Miggewet, Swerdisdale, Creych with the fishing of the Bunnach, 
Cuttheldawach, 2 davachs of Mouimor, 2 davachs of Awelec, 3 davachs of Promsy, a davach 
of Rowecherchar, 3 quarters of Haskesdale, half a davach of Hacchencossy, 3 davachs of 
Thorbolle, 2 davachs of Kynalde, and 4 davachs of Largge, in which lands and castle the 
bishop's said predecessors claimed right from the said earls in name of the church of Cathanes ; 
and after the prolongation of the controversy to the no small expense of the church and of 
the earls down to the time of bishop Archebald and of William the son of the said deceased 
earl; at length, by the interposition of certain prelates and noblemen compassionating the 
straits of the church of Cathanes, the said earl by the advice of those prelates and other 
trustworthy persons granted to that church the castle of Sehythebolle with six davachs of land 
adjacent to it, 6 davachs of Sytheraw with the ferry, 2 davachs and a half of Miggeweth, 
Swerdel, and Creych, with the fishing of the Bunnach, and 2 davachs of Mouimor, to be held 

1 Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp, hy em., fol. Ixxxiv. " ActaParl. Scot., vol.i. p. 83.* Sutherland Charters. 
Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, pp. 6, 31. Keith's Catalogue. Rites of Durham, p. 133. 

2 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, pp. 6, 31. 8 Sutherland Charters. Hay's Scotia Sacra. Keith's 

3 Sutherland Charters. Catalogue. 

4 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 32. 9 Compota Camerar, vol. i. pp. 21,* 31.* 

5 Ibid., pp. 31, 32. Brev. Aberd. Prop. SS. pro temp. 10 Scotia Sacra. Keith's Catalogue. Genealogy of the 
hyem., fol. Ixxxiv. Camerarius, p. 121. Earls of Sutherland, p. 35. 

6 Protocol Book of David Seatton (at Aberdeen). " Regist. Moraviense, pp. 135, 279. Keith's Cata- 
See post. logue. 



604 OEIGINES [DORNOCH. 

perpetually without any controversy on the part of the earl or his heirs, saving the forinsec 
service of the king ; and that the rest of the land, namely, 2 davachs of Awelech, 3 davachs 
of Promsy, a davach of Eutherhard, 3 quarters of Haskesdale, half a davach of Hachencosse, 
3 davachs of Thorebol, 2 davachs of Kynalde, 4 davachs of Largge) and the davach of Cutthel- 
dawach, was freely given over by the bishop and chapter to the earl and his heirs Bishop 
Archebald, in order more firmly to secure the privilege of his church with respect to the said 
lands, and for the benefits conferred on him by the earl, with the consent of the chapter 
granted to the earl in heritage a davach of Owenes of the value of half a mark, and the right 
of presenting to the bishop a chaplain to celebrate perpetually in the church of Durnach at 
the altar of Saint James for the souls of the earl, his predecessors, and his successors ; assign 
ing to the chaplain for his maintenance 5 marks yearly de bonis episcopalibus, namely of the 
formes of his town of Durnach, to be paid by the hands of his bailies at the feasts of Saint 
Martin in winter and of Pentecost, and promising to grant to the earl every security which he 
and his council might please to demand. 1 To the above agreement, made in the cathedral church, 
were appended on one part the seals of the bishop, dean, archdeacon, precentor, and chancellor, 
and on the other those of the earl, William de Monte Alto, Sir Andrew of Moray, Sir Alexander 
of Moray, and Sir David of Innerlunan. 2 Bishop Archebald appears to have died in 1288. 3 
In 1290 (17 March) Alayn [of St. Edmund] bishop of Catenes was one of several bishops and 
others who in the name of the community of Scotland addressed a letter to Edward I. king of 
England proposing marriage between the Maid of Norway and his son Prince Edward. 4 The 
same bishop was afterwards associated with others in negotiating that marriage, which, as is well 
known, was prevented only by the death of the Maid of Norway. 5 In 1291 (12 June, die Martis 
in crastino festi Sancti Barnabae apostoli), in the presence of Sir Robert of Brus, John of Balliol, 
and others claiming right to the crown of Scotland, and of William bishop of Saint Andrews, 
Robert bishop of Glascu, Sir John Comyn, and Sir James Stewart, wardens of that kingdom, 
and of other nobles and prelates both of Scotland and of England, assembled on a certain green 
opposite the castle of Norham on the north side of the river of Twede in the parish of Upset- 
lington in the diocese of Saint Andrews, Alan bishop of Cathanes, created chancellor of the 
kingdom of Scotland by the king of England, came and received the common seal of Scotland 
(sigillwn ad regimen Scocie deputatum) delivered to him in the name of that king, and seeing and 
kissing the holy gospels gave his bodily oath that he would faithfully hold the office of chancellor 
according to the laws and customs of the kingdom of Scotland, that he \vould faithfully obey in 
that office the king of England as superior and immediate lord of that kingdom, and would do 
full justice to every one in that kingdom in every thing touching his said office. 6 At the same 
time Sir Walter of Amundesham (St. Edmund ?) clerk and associated with the bishop of Cathanes 

1 Sutherland Charters. asserted by Keith; or that he was an Englishman, 

- Ibid. which Keith both asserts and doubts. 

< Keith's Catalogue. Priory of Finchale,pp. 190, 191. 5 Rymer, vol. ii. pp. 488, 1090. Hailes' Annals ad 

' A eta Parl. Scot., vol. i. p. 85. Rymer, vol. ii. pp. annum 1290. 

471, 472. There is no evidence that Alan was ap- 6 Ragman Rolls, pp. 6, 7. Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. 

pointed by King Edward or through his influence, as p. 2. 



DORXOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 605 

in the office of chancellor gave a similar oath. 1 The wardens, claimants, and others, then went 
to the king in the castle of Norharn, and treated of the above and other matters. 2 In the same 
year the same bishop was witness to the oath of fealty given by various persons to the king of 
England, and had various mandates addressed to him by that king. 3 In the same year (28 June) 
King Edward, on the narrative that he had as above appointed Bishop Alan chancellor, and 
Walter of Agmodesham his associate, ordered Alexander of Balliol his chamberlain of Scotland 
to pay every four weeks from his receipts as chamberlain 20 marks to the bishop and 10 marks to 
his associate as their salaries from 12 June till another arrangement should be made. 4 On 12 
August the same king, on the narrative that the pope (Nicholas IV.) had granted to him the 
tithe of all ecclesiastical goods within the kingdom of Scotland as a subsidy for the Holy Land, 
and had appointed the bishop of Carlisle and Alan bishop of Cathenes collectors of the same, 
and that he had taken under his special protection those bishops, their substitutes, men, lands, 
revenues, and possessions, ordered his bailies and others of Scotland to afford all protection and 
assistance to them in making that collection. 5 On 14 August he ordered the bishop as chancellor 
to cause the bishop of Carlisle and himself to have the king's letters of protection under the seal 
of Scotland while engaged in the same collection. 6 On 17 August, after the chancellor and his 
assistant had received 8 weeks payment (a die Martis post festum Sancti Barnabae usque ad diem 
Martis proximam post festum Sancti Oswaldi regis et martiris, from 12 June to 7 August) at the 
appointed rate of 20 and 10 marks respectively for 4 weeks, King Edward, considering that such 
pay was not sufficient for their maintenance, ordered that from the latter date the bishop should 
receive a mark daily till another arrangement should be made that the chamberlain should pay 
at the same rate to the bishop as the attorney of Walter of Agmodesham the arrears of his pay 
from 7 to 16 August (a die Martis post festum Sancti Oswaldi usque ad diem Jovis in crastino 
festi Assumptions Beatce Marice) and that he should also give to the bishop beforehand 8 weeks 
payment at the rate of a mark per day from 7 August, and repeat the same payment at the end 
of every 8 weeks while the bishop held the office of chancellor until the king should otherwise 
ordain. 7 At the same time he authorised the chancellor, as he had then no assistant, to use the 
seal of Scotland in sealing briefs of the chancellary till the king should appoint an assistant. 8 
On 18 August King Edward ordered the bishop to direct letters under the seal of Scotland to 
Simon Fresel keeper of the forest of Selekirk, commanding him to give to various persons a 
number of stags from that forest, and among these ten to the bishop himself. 9 On the same day 
he appointed as assistant chancellor Master Adam of Bodyndon clerk, and ordered the chamber 
lain to pay him as his fee from 1 9 August (a die Dominica proximo, post festum Assumptionis 
Beatce Marios proxime preteritum) one mark per day every 8 weeks in advance till farther orders. 10 
On 22 September the same king commanded the sheriffs of Forfare and Edenburgh to satisfy the 
chancellor and his assistant of their expenses in advance from the issues of their (the sheriffs') 

1 Ragman Rolls, p. 7. 2 Ibid. * Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 2. 

3 Ibid., pp. 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 20, 21. Rotuli 5 Kot. Scot., vol. i. p. 3. 6 Ibid., p. 4. 

Scotiae, vol. i. pp. 2, 3, 4, 5. Acta Parl. Scot, vol. i. 7 Ibid- 8 Ibid, 

p. 5 post pref. 3 Ibid., pp. 4, 5. lu Ibid., p. 5. 

VOL. II. 4 H 



COG OKIGINES [DOKNOCH. 

bailiary according to the king's grant. 1 On 26 October he ordered Alexander Comyn his keeper 
of the forest of Ternway in Moray to give Bishop Alan chancellor of Scotland 40 oaks from that 
forest suitable for material for the fabrick of the cathedral church of Catanes, which the king had 
granted to the bishop for the souls of Alexander king of Scotland of good memory last 
deceased, and of the deceased Margaret queen of Scotland the consort of King Alexander and 
the sister of King Edward. 2 On 12 December the king of England commanded Alexander of 
Balliol chamberlain of Scotland to pay to Master Adam of Botingdon subchancellor of that 
kingdom his fee and the arrears of the same, and also his fee as vice-chancellor, which office he 
had held by the appointment of the nobles and chiefs of Scotland since the death of Alan bishop 
of Catanes of good memory, and to pay him his fee while he held the office by the same appoint 
ment till the king should come into those parts or otherwise order in the matter. 3 In 1292 
(8 January) King Edward, desiring, on account of the faithful obedience which the deceased 
Alan of good memory bishop of Cathenes and chancellor of Scotland had paid him during his 
life, to show special respect to the deceased, granted that all the goods and cattle which belonged 
to the bishop within Scotland at his death, and which had since according to the custom of 
Scotland been seized in the king's hands, should be delivered to the prior of Coldingham and 
Master Adam of Saint Edmund parson of the church of Lastalrik brother of the deceased bishop, 
to be distributed by them as they might see fit at the sight and ordination of one whom the 
bishop of Durham should appoint to act for him before the king. 4 He therefore commanded 
William of Dunfrcs then holding the office of chancellor in Scotland to direct briefs under tin- 
seal of Scotland to those in whose hands the goods and cattle of the bishop were, that they 
should deliver them to the said prior and the said Adam to compel them to this, if necessary 
and to issue letters of protection and safe conduct in forma capelle, to last for a year, in favour 
of the said Adam and his attendants while settling the affairs of the deceased bishop in those 
parts. 5 On 14 January the same king commanded Barachius Gerardi of Florence, Revnerus 
Bollitoni, aiid their associates de societate Pullicum et Lamberinorum dwelling in England and in 
Scotland, on account of the security which they had given to the king in England and to Brian 
Fitz Alan in his name in the parts of Scotland touching the pence and other goods of the 
deceased Alan bishop of Cathenes then in their hands to be kept for the king's use, to deliver 
those pence and goods to the prior of Coldingham and to the bishop's brother Master Adam of 
Saint Edmund, to be distributed as above for the soul of the deceased. 6 On 15 January the 
king ordered that the arrears of the deceased bishop's fee as chancellor should be paid to the 
same persons for the same purpose. 7 On 20 January he ordered William bishop of Saint 
Andrews and Robert bishop of Glascu to commit the cure of the bishoprick of Catcnes, vacant 
by the death of Bishop Alan, to some clerk of those parts in the king's allegiance, who should 
be found sufficiently qualified for the office according to the custom in those parts. 8 



1 Rot. Scot., vol. i. p. 5. 2 Ibid., pp. o, (!. ' Rot. Scot., \ 

' Ibid., p. 0. It thus appears that Bishop Alan died 5 Ibid, 

between 20 October and 12 December 1201, not in " Ibid., pp. 6, 

1292 as stated by Cnuvt'urd and Keith. " Ibid., p. 7. 



Rot. Scot., vol. i. p. 6. 

Ibid. 



DOBXOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 607 

The fulfilment of King Edward's mandate is not on record, and we have no authentic notice 
of a bishop of Caithness from the death of Bishop Alan in 1291 till the year 1310, in which 
Ferchard Belegaumbe or Belerambe bishop of Cathenes joined with certain other prelates in 
acknowledging Robert Bruce as king of Scotland. 1 In 1312 the same bishop appended his 
seal to King Robert's confirmation of the treaty between King Alexander III. and Magnus oi' 
Norway regarding the Isles of Scotland, and was one of those appointed to give oath to that 
confirmation in the king's name. 2 He again appears in record in 1321, and is said to have 
died in 1328. 3 

Between 1306 and 1329 King Robert Bruce granted a charter styled Carte Beate Marie 
et Sancti Gilberti de DornocJie, of which we have no particular account, but which from its 
title appears to have been a confirmation of the charter of Bishop Gilbert. 4 In 1328 Sir 
Robert of Peblis chamberlain of Scotland accounted to the king for 233, 6s. 8d. of the issues 
of the bishoprick of Caithness during the vacancy of the see for the sum of 50 shillings paid to 
the earl of Suthirland for the keeping (custodia) of that bishoprick since the term of Martinmas 
preceding and also for the sum of 8 paid to Herman for his service in that bishoprick while 
in the king's hands. 5 In 1329 the abbot of Dunfermline, depositary of the money ordained 
pro pace, accounted to the same king for 64 received from the bishoprick of Caithness. 6 In 
1342 Sir John Marr clericus probationis received no salary for one term because he had been 
appointed to a certain church in Caithness. 7 In 1368 the chamberlain of King David II. 
claimed the sum of 33 shillings and 4 pence as paid by him from the burgh fermes of Aberdeen 
to the bishop elect of Caithness in name of the church of Saint Gilbert of Caithness, by 
appointment of the chapter and confirmation of the king which church used to receive 
yearly 5 marks. 8 

In the year 1455, by a deed dated in the chapterhouse at Dornoch, William bishop oi 
Caithness, for the defence of his churches and churchlands both in Caithness and in Suthirland, 
with the consent of the dean and chapter granted to his brother-german Gilbert Mudy and 
two lawful heirs the keeping of his castles of Scrabestoun (Scrabster in Thurso) and Skelbole, 
and of the surrounding lands, for which keeping, to be made at the expense of the church of 
Caithness, he leased to Gilbert and his two heirs 10 marklands in Caithness, namely, 9 penny- 
lands in the territory and lordship of Weke, a markland of Alterwelle, 20 shillinglands 
of Stroma, and 10 shillinglands of Dorrary. 9 In 1456 Alexander Sutherland of Dunbeath 
in his will ordained 30 trentals to be said for his soul, four of which were to be said in 
Dornouch and bequeathed to the bishop of Caithness for the repair of Saint Gilbert's 
church all the fee due to him by the bishop since his consecration to office, except 40, and to 
the same to sing for his soul and to confirm his testament 20. 10 Between 1458 and 1464 Pope 
Pius II., in honour of God, the Virgin Mary, and Saint Gilbert the confessor and patron of the 

1 Keith's Catalogue. Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. p. 100. 5 Compota Camerar., vol. i. pp. 22, 24, 26. 

- Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. pp. 103, 104. 6 Ibid., p. 58. " Ibid., p. 282. 

3 Ibid., p. 119. Keith's Catalogue. s Ibid., p. 487. 9 Reg. Mag., lib. viii. no. 123. 

4 Kob. Index, p. 16, nn. 3, 6. See ante, pp. 601, 602. ''> Miscellany of Bamiatyne Club, vol. iii. 



608 OEIGINES [DORNOCH. 

cathedral church of Cathanes, and for certain good and reasonable causes inserted at length 
in his bull, of new erected a certain sacred immunity within bounds extending for three miles 
on every side around the said cathedral church and marked with the sign of the holy cross. 1 
In 1464 King James III., at the pious and just request of his counsellor William bishop of 
Cathanes and his clergy, and desiring to sanction and defend the said sacred immunity, com 
manded all his liege subjects and officers to preserve the same immunity inviolate under all 
pain which they might incur towards his royal majesty and that of his successors. 2 In 1478 
the same king confirmed Bishop William's grant of 1455. 3 

The death of that bishop does not appear in record and one named Prosper is said to have 
been elected as his successor, and to have resigned in favour of John Sinclair, who appears never 
to have been consecrated. 4 There is said to have then occurred a vacancy of 24 years, during 
which the affairs of the see were administered by Adam Gordon dean and vicar general, and 
at the end of which Andrew Stewart, afterwards commendator of Kelso and Feme, was 
appointed bishop. 5 Of the beginning or end of that vacancy we are not informed but Sir 
Donald Kos was dean of Caithness in 1487, and the see was certainly vacant in June 1494, 
and in August 1497. 6 

Andrew Stewart was bishop at least as early as 1504. 7 In 1509 he was one of the curators 
appointed in the case of Alexander Sutherland a claimant of the earldom of that name. 8 In 
1511 he was appointed the king's treasurer, and in 1517 or 1518 he died. 9 

He was succeeded by his namesake Andrew Stewart the son of John earl of Athole, of 
whose rule nothing remarkable is recorded except the murder of the laird of Duffus by the 
Clangun at his instigation, on which occasion, says Sir Robert Gordon, ' the haill dyocie of 
Catteynes wes in a tumult.' 10 Andrew Stewart was bishop from 1518 to 1542, and apparently 
died illegitimate and intestate. 11 

His successor was Robert Stewart brother of Mathew earl of Lennox, who is affirmed never 
to have been in priest's orders. 12 In 1544 he is styled bishop elect and confirmed, and in the 
same year one of his charters given at the cathedral church is witnessed by his brother Mathew 
earl of Leuenax Lord Dernele. 18 In that year the bishop elect took part in the rebellion 
of his brother the earl, and passed with him into England to the court of King Henry VIII., 
and on that account forfeited his bishoprick. 14 Alexander Gordon, the brother of George 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. vi. no. 18. 6 Sutherland Charters. 

2 Ibid. The charter of King James is dated 14 9 Crawfurd's Officers of State. Calendar of Fearn. 
August 1464. Keith erroneously places the bishop's Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 93. 

death in 1460. 10 Keith's Catalogue. Genealogy of the Earls of 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. viii. no. 123. Sutherland, p. 102. Pitcairn's Crim. Trials, vol. i. 

4 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 104. p. 149*. 

Keith's Catalogue. 5 Ibid. " Keith's Catalogue. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xix. fol. 48. 

6 Sutherland Charters. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. x. no. In the latter authority he is erroneously named James. 
109. Acta Dom. Cone., pp. 334, 341. Reg. Sec. Sip;., i2 Keith's Catalogue. Gregory's Highlands and Isles, 
vol. i. ff. 13, 16. Keith says that Andrew Stewart was p. 175. Reg. Sec. Sip;., vol. xix. if. 8, 29. 

bishop of Caithness in 1490. u Sutherland Charters. 

7 Sutherland Charters. Crawfurd's Officers of State. 14 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xix. ff. 8, 29. Genealogy of the 
Keith's Catalogue. Earls of Sutherland, p. 111. Keith's Catalogue. 



DORNOCH.J PAROCHIALES. 609 

earl of Huntly, was nominated in his stead. 1 During die absence of Robert Stewart in 
England (apparently in the autumn of 1544) George earl of Caithness and Donald M'Kv of 
Far seized the lands and rents of the bishopriek in his name, and occupied the castles 
of Skibo and Scrabster. 2 In 1545 (23 April), in presence of John earl of Sutherland, Thomas 
Murray precentor of Caithness, Thomas Stewart treasurer of the same, Duncan Chalmer 
chancellor of Ross, and Paul Freser pensionary of the deanery of Ross, in the chapterhouse 
of the cathedral church of Caithness, John Gray of Kilmaly swore on the relics of Saint 
Gilbert that he was innocent of the coming of the servants and accomplices of Donald M'Ky 
of Far within the bounds of the earldom of Sutherland, and of the depredation and slaughter 
committed by them therein the same John Gray and John Matheson chancellor of Caithness 
gave their great oath on the same relics to be faithful to the earl of Sutherland and Murquhard 
Murray in Pronsi and Walter Murray in Auchflo deponed on their oath, touching the same 
relics, that in riding with their accomplices in the month of October last to the harbour of 
Unis they in no wise intended the hurt of Hugh Kennedy of Girvane Mains. 3 In the same 
year (28 April) Queen Mary granted to Sir James Dempstar the fermes and dues of the lands 
and baronies of the bishopriek of Caitnes, which were in the queen's hands by reason of the 
escheat of Robert bishop elect for passing to England in time of war without the queen's license. 4 
In the same year (apparently between 28 April and 6 August) the bishop elect was despatched 
by his brother from England to induce the constable of Dunbarton castle to yield it to King 
Henrv. 5 It is said that an offer of restoration to his bishopriek led him to join the constable 
in yielding the castle to the Regent Arran. 6 On 6 August Queen Mary granted to the bishop 
elect a remission for his treasonable conduct in passing to England and assisting the queen's 
enemies there, and for all other actions preceding that date, except the prosecution of his 
cause before the judge spiritual to the effect that he might come to Saint Andrews or else 
where with four servants to answer to a summons of deprivation from his benefices before the 
judges appointed by the pope the remission 'to indure quhill the end of the pley and ane 
moneth thareftir.' 7 On 23 September the same queen granted to Master Alexander Gordoun 
postulate of Cathnes all the goods and the arrears of the pension of the bishopriek since the 
provision thereof, which belonged to the deceased James (Andrew) Stewart, who died illegi 
timate and intestate. 8 In 1547 the queen granted a letter of protection to the same Master 
Alexander, still styled postulate of Cathnes, and to his men, tenants, and servants of the 
temporality of the bishopriek. 9 In 1548 Queen Mary granted to Lauchlane M'Kintoische 
the escheat of the goods of three brothers named Thomassoun dwelling within the barony of 
Skebo, forfeited for default of finding surety to answer for slaughtering Lauchlane's servants. 10 

1 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 111. Reg. 5 Gregory's Highlands and Isles, p. 175. 
Sec. Sig., vol. xix. fol. 48 ; vol. xxi. fol. 32. Pitcairn's 6 Ibid., p. 176. 

Crim. Trials, vol. i. p. 337. 7 Reg- Sec. Sig., vol. six. fol. 29. Keith, apparently 

2 Genealogy of theEarlsof Sutherland, p. 111. Pro- without foundation, says that Robert Stewart was 
tocol Book of David Seatton among the records of obliged to abscond for 22 years. 

Aberdeen. 8 Ibid., vol. xix. fol. 48. 

3 Protocol Book of David Seatton. 9 Ibid., vol. xxi. fol. 32. 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xix. fol. 8. 10 Ibid., vol. xxxii. fol. H2. 



610 OEIGINES [DOBNOCH. 

In the same year Eobert bishop elect of Caithness, Sir John Mathesoun chancellor of Caithness, 
Hercules Barculay rector of Cannisby, and others, found surety to appear before the civil court 
to answer for taking and detaining from Master Alexander Gordoun postulate of Caithness 
the house and place of Scrabister, for seizing on the fruits of the bishoprick, and for other 
crimes. 1 George earl of Caithness and Donald M'Ky of Far, who had seized on the revenues 
of the bishoprick in the absence of Kobert Stewart, refused on his return to restore them, but 
were reduced to submission by George earl of Huntly and John earl of Sutherland, ' by 
which meanes,' says Sir Kobert Gordon, ' the dyocie of Catteynes wes for some years in peace 
and quietnes.' 2 ' Thus,' adds Sir Kobert, ' wes Bishop Robert Stuart repossessed in his owne 
bishoprick.' 3 In 1550 and for some years following Robert Stewart in his charters styles 
himself either bishop or bishop elect and confirmed, and thereafter bishop of Cathanes. 4 In 
155.3 he granted to John earl of Sutherland the hereditary bailiary of all the lands, bounds, 
' roumes,' and possessions of the bishoprick. 5 In 1557, with the consent of the dean and 
chapter, for the augmentation of his rental by the sum of 3 Scots, for large sums of money 
paid to him beforehand and converted to his own use and especially to the repair of the 
cathedral church, for the earl's defence of the canons and other ecclesiastical persons, and for 
his other good services, Bishop Robert granted to John earl of Suthirland and Elenour 
Stewart countess of Errol his wife, and to the heirs got between them, with remainder to the 
earl's nearest heirs whomsoever, the following lands and other subjects within the bounds of 
Suthirland and Cathanes, and in the sheriffdom of Innernys, namely, the lands of Westir Skebo, 
Sythera, Vilest, Ardalles, Ferretoun with the boat and ferry, Dawachfyn, Drumdewane, and 
Auchiveyauch with its pendicles called Auchegormolaye and Auchenecolas ; the mill of Skebo ; 
the palace of Dornoch ; the lands of Force with the mill and salmon fishing ; Ballze ; Stam- 
huster ; the 10 pennylands of Weik ; Canzeouchquyis ; Bischopisquyis ; North Killummister ; 
South Killummister ; the mill of Wyndeles, with the 3 lie ottummis of land in Myrelandnorne 
then in the hands of Master Thomas Brody pensionary of Wattin ; the mill of Lythe with the 
multures ; the 9| pennylands of Scrabustar with the fortalice or castle ; the lands not named 
of John M'Ewin and William Randelstoun, except the crofts of Scrabustar ; with the fourth 
part of the salmon fishing of the water of Thurso, and the whole lands, crofts, and acres, of 
the city of Dornoch which according to the bishop's rental paid yearly as follows, namely, 
Westir Skebo, 8 bolls of ferme victual and 4 bolls of dry multure at 10s. per boll, 2 bolls of 
horse corn at 5s., 2 dozen poultry at 3d. each, 4 Scots of ferme, and 16s. grassum, in all 
11, 12s.; Sythera, the same; Vilest, 4 bolls ferme victual and 2 bolls dry multure at 10s., 
1 boll of horse corn at 5s., 1 dozen poultry at 3d. each, 40s. ferme, and 8s. grassum, in all 
5, 16s. ; Ardellis, the same ; Ferretoun with the boat and ferry, 2 bolls ferme and 1 boll 
dry multure at 10s., 2 firlots of horse corn at 2s. 6d. (in all), 6 poultry at 3d. each, 40s. 
ferme, and 4s. grassum, in all 3, 18s. ; Aucheveyich with its pertinents Auchegormula 

1 Pitcairn's Crim. Trials, vol. i. p. 337*. 3 Ibid., p. 112. These events seem to have occurred 

2 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, pp. Ill, between 1545 and 1550. 

112. " Sutherland Charters. ' Ibid. 



DOKSOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 611 

and Auchenicolas, 20s. Scots ; Dawauclifin, 40s. Scots ; Drumdewanc, 53s. 4d. Scots ; Mill 
of Skebo, 4 ; Force with the mill and salmon fishing, 4 chalders 8 bolls ferme at 8s. 
4d., 6 bolls horse corn at 4s. 2d., 96 sheaves of oats at Id., 96 lie hallowis of stray 
at 1-Jd., 18s. grassum, 3 grassum marts at 30s. each, 2 dozen poultry with 3 halkhennis 
at 2d. each, 6s. plewch siluir, 12d. huik siluir, in all 38, 4s. 6d. ; Ballze, 20s. ferme, 
20s. grassum, 4s. pleuch siluir, 1 boll horse corn at 4s. 2d., 32 sheaves of oats at Id., 
32 hallowis of stray (sarcinas straminum) at l^d., 4 halkhennis at 2d., and 16d. huik 
siluer, in all 56s. lOd. ; Stambustar, 40s. ferme, 8 rams at 3s. each, 16 poultry and 4 halk 
hennis at 2d., 4 bolls of horse corn at 4s. 2d., 64 sheaves of oats at Id., 64 hallowis of 
stray at l^d., 8s. pleuch siluer, 3 grassum marts at 30s., 16d. huik siluer, in all 9, 16s. 8d. ; 
the 10 pennylands of Weik, 6, 13s. 4d. ferme, 3, 6s. 8d. grassum, 2 onset martis (martas 
emptas) at 16s. 8d., 20 capons at 6d., 20 poultry and 5 halkhennis at 2d., 5 bolls horse corn 
at 4s. 2d., 80 sheaves of oats at Id., 80 hallous of stray at l^d., 16d. huik siluir, and 10s. 
pleuch siluir, in all 14, 16s. 4d. ; Kennochquyis, 20s. ; Bischopisquyis, 10s. ; Northkilmister, 
6 ferme, 6 grassum, 9 bolls horse corn at 4s. 2d., 144 sheaves of oats at Id., 144 hallowis 
of stray at lid., 36 capons at 6d., 36 poultry and 6 halkhennis at 2d., 12s. pleuch siluer, 
2s. huik siluer, 3 vnset martis at 16s. 8d., in all 19, 16s. 6d. ; Southkilmistcr, the same, 
except the pleuch siluer 15s. 9d., making the whole 20, Os. 3d. ; the mill of Wyndeles. 
12 bolls of victual at 8s. 4d., in all 5 Scots ; the 3 lie ottummis, 6d. ; the mill of Lythmoir, 
1 .5 bolls victual at 8s. 4d., or 6, 5s. ; the 9 pennylands of Scrabustar with the castle, 
6, 6s. 8d. ferme, 12, 13s. 4d. grassum, 76 poultry and 8 hens at 2d., 9^ bolls of horse 
corn at 4s. 2d., 152 sheaves of oats at Id., 152 hallowis of stray at Hd., 20s. pleuch siluer, 
2s. 2d. huik siluer, 3 vnset martis at 16s. 8d., in all, 26, 17s. 6d. : the crofts of Scrabustar, 
10s. ; the fourth of the salmon fishing of the water of Thurso, 13, 6s. 8d. ; the tofts and 
crofts of the city of Dornoch with the palace and pertinents, formerly paying nil, 10 Scots ; 
the getting, carrying away, and building of peats, 8 ; the ariages and carriages of all the 
above lands and other subjects, 5; in all 227, 11s. 4d. of old ferme the grantee paying 
that sum and 3 Scots in augmentation. 1 The bishop also appointed the earl and his heirs 
hereditary constables of the castle of Scrabustar and the palace of Dornoch, situated among 
the wild and uncivilised Scots and in a wintry region, granting them also the lands of Scra 
bustar with the crofts extending yearly to 27, 12s. lid., and the lands, crofts, and acres 
of the city of Doruoch extending yearly to 10, in all 37, 12s. lid., for their expenses in 
maintaining and keeping the said castle and palace, to be built and furnished by the bishop 
at his own expense while remaining there ordaining that seisin for the whole lands and 
other subjects granted should be taken at the castle and palace. 2 In 1559 Bishop Eobert 
granted to the same earl and countess and their heirs as in 1557, for certain sums of money 

1 Sutherland Charters. A quoyland or mMirek ' is peece land whichc \ves quoyland, but now inclosed 

ane peece of land newly win without the dykis' within the dykis.' See Petorkin's Rentals of Orkney, 

that is, a piece of land newly improved and not yet no. ii. p. 2. 

enclosed. A tumall (perhaps the same as ottum) ' is ane 2 Sutherland Charters. 



IH2 OEIGINES [DORNOCII. 

and other favours, tlie following lands with the mills, tithes, and other pertinents, namely, 
Gauldwale, Kauldale, Crannega, Borrole, Slanys, Astlairmoir, Astlairbeg, Sandwat, Carraga- 
wyfe or Carragawow, Carramannycht, with the waters of Awmagarrone and Sandwat, with 
the fishings, mills, and alehouses of the same, the island and lands of Hoa, the half of the 
water and fishing of Laxfuird, the fishing of Ardwirnes with the mill and the fishing of the 
crwis of the same, lying in Strathnavar ; and the lands of Skaile, Eegeboile, Dorare, Wlgrame- 
moir, Wlgramebeg, Subambuster, Halkryk with the mill, alehouse, and fishing of the crwis, 
Westirdale, Eisterdale, Thormeskeyth or Thormesdaill, Meremichaelis, Deren, Alterwall, 3^ 
pennylands of Stanthestell, lying in Cathanes ; all in the sheriffdom of Innernes which 
lands of Gauldwall, Kauldwall, Crannega, Borrole, Slanys, Astlairmoir, Astlairbeg, Sandwat, 
Carregawyf or Carregawow. Carremannycht, together with the water of Amagarrone, the 
water of Sandwat with the fishings, the island of Hoa, the half of the water and fishing of 
Laxfurde, the whole water and fishing of Ardwirnes, with the mills, alehouses, teindsheaves, 
and other pertinents, together with the teindsheaves of the whole parish of Ardwirnes, which 
were never separated from the trunk (a trunco) of the said towns and lands and their prin 
cipal fruits, with their grassums, fermes, and other dues and services, extended in the bishop's 
rental to the sum of 81, Gs. 8d. Scots old ferme ; the lands of Skaile and Eegeboill extend 
ing to 6 Scots ; the lands of Dorarie, 20s. ferme and 20s. grassum, in all 40s. old ferme ; 
the lands of Mekle Wlgrame, 24 bolls victual at 8s. 4d., 3 gersum martis at 30s., 3 bolls of 
horse corn at 4s. 2d., 48 sheaves of oats at Id., 48 hallowis of stray at l^d., 4s. plewch sihier, 
9d. hwik siluer, 4 poultry and 3 hens at 2d., in all 15, 8s. 5d. ; the lands of Wlgrame Beig, 
40s. ferme, 20 bolls ferme victual at 8s. 4d. Scots, in all 7 of old ferme ; the lands of 
Subambuster, 10s. Scots of ferme, 2s. plewch siluer, 3d. hwik siluer, in all 12s. 3d. Scots old 
ferme ; the lands of Halkryk with the mill, alehouse, and fishing of the crwis, 2 chalders 
ferine victual at 8s. 4d. Scots per boll, 2 gersum martis at 30s., 12 capons at 4d., 12 poultry 
and 12 halkhennis at 2d., 4s. plewch siluer, 9d. hwik siluer, in all 16, 17s. lid. Scots old 
ferme ; the lands of Westerdaill, 6 bolls ferme victual at 8s. 4d., 30s. ferme, in all 4 Scots 
old ferme ; the lands of Esterdaill, 3 Scots old forme ; Thormeskeyth or Thormeisdaill, 20s. 
Scots old ferme ; Miremichaelis, 13s. 4d. Scots old ferme ; Stanstill, about 3^ pennylands, 
otherwise granted in feuferme to William Dauidsoun, 46s. Scots, 7 capons at 4d., 7 poultry 
and a halkhen at 2d., 7 firlots horse corn at 4s. 2d., 28 sheaves of oats at Id , 28 hallmois 
of straye at l^d., 3s. 6d. plewch siluer, 3d. hwik siluer, 1J lie gersum mart at 30s., in all 
6, 9s. O^d. old ferme ; Alterwall, 5, 6s. 8d. Scots in ferme and grassum, and 2s. pleucfi 
siluer, in all 5, 8s. 8d. old ferme ; Deren, 3 chalders of victual at 8s. 4d. per boll, 4 grassum 
marts at 30s., 2 poultry and 4 halkhennis at 2d., 4 bolls horse corn at 4s. 2d., 64 sheaves of 
oats at Id., 64 hallowis of straye at ld., 8s. pleuch siluer, 12d. hwik siluer, in all 28, 5s. 
Scots old ferme ; also the sum of 3, 5s. Scots for getting, carrying, and building turfs or 
peats, and 3s. Scots for ariages, carriages, and other dues of the lands of Dorare, Wlgrame 
Moir, Wlgrame Beig, Subambuster, Halkrik, Westerdaill, Esterdaill, Thormeskeyth or Thor 
mesdaill, Miremichaelis, Deren, and Alterwall, and the 3 pennylands of Stanstell ; extending 



DORNOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 613 

altogether in money fermes, victual fermes, grassum marts, horse corn, sheaves of oats, hal 
lows of straw, muttons, capons, poultry, hens, teindsheaves, plewch siluer, hicik siluor, pete 
siluer, arriages, carriages, and all due services and fishings of the said lands, to the sum of 
183, 4s. 3Jd. Scots old fernie, and 40s. in augmentation the grantee accordingly paying 
yearly the sum of 185, 4s. 3^d. seisin for the lands in Strathnavar to be taken at Gauldwall 
in Ardwirnes, and for the lands in Cathanes at Dorare. 1 In 1560 the same bishop, for certain 
sums of money paid by the same earl, and for his defence of the canons and others in hoc 
periculoso tempore et in futuro, granted to the earl and his countess as before the same lands 
and offices granted in 1557 and 1559, with the addition of Skebo-castell with the castle, 
fortalice, and the pendicles, namely, Bramort, the east half of Skebo called the columbarium or 
Dowcatland with the alehouse, in Sutherland, and the lands of Brymmis (or Halfbrimes), namely, 
13^ pennylands, in Cathanes the additional lands in Sutherland extending in the rental to 
15 bolls forme victual and dry multure at 10s., 2 bolls and 2 firlots of horse corn at 5s., 
5, 13s. 4d. for the alehouse and money ferme, 20s. grassum, and 30 poultry at 3d., in all 
15, 3s. 4d. and the lands of Brymmis in Cathanes, except those formerly leased to Master 
Walter Innes, to 40 bolls 2 firlots of ferme victual at 8s. 4d., 18s. grassum, 6 bolls of horse 
corn at 4s. 2d., 96 sheaves of oats at Id., 96 hallows of straw at l^d., 36 poultry with 6 
halkhenneis at 2d., 2s. hicik siluer, 6s. plewch siluer, 3 grassum marts at 30s., in all 25, 5s. 6d. 
the grantee paying yearly the sum of 295, 8s. 6d., including 5 of augmentation. 2 In 
the same year (1560) the bishop added to his grant the lands of Kilmale and Rogart, extending 
to 30 the grantee thus paying yearly for the whole the sum of 328, 8s. Id., including 
3 of augmentation. 3 In 1564 the same bishop on the narrative that the above lands had 
been forfeited by John late earl of Sutherland for treason and lesemajesty on 28 May 15C3, 
and that Queen Mary, considering that Alexander Gordoun the earl's son was an infant and 
had not partaken in his father's crime, had by letters dated 6 March 1563 (1564) presented 
him to the bishop as feufermar of those lands granted them to Alexander in heritage, reserving 
the liferent to the lady Helen (or Elenour) Stewart, the mother of Alexander, and countess of 
Errol and of Sutherland ; the whole rental extending to the sum of 475, 12s. 10d., with 
5 in augmentation, exclusive of the lands of Kilmale and Rogart ; the grantee paying yearly 
those sums, and for Kilmalekirktoun with the teindsheaves and Rogartmoir with the mill and 
alehouse 30, in all 510, 12s. lOd. saluo iusto calculo.* The bishop at the same time appointed 
Alexander Gordoun hereditary bailie of all the lands and possessions of the bishoprick on the 
following terms that he should not appoint a deputy without the bishop's consent that, 
if the bishop should grant any of his lands in feufernie or in long leases, he should reserve 
the bailiary to Alexander Gordoun, as bound by his own charter to the late Earl John dated 
8 December 1553 and that grants or leases made by the bishop after the grant of the 

1 Sutherland Charters. The seal of the chapter at- 3 Sutherland Charters. The yearly payments are 

tached to this deed bears the legend s. CAPITVLI EC- given from the originals, although not always calcu- 

CLESIE SANCTE DEI GENiTBicis MAKIE CATANENSis. lated with correctness. 

3 Ibid. Protocol book of William Gray at Dunrobin. * Ibid. 

VOL. II. 4 I 



G14 OKLG-INES [DOBNOCH. 

bailiary to Earl John should not in any way prejudice Alexander to whom the bishop further 
granted 100 yearly out of the readiest profits of the said lands as bailie's fee, reserving as 
before the liferent to the lady Helen Stewart. 1 And, as the castles of Skebo and Scrabustar 
and the palace of Dornoch were situated in a wintry region and among the wild and uncivilised 
Scots, the bishop appointed Alexander and his heirs hereditary constables of the same, granting 
them all the rights and services due to the office, his lands of Skebocastell extending yearly 
to 13, 3s. 4d., the 9^ pennylands of Scrabustar with the castle extending to 27, 12s. lid., 
and his lands, crofts, and acres of the whole city of Dornoch extending to 10, in all 
52, 16s. 3d., for their expenses in keeping those castles, which should be built and maintained 
by the bishop at his own expense for his reception when in those parts. 3 Seisin was appointed 
to be taken for the lands of Wester Skebo and others contained in the grant of 1557 at 
the castles of Skebo or Scrabustar or at the palace of Dornoch for Gauldwale and those 
contained in the grant of 1559 at Gauldwale in Ardurnes or at Dorare in Cathanes and 
for Kilmalekirktoun with the teindsheaves and alehouses, and Eogartmoir with the mill and 
alehouse, on the lands of Kilmalekirktoun. 3 Between the years 1561 and 1566 we have the fol 
lowing rental, which does not always tally with the above grants. ' The rentall of the bishoprik 
of Cathnes giwin in be [Johne Kennedy]. Item the barronie of Ardurines callit xv dawoch land 
with the salmond fishing of the samyne, pendicles and pertinentis thairof, with the tcindshawis of 
the samin, sett in few and payis yeirlie in all dewtie 81, 6s. 8d. Item the townis of Skaill and 
Ilegeboll payis yeirlie in all dewtie 6 money. Item the barronie of Skebo with pendicles 
and pertinentis thairof sett in few and payis yeirlie in all dewtie the sowme of 54, 19s. Sd. 
Item Stoirdaill, Nygdaill (Mygdaill), and Lytill Croicht, sett in few for the yeirlie pay 
ment of 20. Item Kilmaliekirktoun and Eoard payis yeirlie the sowme in few mail], 
xx merkis money. Item the croftis and tenomentis in Dornoche payis yeirlie the sowme of 
10. The few landis within Cathnes. Item the barronie of May with pendicles and perti 
nentis thairof sett in few to the erle of Cathnes paying yeirlie in all dewtie 84. Item 
the town of Dorare payis yeirlie in all dewtie the sowme of 15, 18s. 5d. Item Lytill 
Vllagrahame yeirlie in ail 7. Subumster yeirlie in all dewtie 11s. 3d. Haliecrik, with 
myln, cowff, and salmond fishing, payis yeirlie in all dewtie 16, 17s. lid. Wasterdaill 
yeirlie in all dewtie 4 money. Eisturdaill yeirlie in all dewtie 3 money. Thormsdaill 
yeirlie in all dewtie 20s. Meremechalis yeirlie in all dewtie 13s. 4d. Stansall yeirlie in 
all dewtie 9. Lyth within the paroshin of Bowar in all dewtie 9. Atterdaill (Alterwall) 
yeirlie in all dewtie 5, 8s. 8d. Derane yeirlie in all dewtie 28, 5s. Item thir particular 
townis fewit and payis mair in augmentatioun of the rentall 3, 5s. ; Brymis yeirlie in all 
dewtie 46 ; Forss with the mylne and salmond fishing thairof payis yeirlie in all dewtie 
28, 4s. 6d. ; Bailzie payis yeirlie in all dewtie 56s. ; the twa pairt of Lochmoir (Lythmoir) 
with the twa pairt of Awist and tua pennyland mair nor the saidis tua pairtis payis yeirlie in 



DORNOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 615 

all dewtie 21, 8s. 4d. ; Stambusteir in all dcwtie 9, 16s. 8d. ; Scrabuster in all dowtie 
34, 15s, ; the croftis of Scrabuster yeirlie 10s. ; the quarter of the waiter of Thurseth payis 
yeirlie in all dewtie 13, 6s., 8d. ; Tenpennyland in Weik with Bishopisqwyis and Canisqwyis 
yeirlie in all 16s. 6s. 4d. ; North Kilmster yeirlie in all 19, 16s. 8d ; the myln of Vindleis 
yeirlie in all 5 ; thrie ottomis in Netherlandnorne (Myrelandnorne) yeirlie 5s. ; the mylne 
of Lythmoir in all 6, 5s. Item thir particullar townis fewit and payis mair in augmentatioun 
of rentall 6 mony ; Item for the annuellis of Thursocht, of the tenentis thairof yeirlie vi 
do[sane] geis (on margin, presentlie xii li. vs., vi do[sane] geis). Sumnia of this haill tempo- 
ralitio 607, 18s. od. The rentall of the teindis of the bisehoprik foirsaid. Item the teind- 
sliawis of the paroshin of Ray within Cathnes sett in assedatioun yeirlie for the sowme of 
79, 6s. 8d. Item the teindshawis of the paroshin of Thursoche within Cathnes sett in asse 
datioun for the yeirlie sowme of 126, 16s. 8d. Item the teindshavis of the paroshin of Weik 
within Cathnes sett in assedatioun for the yeirlie payment of 196, 13s. 4d. Item the teind 
shavis of the paroshin of Lethrin within Cathnes set in assedatioun for the yeirlie payment 
of 81, lls. 8d. Item the teindshawis of the paroshin of Lothe within Swthirland sett in 
assedatioun for the yeirlie payment of 75, 17s. 4d. Item the teindshavis of the paroshin 

of Kilmaly within Suthirland sett in assedatioun for the yeirlie payment of 105, 15s. 

Deducit. Item thair is to be deducit of this prenominat rentall that is giwin in yeirlie 
pensioun to Mr. Alexander Gordoun bishop of Galloway, &e. to the quhilk he is prouidit, 
and cautioun actit for yeirlie payment thairof, videlicet the sowme of 500 merkis money. 1 
Item mair to be deducit yeirlie for contributioun to be payit to the Lordis of Counsall 14. 
Item siklyk to be deducit in heritable bailzie fie to my Lord of Suthirland 100 mony 
conforme to his infeftment maid thairvpon. This rentall presentit be Johne Kennedie. 
Subscryvit with my hand. Sie subscribitur, Johne Kennedy with my hand. Money, 
1283, 18s. 9d. ; 3 thairof 426, 19s. 7d. Geis vi do[sane] ; 3 thairof ii do [sane]. All 
vthir thingis omittit. Memorandum that this be tain vp but prejudice of the auld rentall 
quhill thir takis and fewis be producit to sie the tyme of thair giwing.' 2 In 1570, in a 
feud between the earl of Caithness and the Murrays of Sutherland, while Dornoch was 
occupied by the latter, the master of Caithness burned the cathedral with the exception of 
the steeple, which with the castle was held by the other party. 3 We are not informed that 
the bishop acted any part in that matter, but he probably took the side of the Murrays and 
of Earl Alexander, to the latter of whom in 1577 he gave seisin of all the lands formerly 
granted to him in his minority. 4 In the same year he is styled earl of Marche and bishop 
of Cathenis, in 1579 earl of Levenax and bishop of Cathnes, and in 1581 earl of Marche, 
commendator of the priory of Saint Andrews, and bishop of Cathnes. 5 In the last of those 
years he granted to Alexander earl of Sutherland a new infeftment in the same lands and 

1 This is Alexander Gordon who was appointed - Book of Assumptions. 

bishop on the rebellion of Bishop Robert and from 3 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 156. 

this it appears that the latter had been restored to the 4 Sutherland Charters, 

see only on the arrangement here stated. 5 Ibid. 



616 ORIGIKES [DORXOCH. 

offices granted to him in 1564, and specified in the bishop's precept of seisin of 15 January 1576 
(1577), which the earl had resigned in the bishop's inner chamber in the abbey (priory) of 
Saint Andrews. 1 In 1605, on 5 November, the day of ' the detestable powder treasone,' the 
pillars ' of the north syd of the body of the cathedrall church at Dornogh (apparently half of 
those of the nave) were blowen from the verie roots and foundation quyt and clein over the 
outer walls of the church.' 2 The repair of the church was begun by John earl of Sutherland 
in 1614, and after his death in 1615 was continued by Sir Robert Gordon tutor of Sutherland, 
the historian of the family, who in 1617 caused it to be roofed with slate from a quarry newly 
opened in the neighbourhood. 3 In 1641 King Charles I. granted to Mr. Alexander Monro 
minister at Durnoch and his successors serving the cure of that church, 'being the cathedrall 
kirk of the dyocie of Caithnes,' the sum of 800 marks Scots in money or 8 chalders in victual 
in augmentation of their stipend from the rents of the bishoprick in the parish of Thurso and 
elsewhere, on condition that they should pay yearly 300 marks for upholding the fabrick of 
the church and 200 marks to help to provide a schoolmaster for the grammar school. 4 

In 1363 a charter of William Pop the son and heir of William Pop burgess of Elgin is 
witnessed by Malcolm of Alues (or Alnes) dean of Cathanes. 5 In 1455 the grant of Bishop 
William to his brother Gilbert Mudy, above cited, was witnessed by Patrick Fraser dean of 
Cathanes. 6 In 1487 Sir Donald Ros dean of Cathanes witnessed the foundation charter of 
the collegiate church of Tayne. 7 Master Adam Gordoun, a canon of Moray (apparently pre 
centor), was also dean of Caithness in the end of the fifteenth and beginning of the sixteenth 
century. 8 He is said, as we have seen, to have ruled the bishoprick during a vacancy of 24 
years, and he died on 5 June 1529. 9 On 12 June following Master Alexander Suthirland 
was dean of Cathanes. 10 He was the son of William Suthirland of Duffous and Jonct Innes, 
rector of Duffous in Moray, and latterly official of that diocese. 11 In 1512 he was made 
rector of Duffous, and in 1524 perpetual chaplain of the chapel of the Virgin Mary of the 
castle of Duftous, and in 1526 took the oath of canonical obedience to Robert bishop of 
Moray. 12 In 1529 after he was made dean of Cathanes, in 1532, and in 1535, he witnessed 
various charters given in Moray and Sutherland. 13 In 1537 he resigned to Bishop Andrew 
all right which he had in the lands of Achloch. 14 In 1538 (10 August) Thomas Young 
burgess of Elgin sold to the dean of Cathanes a stone ' ducat' on the south side of the 
burgh of Elgin with a space of 12 feet on every side of it, which the dean in the same 
year (14 August) gave to found two anniversaries in the choir of the cathedral of Moray 
for the weal of the souls of his parents William Sutherland of Duffous and Jonet Innes, of 

1 Sutherland Charters. Sutherland, p. 104. There was at the same time au 

2 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 255. Adam Gordon prebend of Petty and Bracholy. 

! Ibid., pp. 309, 346. 9 See above, p. 608. Genealogy of the Earls of 

1 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. pp. 599, 600. Sutherland, p. 104. 

5 Reg. Morav., p. 313. "' Regist. Moravicnse, p. 416. 

6 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. viii. no. 123. " Ibid., pp. 371, 374, 398, 401, 402, 416, 429, 430. 
' Ibid., lib. x. no. 109. 12 Ibid., pp. 372, 401. 

9 Regist. Moravicnse, pp. 236, 237, 238, 240, 241, > 3 Ibid., pp. 374, 416. Sutherland Charters. 
243-245, 257. 202, 204, 402. Genealogy of the Earls of " Sutherland Charters. 



DORNOCH.] PAEOCHIALES. <;i7 

William Sutherland of Duffous his brother, of Master Adam Gordoun dean of Cathanes and 
canon of Moray, and of himself the founder. 1 In 1542, 1544, 1549, and 1551, he still appears 
as dean of Cathanes, rector of Duffus, and official of Moray. 3 From 1557 to 1562 Master 
William Hepburn appears as dean. 3 In 1565 Henrie and Marie king and queen of Scots 
presented Gawine Boirthuik, the lawful son of Michael Boirthuik of Glengelt, to the deanery 
of Caithnes then vacant by the decease of Master William Hepburne. 4 In 1566 (19 July), 
within the choir of the cathedral church of Dornoch, John Kennetye living in Clynekirk- 
town, in virtue of the above presentation and of a letter of collation by Robert bishop of 
Caithnes dated at the palace of Scrabuster on 1 June 1566, and as the procurator of Gavin 
Borthuik, received seisin of the dean's stall and place in the chapter from Master Thomas 
Brady vicar pensionary of the parish church of Wattin as the executor specified in the 
bishop's letter. 5 Gavin Borthuik, afterwards Master Gavin, held the deanery till 1607 or 
1608, when he resigned. 6 In 1608 (5 January) King James VI. presented Master John 
Gray, the son of Gilbert Graye of Suardell, to the deanery of Cathnes then vacant by the 
resignation of Gavane Borthuik. 7 In 1610 Master John Gray, with the consent of the bishop 
and chapter, leased to John master of Sutherland for life, and to his heirs and assignees for 
twice 19 years, the teinds of Clyne belonging to the deanery, and the dean's quarter of the 
teindsheaves of the parish of Dornoch and of the teind vicarage, namely, the teindsheaves 
and teind vicarage of the town and lands of Eyndboll, Balknok, Auchintreasurer, Auchin- 
chanter, Pittgrodie, Auchincloich, Auchinlong, Ballalone, Dauchfin, Auchgormlarie, Auche- 
vauch, and of the town and lands of Dornoch, all in the parish of Dornoch, for the yearly 
payment of 40 bolls of bear between Yuill and Candlemess, and of the sum of 193 marks 
3 shillings and 4 pence. 8 In 1656 Master Robert Gray provost of Dornoche was served 
heir to his father Master John Gray dean of Cathnes in the manse and croft called ' the 
' Deane of Cathnes mans and croft' in the city of Dornoche, of the extent of 40 shillings 
and 3s. 4d. in augmentation and in the town and lands of Auchinloynge in the parish of 
Dornoche and earldom of Sutherland, of the extent of 4 marks 2s. 4d. 9 

In 1368 a charter of William earl of Ross is witnessed by Sir John Derlynge precentor 
of Caitnes. 10 In 1455 John Kenniti was precentor of Cathanes. 11 In 1497 (apparently after 
10 August), during the vacancy of the see, King James IV. presented Nicholace Patersoun 
to the chantry of Cathnes vacant by the decease of John Kennachtsoun (perhaps the same 
as John Kenniti). 12 In the same year (17 September) King James presented Master James 
Betoun to the chantry, then vacant by the decease of Master James Auchinlek, last possessor 
of the same. 13 On 20 September he presented Sir John Poilsoun to the chantry of Dornoch 
vacant by the resignation of Master James Auchinlek last possessor. 1 * On 11 October he again 
presented Master James Betoun to the same chantry vacant by the decease of Master James 

1 Reg. Morav. pp. 401, 402. 9 Retours. 

* Ibid., pp. 398, 429, 430. Sutherland Charters. 10 Balnagown Charters. 

3 Sutherland Charters. Reg. Morav., pp. 404, 414. " Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. viii. no 123. 

4 Sutherland Charters. 12 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. i. fol. 13. 

Mbid. 6 Ibid. "Ibid. s Ibid. 13 Ibid., fol. 18. Ibid.,fol. 10. 



618 OEIGINES [DORNOCH. 

Auchinlek. 1 In 1499 (3 November) he presented Sir John Poylsoun to the chantry of 
Cathanes, when it should be vacant by the resignation of Master James Betoun last possessor. 2 
In 1504 (24 February) Sir John Poilson was precentor of Cathanes. 3 In 1515 (9 March) Sir 
Thomas Murray precentor of the cathedral church of Cathanes resigned certain lands in 
Dornoch, and in the same year (28 September) he witnessed a charter of Andrew Kynnard 
of Kynnard and Skelbo.* The same Sir Thomas appears as chanter in various following 
years down to the year 1546. 5 From 1557 to 1562 the chanter was Eobert Stewart. 6 In 
1559, with the consent of Bishop Eobert and of the dean and chapter, for the augmenta 
tion of his rental by the sum of 3s. 4d., and for certain sums of money and other favours 
bestowed upon him by John earl of Southirland, he granted to that earl, to his wife Helen 
countess of Errol, and to the heirs of their body, with remainder to the earl's heirs whom 
soever, all his lands commonly called the Chantourisfeild, with their pendicles and pertinents 
as well cultivated as to be cultivated, lying between the town and the lands of Denisfeild 
on the west, the lands of Bellinknok called the Archidenisfeild on the east, descending to 
the lands of Auchekehoch belonging to Thomas Poison of Creychmoir towards the south, and 
the Thesaurarisfeild on the north, within the barony of Skelbo and Dorhoch and sheriffdom 
of Innernes, extending in his old rental to the sum of 40s. Scots yearly, the grantee paying 
that sum and 3s. 4d. in augmentation. 7 In 1562 (September) with the same consent he 
leased to the same earl, his countess, and their heirs, for 19 years, his benefice of the chantry, 
including the parsonage and vicarage of Creich, together with his quarter of the parsonage 
and vicarage of Dornoch, namely, the teindsheaves of Strathormlie and the other teinds what 
soever according to use and wont, with his glebe called the Chantourisfeild with the manse 
and croft in the city of Dornoch the entry to be ' at the feist of Beltane callit Phillope 
and Jacobi' following the above date, and the yearly payment 100 Scots, from which was 
to be deducted yearly the curate's fee and the fee of the staller in Dornoch. 8 In 1577 
Gilbert Gray chanter of Cathenis, with the consent of Eobert earl of Marche and bishop of 
Cathenis, and of the chapter, leased the chantry for thrice 19 years to Alexander earl of 
Sutherland and his heirs for a yearly payment of 102 Scots. 9 In 1579 John Gray of 
Sordell and Elizabeth Barclay his wife resigned to that earl a thrice 19 years' lease of one 
fourth of the chantry, granted to them by their son Gilbert Gray the chanter with consent 
of Eobert earl of Levenax and bishop of Cathnes, in lieu of which the earl appointed them 
his assignees to the same. 10 In 1583 King James VI. presented Donald Logane minister of 
Creych to the chantry of Caithnes, vacant by the resignation of Gilbert Gray. 11 Master 
William Pape was chanter in 1602 ; and in 1607, with the consent of the bishop, dean, and 
chapter, he leased to John earl of Sutherland for life, and to his heirs and assignees for 19 years, 
reserving the liferent to himself, the teindsheaves of the chanter's quarter towns and lands lying 
in the earldom and sheriffdoni of Sutherland and barony of Pronsie, namely, of the towns and 
lands of Evelik, Eiarchar, Arsdaill, Karnamein, Pronsiecastelltoun, Pronsienaine, and Pronsiecroy, 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. i. fol. 19. 2 Ibid., fol. 95. 6 Ibid. " Ibid. Ibid. 

3 Sutherland Charters. * Ibid. Ibid. Ibid. w Ibid. " Ibid. 



DORNOCH.] PAEOCHIALES. 619 

all in the parish of Dornoch the lessee paying yearly for Evelik 1 chalder of teind, for 
Riarchar 9 bolls, for Arsdaill and Karnamein 8 bolls, for Pronsiecastelltoun 8 bolls, for Pronsif- 
naine 6 bolls, and for Pronsiecroy 3 bolls, in all 50 bolls of teind victual, or 10s. for each boll. 1 
In the year 1390 Sir John of Abyrkerdor, with the consent of the bishop of Catenes, resigned 
the chancellary of Catenes, the chaplainry of Saint Michael in the cathedral church of Moray, 
and the chaplainry of the Inche, to be exchanged for the prebend of 100 shillings or of Saint 
Giles with the vicarage of Elgyn held by Sir William of Lonkfordyn, who appears to have been 
then appointed chancellor of Catenes. 2 Bishop William's charter of 1455 is witnessed by Thomas 
Quhit chancellor. 3 In 1497 King James IV. during the vacancy of the see presented Master 
Patrick Dunbar to the chancellary of Cathanes, when it should be vacant by the resignation of 
Sir William Tarall. 4 In 1524 a charter is witnessed by Sir William Fudes chancellor of Caithnes, 
who probably died or was removed in that year, as Sir John Dingvale, archdeacon of Moray and 
rector of Strabrok in Linlithgw, seems to have been then promoted from the archdeaconry of 
Cathnes to the chancellary. 5 In 1536 a transaction between Hugh Kanide of Garwenmanis and 
John Murray of Cambussaffe was ' done in the manse of the chancellor of Cathanes within the 
city of Dornoch.' 6 From 1544 to 1554 the chancellor was Sir John Mathesoun. 7 In 1547 
Queen Mary presented Master John Craig to the vicarage of Thorso in the diocese of Gallianos, 
when it should be vacant by the resignation of Sir John Mathesoun the chancellor or otherwise. 8 
In 1548 Sir John was one who together with the bishop had to find surety to answer before the 
civil court for seizing on the fruits of the bishoprick. 9 From 1557 to 1564 Master John Jarsom. 
Jersom, or Jaksoun appears as chancellor. 10 In 1560, for certain services done and sums of 
money paid to him by Alexander Lowell, the chancellor granted to him in heritage the lands of 
Pitgrwthee with the pertinents and the culture of the lands to be newly improved (melioran- 
(iarum), lying in the earldom of Sutherland and sheriffdom of Innernes, and extending in his 
rental, in ferme, grassum, and all other duties, to the sum of 4 marks Scots yearly and also the 
croft of the chancellary descending straight from his manse and the principal house and garden 
of the same, with its two usual particles (or perticates) and tails, together with the upper part 
of the manse and chief house of the same being then a waste tenement, lying between the said 
house called the old manse and the king's high way, and bounded by the manse or waste tene 
ment of the precentor of Cathanes on the east, and the manse or waste tenement of the treasurer 
on the west, both contiguous the grantee paying yearly for Pitgrowthyee the said 4 marks, 
for the croft of the chancellary 10 shillings, and for the waste manse 2 shillings, all of old 
ferme, with an augmentation of 3s. for Pitgrowthyee, 12d. for the croft, and 2s. for the waste 
manse. 11 In 1577, 1579, and 1581 the chancellor was George Synclar, and in 1602 and 
1610 Thomas Pape. 12 

1 Sutherland Charters. ' Ibid. Keg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxx. no. 206. Reg. Sec. 

2 Regist. Moraviense, pp. 203, 324. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 27 ; vol. xxvi. fol. 74. Pitcairn's 
' Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. viii. no. 123. See p. 607. Crim. Trials, vol. i. p. 337*. 

4 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. i. fol. 16. 8 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxi. fol. 27. 

5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xx.nn. 116,124. Reg. Sec. Sig., 9 Pitcairn, vol. i. p. 337*. See p. 610. 

vol. vii. ff. 93, 104 ; vol. viii. fol. 26. 10 Sutherland Charters. Protocol Book of William 

6 Sutherland Charters. Gray at Dunrobin. " Sutherland Charters. > 2 Ibid. 



620 ORIGINES [oowxoon. 

The treasurer of Cathanes in 1455 was William Tulloch. 1 In 1494 the treasurership was 
claimed severally by Sir Thomas Myrtoun and Master Thomas the Hay, who were on that account 
summoned before the civil court in name of King James IV. as patron of the benefice during the 
vacancy of the see, and required to produce proof of their claims which might be submitted to 
the arbitration of certain prelates and clergy. 2 Sir Thomas Myrtoun agreed to have the matter 
settled thus, but Master Thomas Hay protested and appealed to Rome. 3 The king's secretary 
therefore required Master Thomas in the king's name either to abide by the determination of 
clergy chosen as arbiters by both parties, or to undergo the penalty of the law for pursuing a 
matter that touched the king's privilege ' vttouth his realme.' 4 To this he finally agreed, and by 
the consent of both parties Master Adam of Gordoun parson of Kingkell, Master Andrew Liel 
treasurer of Abirden, Master Thomas Strathauchin parson of Tulynessil, and Master Alexander 
Cambell parson of Banchre, were chosen as arbiters, with one of the three following as 
' owrman,' namely, Master Eichard Murhed dean of Glasgw secretary, Master Johne Fresale 
dean of Lestalrig clerk of register, and Master Gavin Dunbar dean of Murray, and, they failing, 
a canon of Abirden to be chosen by the arbiters. 5 The parties were appointed to meet in the 
cathedral church of Abirden or in the town of Abirden on 2 September 1494, and the arbiters 
required to decide the case between that and 6 September following. 6 In 1530 Master Thomas 
Stewart treasurer of Caithness (probably the same who previously appears as rector of Duthell 
in Moray) and certain others found caution for their appearance in court to answer for being art 
and part in the slaughter of William Sutherland of Dufhouse, who was slain in Thurso at the 
instigation of Andrew Stuart bishop of Caithness. 7 The same Master Thomas appears as trea 
surer in 1537, 1544, and 1546. 8 In 1547 Queen Mary presented Master William Gordoun 
rector of Duthell to the treasurership of the cathedral church of Cathnes, vacant or when vacant 
by the resignation or decease of Master Thomas Stewart. 9 In 1548 the same queen presented 
Master David Carnegy to the treasurership, then vacant by the decease of the same Master 
Thomas. 10 Master William Gordoun however was treasurer in 1552, and held the office till the 
year 1564 or later. 11 In 1564 John Murray was served heir male to Alexander Murray his 
brother's son in a piece or particate of land called Akchinthesaurar in the bishoprick of Cathanes, 
of the extent of 5 marks and 3s. 4d. in augmentation. 12 In 1577, 1581, and 1602 the treasurer 
was William Gray, and in 1610 the office appears to have been held by Master Alexander Gray. 13 
In 1656 Alexander Sutherland of Torboll was served heir to his brother-german John Suther 
land in Skelbo in the lands of Auchinthesawrer of the extent of 5 marks. 14 

In 1328 Andrew Hirdmanniston archdeacon of Cathanes witnessed the settlement of a 
controversy made in the chapel of the manor of the bishop of Moray at Kynedor between 
the chanter and subchanter of the latter diocese. 15 In 1365 Sir John of Moray was 

1 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. viii. no. 123. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xx. fol. 95. 

2 Aeta Dom. Cone., pp. 334, 335. "' Ibid., vol. xxi. fol. 84. 

1 Ibid., p. 335. 4 Ibid. " Lettcrfinlay Charters. Sutherland Charters. Pro- 

3 Ibid., p. 341. Ibid., pp. 341, 342. tocol Book of William Gray. 

' Pitcairrrs Crira. Trials, vol. i. p. 149. 12 Retours. " Sutherland Charters. 

* Sutherland Charters. Retours. I5 Reg. Morav., p. 152. 



DOBNOCH.] PAEOCHIALES. 621 

archdeacon of Cathanes. l In 1396 Alexander bishop of Moray, considering the earnest 
desire of John of Inncs, archdeacon of Catanes, clerk, and a native of his diocese, to study the 
canon law in the University of Paris, and seeing that the fruits of his archdeaconry were 
insufficient for the fulfilment of that desire, granted to him for a continuance the tithes of the 
'airs' and courts of the whole diocese of Moray. 2 In 1455 the archdeacon of Cathanes 
was Alexander Suthirland the son of Alexander Suthirland of Dunbeath. 3 In 1456 his 
father Alexander bequeathed to him the sum of 200 in the hands of Sir James of Weik 
to pass for him on a pilgrimage to Saint Peter of Home, and appointed him one of a number 
of persons at whose disposal he placed all his goods not disponed in his will. 4 In 1520 and 
1524 the archdeacon was Sir John Dingvale, who in the latter year appears to have been 
made chancellor. 5 In 1529 a charter is witnessed by William Gordone archdeacon. 6 In 
1544 the archdeacon was Master James Bridy or Brady, who held the same office also in 
1550 and 1551. 7 In one of the latter years, with the consent of John Sinclair his coadjutor 
and future successor in the archdeaconry, of Robert bishop elect and confirmed, and of the 
dean and chapter, and for certain sums of money and other favours, he granted in heritage 
to Alexander Murray M'Schir-Angus the lands of Balleknok with the culture of lands to be 
newly improved, lying in the earldom of Sutherland and shcriffdom of Innernes, and ex 
tending in mail, grassum, and all dues, to 3, 6s. 8d. the grantee paying yearly that sum 
with 3s. 4d. in augmentation. 8 John Sinclair appears as archdeacon in 1558, and in various 
years between that and 1577. 9 In the last named year (4 January) Alexander Murray fear 
of the town and lands of Balleknok, with the consent of his wile Martell Bos liferenter, 
granted to his firstborn son Thomas Murray and to his male heirs by his wife Margaret 
Murray, with remainder to the heirs of Thomas whomsoever, his lands of Balleknok, reserving 
the liferent to Alexander and his wife Martell, to be held of John Sinclair archdeacon of 
Cathanes and his successors according to the charter of James Brady. 10 In the same year (1 June) 
Master Robert Innes was archdeacon. 11 He again appears as archdeacon in 1580 and 1581. n 
In 1610 the archdeacon was Master M. Pont. 13 In 1633 William Lord Sinclair of Berridaill 
granted the patronage of the archdeaconry to Sir George Hamiltoun of Blaikburne, and King 
Charles I. confirmed the grant. 1 * In 1644 George earl of Caitlmes, Lord Sinclair of Berridaill, 
was served heir male in the archdeaconry to his father John master of Berriedaill. 15 

We have no satisfactory account of the connexion of the abbot of Scone with the see of 
Caithness. Between the years 1165 and 1206 Harald Earl of Orkney, Hetland, and Catanes, 
for the souls of his predecessors and of himself and his wife, granted to the canons of Scon 
a mark of silver yearly after the weight of the Scottish mark, to be paid by himself, his 
son Turphin, and his heirs for ever. 16 Between 1214 and 1249 King Alexander II. addressed 

1 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. 6 Sutherland Charters. "Ibid. 

3 Reg. Morav., p. 206. Ibid. Ibid. 

3 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. viii.no. 123. Misc. of Bannatyne 10 Ibid. Ibid. 

Club, vol. iii. 4 Misc. of Bannatyne Club, vol. iii. 12 Ibid. "Ibid. 

5 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. v. fol. 146 ; vol. vii. ff. 93, 104. 14 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. p. 154. 

Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xx. nn. 116, 124. 15 Retours. K Liber Ecclesie de Scon, p. 37. 

VOL. II. 4 K 



622 ORIGINES [DOKSOCH. 

a letter to his sheriffs, bailies, and men of Moray and of Catanes, informing them that he 
had taken under his especial protection the ship of the abbot and convent of Scon, and the 
men and goods which they had therein ; forbidding them on pain of his full forfeiture in any 
way to injure the said ship, men, or goods ; and commanding that, when the ship should pass 
to them, they should maintain and defend it and the men therein, not allowing any one to 
injure or aggrieve them, and should freely allow them to buy in those parts whatever things 
might be necessary for the victual of the abbot and convent. 1 Between 1223 and 1245, as 
we have seen, the abbot of Scon was recognised if not then first instituted as a canon of 
Cathanes with the church of Kelduninach (Kildonan) for his prebend, being bound according 
to Bishop Gilbert's constitution to serve in the cathedral church by a vicar and in his prebendal 
church by a qualified priest, but not bound to reside in either. 2 In 1226 Pope Honorius III. 
confirmed to the canons of Scon the church of Kyldonach with its chapels and lands. 3 

There were, as we have seen, other three prebends constituted by the charter of Bishop 
Gilbert, namely, those of Olrick, Dunnet, and Cannisbay, the history of which will be given 
under the heads of those parishes. 4 Other three prebends were subsequently instituted, 
namely, the rectory of Assynt, the chaplainry of Helmsdale, and the chaplainry of Kinnald 
in the cathedral church. 5 In 1544 Sir Alexander Gray, chaplain of the chaplainry of Kinauld 
in the cathedral church of Cathanes, and vicar penitentiary of Kobert bishop elect and con- 
finned, for the augmentation of his rental by the sum of 10s. 4d., with the consent of the 
bishop, dean, and chapter, granted to John Gray of Culmaly and his wife Jonet Mathesoun, 
and to the heirs male got between them, with remainder to Patrick Gray the brother german 
of John and to the heirs male of his body, to James Gray the paternal cousin of John and 
the heirs male of his body, to the elder of John Gray's female heirs without division, and to 
his heirs and assignees whomsoever, his lands of Auchinlong lying in the diocese of Cathanes 
and sheriflilom of Innernes. 6 In 1569 Robert bishop of Cathanes presented William Gray 
his minister of Dornoch to the chaplainry of Kinnald, vacant by the resignation of Alexander 
Gray. 7 In 1G49 Master James Gray preacher at Lairge, for certain sums of money paid to 
him by his lawful son Master William Gray preacher at Clyne, sold to him and his heirs 
titulo oneroso his dwelling or manse (mansio) called the prebendary's manse of Kinnald, 
lying within the city of Dornoche between the manse of the rector of Assint on the east, the 
via arcti vici ' lie narrowe vynd gate' ascending to the top of the hill on the west, the common 
road on the south, and the said hill to the top of the same on the north also his croft called 
Croftnacallache lying on the west of Dornoche, between the lands of Drumdivan and the 
common road on the north and south, and the common roads on the east and west for 
yearly payment of 6s. 8d. Scots old feuferme to the king, and IGd. in augmentation, in all 
8 shillings. 8 

1 Liber Ecclesie de Scon, p. 45. 5 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. viii. no. 123. Sutherland C'har- 

2 Sutherland Charters. See above, p. 602. tors. Sir Robert Gordon says that the chapel stood at 

3 Lib. Eccles. de Scon, p. 67. See KILDONAN post. Kinnald. Genealogy of the Earls, p. 3. 

1 See above, p. 602. 6 Sutherland Charters. 7 Ibid. Ibid. 



DORNOCH.] PAEOCHIALES. 623 

Of other functionaries connected with the cathedral we have the following notices. In 1272 
a charter of John Fraser of Glenwym given apud wbem veterem is witnessed by Henry of 
Nothingham canon of Cathanes. 1 In 1365 there appear in record Sir John of Gamery and 
Sir Symon canons of Caithnes. 2 In 1472 a charter of the lands of Thorboll is witnessed by 
Sir Farchard penitentiary of the cathedral church, and Sir Henry Wormot sacrist ; and in 
1544, as we have seen, Sir Alexander Gray chaplain of Kinauld was also vicar penitentiary 
of Robert bishop elect and confirmed of Cathanes. 3 In 1504 we have Robert Ralston the 
bishop's clerk, and in 1569 William Gray the bishop's minister at Dornoch. 4 In 1512 the 
seisin of certain crofts in Dornoch is witnessed by Masters and Sirs Malcolm Rattar, Laurence 
Smyth, Donald Swyithne, and Andrew Feme, chaplains of the choir of the cathedral church ; 
in 1527 we meet with Sir William Vmfray and Sir Donald Reid chaplains ; in 1544 Sir 
Robert Bonar, Sir James Fern, Sir Thomas Raburne, and Sir Robert Stewart, chaplains ; 
in 1545 Sir Robert Feme chaplain ; in 1546 Sir John Trumbull and Sir Thomas Raburne 
priests, and Sir Robert Feme, Sir Patrick Stephenson, and Sir Donald Reid, chaplains ; and in 
1576 Sir Farquhard Lesle chaplain (sacellanus) ; in each case probably chaplains of the choir. 5 
In 1539 William Sinclaire rector of Olrik appears as commissary pf Cathanes ; in 1562 we 
have Richard Pyot officer of the commissariat of Cathanes ; and in 1633 is recorded the death 
of another commissary Robert Monro. 6 In 1546 appears Sir Robert Steward curate of 
Dornoch, and in 1568, 1569, and 1576 Farquhard Lesly vicar pensionary of the parish church 
of Dornoch. 7 

The church of Saint Bar, taken down, as we have seen, about the beginning of the seven 
teenth century, wholly ignored in our statistical accounts, and now locally forgotten, stood 
about the middle of the town of Dornoch beside the cross still standing and on the site of 
the former council-house and prison removed in 1813. 8 

The church of Saint Gilbert, built within a few yards of the church of Saint Bar, was partly 
ruinous in the end of the last century, and till the year 1835, when it was rebuilt from the 
foundation except the central tower. 9 It seems to have been wholly First-pointed, except the 
aisles of the nave, which had circular-headed windows. 10 To the north of the choir was attached 
a strongly vaulted building, probably the chapter-house, but latterly used as a prison. 11 South 
west from the nave was a detached chapel, the burying-place of the Gordons of Embo. 12 As 
rebuilt, the church within walls is of the following dimensions length of church 126 feet ; 
height from floor to roof 45 ; length of nave 61, breadth 25 ; length of choir 34^, breadth 

1 Liber Eccles. de Scon, p. 85. Probably named 9 Pennant, vol. iii. p. 361. Cordiner's Ruins in North 
from Notingham in the parish of Latheron. Britain, vol. ii. Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. 

2 Cronicle of the Earlis of Ross. Neale's Ecclesiological Notes, p. 66. Notes taken on 

3 Sutherland Charters. * Ibid. Ibid. 6 Ibid. the spot 1854. 

7 Ibid. In 1568 he is styled quartus viewing pen- 10 Cordiner's Ruins, vol. ii. Neale, p. 66. Air. Neale 
sionarius de Dornoch. doubts the existence of the aisles, but they are distinctly 

8 Pennant, vol. iii. p. 361. Notes taken on the spot figured by Cordiner, and also remembered by persons 
1854. See p. 597. Its cemetery, mentioned in several still alive. They were about 14 feet in width, 
charters afterwards quoted, has been either partly or n Notes taken on the spot 1854. 

wholly erased. 12 Ibid. 



(524 ORIGINES [DORNOCH. 

23 feet 9 inches ; length of transepts 92 feet, length of each 31 feet 3 inches, breadth 23 feet 
'.) inches; side of square of tower 29 feet 6 inches. 1 The piscina, of continuous mouldings, 
occupies its old position in the south wall of the choir at the east end. 2 In the north transept 
is a stone sarcophagus, removed from the choir, containing, it is said, the relics either of 
Bishop Gilbert or of his brother, whose figure is represented by a cross-legged effigy on the 
lid. 3 The church has long been the burial-place of the earls of Sutherland. 4 

In 1275, on the settlement of a controversy between the earls of Sutherland and the bishops 
of Caithness, it was, as we have seen, provided by Bishop Archebald that Earl William and his 
heirs should present a chaplain to the altar of Saint James in the church of Durnach to celebrate 
perpetually for the souls of the earls of Sutherland ; and the bishop assigned as the chaplain's 
maintenance from the formes of his town of Durnach 5 marks yearly to be paid by the hands 
of his bailies at Martinmas and Whitsunday. 5 In 1509, 1512, and 1514, the aclvowson of the 
same chaplainry was included in retours of the earldom. 6 In 1551 the redemption money 
of the lands of Balnabrayt in the lordship of Skelbo was paid at the altar of Saint James the 
apostle in the cathedral church of Dornocht. 7 In 1552 John Murray or Neilsone citizen of 
Dornoch, for certain favours shown him by Master Thomas Brydy (Brady, or Brody) vicar 
pensionary of Wattin, and for a certain sum of money paid to him in his necessity, sold to 
Master Thomas and his heirs the north part of his house lying in the city of Dornoch, extending 
in length to 40 feet from the west gable of his said house to the entry of the cemetery of Saint 
Timber on the north, and thence extending in breadth from the said cemetery to the burn 
running before and descending through the said city as far as the high water mark (ad marts 
flmium) for the payment of a penny yearly at Whitsunday to the chaplain of the altar of 
Saint James the apostle in the cathedral church. 8 In 1554 the sale was confirmed by Robert 
bishop elect and confirmed of Cathanes. 9 In 1563 Robert M'Donald M'Dauid citizen of Dor 
noch, for a sum of money paid to him in his necessity, sold to Master Thomas Brody vicar 
pensionary of Wattin and his heirs his garden on the east side of the city of Dornoch with his 
house on the west side of that garden, lying between the tenement of W T alter Lesly on the south, 
the kiln of Alexander Murray of Balleknok on the north, the king's highway on the east, and 
the burn on the west, to be held of the bishop, the grantee paying to the chaplain of Saint 
James the usual yearly rent if asked. 10 In 1576 (18 March) Alexander earl of Sutherland, 
' patron of Sanct James cheplenrye situat in Sanct James ile within the cathederall kirk of 
Cathnes' long vacant in his hands, granted the chaplainry for life to his servitor John Forsythe 
for his ' anefald guid and thankfull seruice' done by him to the earl's deceased parents and 
to the earl himself, and for other causes with a precept addressed to Alexander Lovell of 
Pitgrudye his bailie in that part to pass to the said ' Sanct James ile, and thair quhair the 
alter wount to stand' to give institution to John Forsythe ' be ane Scottis plak in takin of 

1 Notes taken on the spot 1854. 2 Ibid. Neale.p. 66. 4 Genealogy passim. 

3 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 33. Pen- 5 Sutherland Charters. See above, pp. 603, 604. 

nant. Cordiner. Neale. Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. 6 Ibid. 

Ace. Notes taken on the spot 1854. The effigy is not " Ibid. 8 Ibid, 

that of a bishop. * Ibid. ' Ibid. 



DORNOCH.] PAEOCHIALES. 625 

his possession of the sam.' 1 On 2 April institution was given accordingly super locum in quo 
olim altare diui Jacobi predicti edificabatur. 2 In 1580 Robert bishop of Cathanes confirmed 
both the grant and the institution. 3 

The chaplainry of Kinnald has been noticed above. 4 

Between the years 1127 and 1153 King David I. commanded Reinwald earl of Orkney, 
and the earl and all good men of Cateneis and Orkney, as they loved him, to respect the monks 
dwelling at Durnach in Cateneis and their men and goods, and to defend them whithersoever 
they might go in those parts, not allowing any one to do them injury or shame. 5 

It is said that in 1271 Sir Patrick Murray founded at Dornoch a convent of Red Friars, 
otherwise named Mathurines or Trinity Friars, and that, after the English became masters of 
Berwick, the lands belonging to the Red Friars there were given to the Friars at Dornoch/' 

A monastery, in modern times known as Franciscan, stood at the south-east corner of the 
town on the road leading to the links. 7 

In the Register of Ministers and their Stipends after the year 1567 we have the following 
'Dornoch, Williame Gray younger exhorter in the Irsche toung 1 merkis, and xx merkis 
mair sen Beltane 1569 for supporting of Creich in the ministratioun of the sacramentis, videlicet 
baptysme.' 8 In 1574 and 1576 the same William Gray, minister at Dornoch and Creich, 
had for his stipend 100 marks, and William Aw reader at Dornoch had 20. 9 

The bishoprick of Caithness by the Antiqua Taxatio was estimated according to one authority 
at 386, 13s. 4d., and according to another at 286, 14s. lO^d. being taxed for the papal 
contribution according to the one at 4d. per mark to the amount of 7, 3s. 4^d., and according 
to the other (at what rate is not stated) to the amount of 8, 19s. 2-|d. and the of a farthing. 10 
In the Taxatio Sec. XVI. ad rationem triginta millium librarum it is taxed at 206, 13s. 3d., 
and in the Libellus Taxationum it is valued at 1000 marks. 11 At the Reformation, as we have 
seen, the total value of the bishoprick was stated at 1283, 18s. 9d. 12 

The deanery in the Taxatio Sec. XVI. is rated at 12, 8s., and in the Libellus Taxationum 
is valued at 40. 13 Between 1561 and 1566 the rental of the deanery is given as follows 
' The rentall of the denrie of Cathnes pertening to Mr. Williame Hepburne dene thairof is 
x chalderis beir, and fourty merkis money for the vicarage of Kirktoun of Clyne and Denesfeild 
heirof the vicarage onpayit.' u 

In the Taxatio Sec. XVI. the chantry is taxed at 16, 10s. 3d., and in the Libellus it is 
valued at 53, 6s. 8d. 15 In the rental of the assumption of thirds we have the value of the chantry 

1 Sutherland Charters. 7 Sketch of Dornoch by R. S. Taylor Esquire. Per- 

2 Ibid. 3 Ibid. 4 See p. 622. haps the three monasteries were but one. 
5 Keg. de Dunfermelyn, p. 14. The earl of Catenes 8 Reg. of Min., p. 63. 

aud Orkney was doubtless Earl Harald. sometimes 9 Book of Assignations. 

styled the elder, who had the whole of Catenes and the 10 Registrum de Aberbrothoc, vol. i. pp. 231, 247. 

half of Orkney. Reinwald is Rognvald. Reg. Prior. S. Andrce, pp. 28; 360, 361. 



Keith, Pennant, Cordiner who give no authority 
for the statement. As Dunfermelyn was dedicated to 
the Holy Trinity, may not the alleged establishment 
of Trinity Friars be the same as the colony from Dun 
fermelyn ? 



1 MSS. in Adv. Lib. 

2 Book of Assumptions. See above, p. 61; 5. 

3 MSS. in Adv. Lib. 
Rook of Assumptions. 

5 MSS. in Adv. Lib 



626 ORIGINES [DOBNOCH. 

as follows ' The rentall of the chantorie of Cathnes pertoning to Robert Stewart chantour 
tliairof sett in assedatioim for yeirlie payment of i Ib. Item for the Chantourisfeild in few 
yeirlie xls. Sic subscribitur Johne Kcnnedie with my hand.' 1 

The chancellorship is rated in the Taxatio Sec. XVI. at 12, 8s., and is given in the Libellus 
as worth 26, 13s. 4d. 2 At the Eeformation its yearly value was given in to the collector 
of thirds as follows ' The rentall of the chancellarie of Cathnes pertening to Mr. Johne 
Jaksoun chancellor tliairof. Payis yeirlie vi chalderis beir and ane hundreth merkis money 
for the personage and vicarage. Item the Chancellarisfeild yeirlie xls. Heirof thair is to be 
deducit of the chansellarie that is giwin in yeirlie pensioun to Thomas Mathesoun xl Ib.' 8 
In 1574 the chancellary seems to have been valued at 140, but the chancellor's name 
George Sinclair is erased, and another substituted for it, ' becaus George Sinclair, being chargeit 
for the haill fruites of the chancellarie of Cathenes for non-residence upon allegeance of deidlie 
feid, obtenit decreit absolvatour.' 4 

The treasurership, rated in the Taxatio at 18, and valued in the Libellus at 26, 13s. 4d., 
is valued at the Reformation thus ' The rentall of the thesaurarie of Cathnes pertening to 
Mr. Williame Gordoun. Payis yeirlie iii chalderis half chalder beir, and i c merkis money. 
Item the Thesaurarisfeild yeirlie xls.' 5 

The archdeaconry is rated in the Taxatio at 24, 16s., and is valued in the Libellus at 80. 6 
At the Reformation we have a rental, which including the teindsheaves of Bowar and Vattin 
for 1561, the dues of the archdeacon's personal lands, the mill of Scarmlat, the lands of 
Ballinknok, and the vicarages of Bowar and Vattin, and deducting 16 yearly for the chorister, 
gives in all 55 in money and 28 chalders 15 bolls of victual. 7 We have also ' Ane vthir 
rentall of the archdenrie of Cathnes. The archdenrie of Cathnes set for takis to ryn to Dauid 
Sinclar of Dune his airis and assignayis for the sowme of xii xx merkis yeirlie with the payment 
of the stallaris fie of Dornocht and curatis fie of Bowair with all vthir ordinar chargis. 
Subsryvit with my hand. Sio subscribitur Williame Lame.' 8 

The valuation of the other prebends will be given under the heads of the respective churches. 9 

We have no valuation of the chaplainry of Kinnald. 10 

The yearly value of the chaplainry of the altar of Saint James the apostle was, as we have 
seen, 5 marks. 11 

Between the years 1203 and 1214 Hugh Freskyn granted to Master Gilbert archdeacon 
of Moray, and to those of his clan (parentcla) whom he might appoint his heirs, and to their 
heirs, all his land of Scelbol in Suthyrland and certain other lands, the grantee doing the 
service of one bowman and acquitting the forinsec service of the king. 12 Before 1214 the 
grant was confirmed by King William the Lion, saving his own service, and before 1222 by 

1 Book of Assumptions. 7 Book of Assumptions. See BOWER and WATTIN 

'' MSS. in Adv. Lib. post. 

' Book of Assumptions. 8 Ibid. 

I Book of Assignations. 9 See KILDONAN, OLRICK, &c. 

' MSS. in Adv. Lib. Book of Assumptions. 10 See above, p. 622. See above, p. 624. 

II MSS. in Adv. Lib. 12 Sutherland Charters. 



DORXOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 627 

William lord of Suthyrland the son and heir of the deceased Hugh Freskyn, the land to be 
held according to Hugh Freskyn's charter. 1 

Before 1235 or in that year Gilbert bishop of Katanes (formerly archdeacon of Moray) 
granted the land of Scellebolle and other lands in Suthyrland in heritage to Richard his brother.'-* 
In 1235 King Alexander confirmed the grant of those lands, to be held by Richard and his 
heirs of the heirs of Hugh Fresekin according to the bishop's charter to him, the charter of 
Hugh Fresekyn, and King William's confirmation granted to the bishop, saving the king's 
service. 3 In 1330 Kenneth earl of Suthyrland, the son of the deceased William earl of 
Suthyrland, by a charter dated at the chapel of Saint Andrew of Goldespy on the day after 
the feast of Saint Nicholas -on the narrative that in times past many dissensions had arisen 
between his predecessors and the predecessors of Reginald of Moray the son and heir of the 
deceased Alan of Moray of Culbyn touching divers lands, debts, possessions, and their rights, 
and other matters in order to terminate those disputes and to establish friendship between 
himself and Reginald and their heirs, resigned to the latter all kinds of exactions of debts, 
and all controversies, quarrels, and calumnies, moved or to be moved till that date about all 
lands, possessions, and tenements within his earldom, about which his charter of confirmation 
granted to Reginald bore witness. 4 The earl granted also to Reginald the whole relief of his 
lands in Suthyrland on account of the matrimonial alliance formed between Gilbert of Moray 
the son and heir of Reginald and the earl's eldest daughter Eustachia faithfully promising 
that, if any letter obligator)' or conventional, or any muniments or writings public or private-, 
could be found, which might favour the earl or his heirs and in any way be prejudicial to 
Reginald or his heirs, such writings should be for ever null ; and binding himself faithfully to 
maintain and defend Reginald, his men, and his lands, and their possessions, and to support 
them in all justice, counsel, aid, and favour. 5 

The lands and castle of Skelbole were afterwards in the hands of Bishop William Mudy, 
who, as we have seen, in 1455 granted them to his brother Gilbert and two lawful heirs. 6 In 
1478 King James III. confirmed the grant. 7 

Between that date and 1494 the same lands and castle seem to have been held successively 
by Alane of Kynnard of that ilk, by John of Kynnard (both dead in 1494), and by Thomas 
of Kynnard, who in that year had a litigation about the lands and castle with Marjory 
Mowat the widow of John. 8 In 1510 King James IV. granted to Andrew Kynnard of that 
ilk, one of the free tenants of the earldom of Suthirland, the dues of his lands of Skelebow 
in that earldom till the entry of the righteous heir. 9 In 1512 Thomas Kynnard is styled of 
Skelbo. 10 In 1515 Andrew Kynnard of that ilk and of Skelbo granted to John M'Ky in 
heritage the lands of Eddiraquhelis, then in the barony of Skelbo. 11 In 1518 Adam earl of 
Suthirland and Elizabeth Suthirland countess and ' heritare' gave a precept of seisin in the 

1 Sutherland Charters. " Ibid. 3 Ibid. ' Ibid. 

4 Ibid. Sir Robert Gordon (Genealogy, p. 44) says 8 Acta Dom. Cone. p. 348. Acta Dom. And. pp. 203. 

that the lands in question were those of Skelbo. They 204. See Skelbo Castle post. 

were doubtless included in the arrangement. 5 Ibid. 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. iv. fol. 70. 

Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. viii. no. 123. See above, p. 607. 10 Sutherland Charters. "Ibid. 



628 OBIGINES [DOKXOCH. 

lands and fortalice of Skelbo in favour of Andrew Kynnard of that ilk, proceeding on the 
king's brief, and addressed to John of Murray, Murcho Murray, Normontt Leslie, Dauid 
Mvdy, and Huchoun Murray, their bailies in that part. 1 In 1525 the same earl, with the 
consent of the same countess, lady of the lands of Sudirland and superior of the lands of 
Skelbo in the lordship of Sudirland and sheriffdom of Innernes, ordered his bailies in that 
part, namely, John Murra, Rore Hurra of Spandaill, Valter Kynnard of Culbyn, Murchur 
Murra, and Alexander Murra, to give seisin to John Kynnard, the son and heir of the 
deceased Andrew Kynnard of that ilk last tenant and possessor of the lands, and admitted by 
the earl as tenant and heir, in the land of Skelbo, the castle, and manor, and in East Skelbo 
witli the alehouse and crofts, Dawauchdow, Auchandro, Paitmayne, Balnobraid, Cammeseffe, 
Estir Abbirschoir, Vestir Abbirschoir, Litill Roart, Knokcartnoll, Moireuch, Auchindowecht, 
Innirschyn with the fishings, Petintraill, Assent, Artrikquhillis, and of the whole lordship 
(dominacio) of Skelbo. 2 John Kynnard of that ilk was lord of Skelbo till the year 1529. 3 

In 1275, as we have seen, on the settlement of a long controversy between the earls of 
Sutherland and the bishops of Cathanes, Archebald then bishop resigned to William earl of 
Sutherland 2 davachs of Awelech, 3 davaehs of Promsy, 1 davach of Rutherhard, 3 quarters 
of Haskesdale, half a davach of Hachencosse, 3 davachs of Thorebol, 2 davachs of Kynalde, 
4 davachs of Largge, and 1 davach of Cuttheldawach.* In 1360 William carl of Sothyrland 
granted to his brother Nicolas of Sothyrland in free barony, for his faithful homage and service, 
J6 davachs in the earldom of Sothyrland of the land called Thorbol, namely, 3 davachs of 
Thorbol, 1 davach of Rouarkar, 1 davach of Assastel, 1 davach of Proncey Upper, 1 davach 
of Proncey Nether, 1 davach of Proncecroy, 2 davachs of Euelek, and other lands, to be 
held by Nicolas and the lawful heirs of his body for the service of one soldier yearly. 5 In 
1362 King David II. confirmed the grant, saving the king's service. 6 In 1408, by a charter 
dated at the castle of Duifous (in Moray), John of Sutherland, the son and heir of Nicholas 
of Sutherland lord of the castle of Duffous, confirmed the resignation of 40 lands in the 
oarldom of Suthirland by his father, and a grant of the same by Robert carl of Suthirland 
to John's brother Henry of Suthirland, with reversion to John failing heirs of Henry's body." 
In 1444, by a deed dated 12 July at Pomfret in England, John earl of Suthirland declared 
that he had seen a certain resignation, made at his chapel of Saint Andrew by Nicholas of 
Suthirland lord of the castle of DufFhus in the hands of Robert earl of Suthirland, of the 
lands and tenements of Thurboll, namely, of lands to the value of 40 lying in the earldom 
of Suthirland and sherift'dom of Innernes ; and that in the same chapel the same Earl Robert 
had granted those lands to Henry of Suthirland the son of Nicholas and to the male heirs 
of his body, for service of ward and relief, three suits yearly at the earl's court in Suthir 
land, and all other forinsec services belonging to the ward and relief; in which lands the 
same Henry died vest and seised, and had male issue the earl's kinsman Alexander of Suthir 
land lord of Thorboll. 8 On the same day Earl John granted to Alexander of Suthirland of 

1 Sutherland Charters. 2 Ibid. 6 Ibid. Kob. Index, p. 43, no. 30 ; p. 69, 1. 32 ; p. 72, 

3 Ibid. * Ibid. 5 Ibid. no. 36. " Sutherland Charters. Ibid. 



DORNOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 629 

Thurboll the said resignation, and the said lands of Thurboll, namely, Thurboll, Straqhaqh- 
charu, Litil Thurboll, Ilik, Pronnsecroie, Nethirpronnse, Ouirpronnse, Aqliaqliasse, Dale, 
Boyaqhrer, and others. 1 In 1448 appears in record the same Alexander of Suthirland of 
Thurcboll, and in 1455 appears Angus of Sutherlande of Thurboll. 2 In 1472 John earl of 
Suthirland granted in heritage to his kinsman Nicolas of Suthirland, the son and apparent 
heir of his kinsman Angus of Suthirland of Thurcboll, with remainder to Angus and his 
heirs, the lands of Thurcboll Micle, Thureboll Litle, Strathacharne, Kuryarchar, Askadaile, 
Vfir Pronnsy, Nethir Prounsy, Pronnsycroy, Evillik, and others in the earldom of Suthirland 
and sheriffdom of Innernis, resigned by Angus in the cathedral church at Dornach, the 
grantee doing the usual rights and services, reserving the liferent to Angus, the terce to his 
wife Cristina, and the ward and relief to the earl, if Angus should die before his son. 3 In 
1492 Hugli the son of Angus Sutherland lord of Thurboll, on a precept of John earl of 
Sutherland, was infeft in the lands held by Angus his father, and by Nicholas and Donald his 
brothers. 4 In 1505 or 1506 Hugh Sutherland of Spronse granted to Andrew Kynnard of 
that ilk, for his good service both in war and in peace, the lands of Spronscnain in the 
earldom of Sutherland and sheriffdom of Innernis. 5 In 1510 King James IV. granted in heri 
tage to Cristina Suthirland the daughter of Hugh Suthirland of Torbull and John Stewart 
her intended husband, with remainder to the heirs of Hugh, the lands of Thurball in the 
earldom of Suthirland which Hugh Suthirland had resigned. 6 In 1525 Adam Gordon earl 
of Sutherland and Elezabeth his wife countess and hereditary lady of the same lest the 
lands subject to their dominium should pass to an uncertain heir or to unknown persons 
having no title having considered the right of succession of William Sutherland lord of 
Duftbus to the lands and lordship of Pronse by the decease of Hugh Sutherland formerly 
lord of Pronse without male heirs, and by reason of entail and ancient infeftment, granted 
in heritage to the same William for his service the same lands and lordship, namely, the two 
towns of Turbois with the mill of the same, the lands of Dalnamayne, Vuir Pronse, Pronse- 
croy, Pronsenayn, the lauds of Ewillic with the mill, the lands of Ruarchar, Austisdaill, with 
others in the earldom of Sutherland and sherifl'dom of Innernis, reserving to themselves the 
superiority, and the ward, relief, and marriage, when they should occur, the grantee paying 
those dues, and giving them his counsel and assistance in their causes. 7 

By an indenture dated at Aberdein 1 April 1529 it was agreed that John Kynnard of that 
ilk should heritably infeft William Suthirland of Duftbus in his lands of Skelbo with the castle, 
salmon fishing, and other pertinents, to be held of the earl of Sutherland for service used and 
wont that William Suthirland should for that infeftment pay to John Kynnard 2500 marks 
Scots, namely, 1000 at the town of Dunde on 6 May following, on which day John Kynnard 
should give him a charter of the lands of Innerschine and Awchindowich with the fishing of 
the water and ' lyn ' of the same, and of the lands of Estyr Abyrskoure (none of which are 

1 Sutherland Charters. 5 Sutherland Charters. 

2 Ibi(i a Ibid . Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xvi. no. 138. 
' Charter in General Register House. ~ Sutherland Charters. 

VOL. II. 4 L 



(530 OEIGINES [DOKNOCH. 

in the parish of Dornoch) ; the remaining 1500 marks to be paid at the same town on the 
feast of Lammes immediately following the date of the agreement, for which John Kynnard 
should by charter and seisin infcft William Suthirland and his heirs in the lands of Skelbo 
with the tenandries, castle, and fishing that the latter should endeavour to obtain the overlord's 
confirmation, discharge John Kynnard and his heirs of all recognition that might be made of 
the lands in virtue of the present alienation, warrant them against the same, and give John 
a discharge of his mother's terce and that, as part of the lands were wadset to sundry persons, 
such as John Murray, Hucheoun Calder, and Kory Johnnesoun, of which lands John Kynnard 
had the reversion, he should give up that reversion to William Suthirland, and make him his 
assignee for < outredding ' the lands at his own expense. 1 According to the above agreement 
John Kynnard on 5 May 1529 sold to William Suthirland the lands of Abirscoir Estir, 
Aehindowych, and Innerschin, and on 16 May the deed was confirmed by Alexander Gordon 
master of Suthirland. 2 On 31 July Jonet Terroll of Innerbreky resigned her lands of Petintreill 
in the barony or earldom of Suderland and sheriffdom of Innernes in the hands of Alexander 
Suderland lord of Skelbo her superior in favour of Walter Innes of Touchis and the children 
to be begotten between her and Walter, with remainder to Walter's heirs whomsoever, reserving 
the liferent to herself. 3 On 26 August John Kynnard sold to William Sutherland and his heirs 
his lands and fortalice or castle of Skelbo, with the fishings of Innerschyne and the ' lyn,' which 
on 2 September were confirmed by Alexander Gordon. 4 On 15 September John Murray of 
Campbussay, as bailie in that part for John Kynnard of that ilk, gave seisin of Skelbo and 
Innerschin to William Suthirland of DufFus, receiving a black ox with grey (gretiix) horns as 
evidence of the seisin of the lands and castle of Skelbo, and a ' brandit ' ox as evidence of the 
seisin of Innerschyne, the water, ' lyne,' net, fishing boat, and cable. 5 In 1534 or 1535 (25 
April) in the church of the Friars Minorites of Elgin William Sutherland of Duffous and 
Skailbo, the son and heir of the deceased William of Duffous and Skailbo, acknowledged that 
he had seen a certain acquittance granted by his father to John Murray of Cambusawy for the 
sum of 366 marks Scots as part payment of 500 marks due by John to the deceased William 
for the lands of Petfuir, Knokarwall, Estir Heberriscors, and Hawchandrow (some of them not 
in the parish of Dornoch) in the barony of Skailbo, which acquittance William Sutherland then 
approved and confirmed and the same William there and then discharged John Murray and 
his heirs of the sum of 40 marks Scots due by John to the deceased for 40 bolls of victual 
bought of him and, as to the ' rest' of the 500 marks, he discharged John Murray of 47 marks 
for certain reasons, especially for his ' thankis, gratitudis, and plesouris' and so of the said 
500 marks William Sutherland allowed that only 47 remained unpaid, which John Murray 
accordingly bound himself and his heirs faithfully to pay to William and his heirs between the 
above date and the feast of Saint Fimber (25 September) 1536. 6 In 1535 (27 September) the 
same William Sutherland was seised as his father's heir in the lands of Turbois and others granted 
to his father in 1525. 7 In 1536 (7 December) in the manse of the chancellor of Cathanes 

: Sutherland Charters. 2 Ibid. Ibid. ' Ibid. Ibid. 6 Ibid. Ibid. See above, p. (im 



DORNOCH,] PAROCHIALES. G31 

within the city of Dornoch Hugh Kanide of Garwonmanis and his wife Jonet Steward vine 
rods oraculo discharged John Murray of Cambussaffe of the mails, fermes, and grassums of the 
towns of Petfwr, Knokcartoll, Cambussaffe, Balbrade, and the half of Coull, and of all other 
burdens exigible from those lands down to the feast of Pentecost immediately following the 
above date. 1 In 1538 King James V. granted to Henry Kempt of Thomastoun the ward and 
nonentry of Spronase (apparently Spronse) in the sheriffdom of Innernes, formerly belonging to 
the earl of Suthirland. 2 In 1542 inquest was made in the tolbooth of the burgh of Innernes 
by William Hay of Mayne, James Innes of Rothkenze, George Munro of Dawachcarty, Thomas 
M'Culloch of Pladdis, John Murray of Carnbissach, William Dunbrek of Ortane, James Innes 
of Drane, Andrew Sudirland of Greschip, Andrew Stewart in Rossille, Hugh M'Culloch in 
Terrell, Alexander Gumming in Barmwkytie, William Doddis in Golspetour, Andrew M'Culloch 
in Craighous, Gilbert Have and Alexander Duf burgesses of Innernes, and Walter Leslie, 
Ferquhard M'Gillespy, Alexander Rater, and Alexander M'Culloch, inhabitants of Dornoch 
who declared that William Sudirland of Duffos was the lawful heir of his father the 
deceased William lord of Duffos in all the lands and yearly revenues in the sheriffdom of 
Innernes in which his father died vest and seised. 3 In 1549 (7 June), on a precept of John 
earl of Suthirland dated 2 April, Hugh Murray the son and heir of John Murray of Cam- 
bussavy was seised in the lands of Auchandro and Ester Abirscors. 4 In the same year 
(26 December), at the request of Alexander Sothirland the son and apparent heir of the 
deceased William Sothirland of Duffous, with the consent of his curator Master Alexander 
Sothirland dean of Cathanes and official of Moray, in the cathedral church of Moray, John 
Leslie prebendary of Ryne and commissary of Moray made a transumpt of the four charters 
of the lands of Thorboll dated 1360, 1362, 1408, and 1444. 5 In 1551 Sir Robert Vrquhard 
rector of Kildonein, as procurator for Master Alexander Sutherland dean of Cathanes, rector 
of Duffus, and official of Moray, assignee of the deceased William Sutherland of Duffus for 
the redemption of the lands of Balnabrayt extending to 2 davachs, lying in the lordship of 
Skelbo, earldom of Sutherland, and sheriffdom of Innernes, went to the altar of Saint James 
the apostle in the cathedral church of Dornoch, and there paid to Hugh Murray the son and 
heir of the deceased John Murray of Cambussawe burgess of Dornocht the sum of 30 Scots 
as redemption money for the lands of Balnabrayt on which Hugh Murray resigned those 
lands, which had been granted to his father by Andrew Kynnaird of that ilk. 6 In 1555, on 
precepts of seisin granted by John earl of Sutherland with the consent of Helen Stewart 
countess, Alexander Sutherland of Duffous was seised in the lands and castle of Skelbo 
and the lands and fishings of the water of Innerschyn with the ' lyn ' as heir to his 
deceased grandfather William Sutherland of Duffous, and in the lands of Turbois and 
others as in 1525 as heir to William Sutherland his father. 7 In 1560 (26 October) on 
a precept of the same earl and countess Christina Sutherland as the daughter and heiress 
of the deceased Hugh of Sutherland of Thureboll was seised in the lands of Thureboll. 8 In 

1 Sutherland Charters. 3 Sutherland Charters. 4 Ibid. 

2 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xi. fol. 56. 5 Ibid. 6 Ibid. Ibid. 6 Ibid. 



632 ORIGINES [DOENOCH. 

1560 or 1562 (more probably the former) on 30 October John earl of Sutherland, superior 
of the following lands and others, with the consent of his wife Helen countess of Errol and 
Suderland, granted in heritage to his kinsman Alexander Suderland of Duffous the lands 
and barony of Skelbo, namely, Castcltowii of Skelbo with the tower, fortalice, and mill, 
Ballewraat, Cambusawye, Ester Skelbo, Cowll, Petmayne, Wester Aberscors, Morynche, Roart- 
beig, Morines, Cragie, Awchindowych, Innerschyn with the salmon fishing of the water of 
Innerschyn and the ' lyn,' with the multures and alehouses and the lands of the barony of 
Pronsie, namely, Castelltown, with the tower and fortalice, Pronsienane, Pronsiecroye, Assidaell, 
Cornamane, Rewarchar, Avelik with the mill, Dalnam.ayne, Mekle Torboll, Litill Torboll, 
Grudebrora, Syborskeg, Kilpeddermoir, Kilpedderbeig, with the mill of Kilpeddermoir, Kil 
pedder in Strathvlze, and Cayane in Strathvlze all lying in the earldom of Sutherland and 
sheriffdom of Innernys, and resigned by Alexander Sutherland at Dunrobyn on the above 
day for a new infeftment in the same, and for the union of the lands into the free barony 
of Skelbo, seisin taken at the castle of Skelbo to be sufficient for the whole. 1 In 1562 (28 
October) the same earl with the consent of his countess granted in heritage to the same 
Alexander his kinsman for his many good services the lands of Turbois and others as in 1525, 
which were on that day resigned at Dunrobbin by Adam Eeid the husband and procurator 
of Christina Suthirland, the daughter of the deceased Hugh Sutherland of Tlmreboll, to whom 
they belonged in heritage seisin taken on the lands of Thuriboll Mekle to be sufficient for 
the whole, and the grantee giving service of ward and relief. 2 In 1562 (7 November) the 
same earl with the same consent granted anew to his kinsman Alexander Sutherland of Duftbus 
and his heirs, for his homage and for various services and benefits bestowed by him on the 
earl, the demesne lands of Skelbo with the fortalice of the same, the lands of Ester Skelbo, 
Petmayne, Cowll, Ballwraat, Cambusawye, Wester Aberscors, Morocht, Morenes, Litill Rewart, 
Ladie, Blaricht, Machaell, the half of Langwell, Innerschyn, Auchindowicht, with the salmon 
fishing of the water of Innerschine and the ' lyn,' together with the salmon fishing of Machaell 
on the water of Oychall, the fishings of salmon and other fish in fresh water and in salt 
within the bounds of the said lands and fishings, with the mill of the lands and its multures 
and sequels also the lands of Pentraell called the lands and barony of Pronsie, Thuriboll 
Mekle, Thuriboll Litill, Strathcharne or Dalnamayne, Ruriarchar, Assisedaill, Overpronsie. 
Nethirpronsie, Pronsiecroye, Evillik, Mekle Kilpedder, Litill Kilpedder, Grudebrora, Schiber- 
skek in Stratlibrora, and the lands of Caven and Kilpedder in Strathvlze, with all their mills, 
fishings in fresh water and salt of salmon and other fish, fortalices, and other pertinents all 
in the earldom of Sutherland and sherift'dom of Innernis, and resigned by Alexander on the 

1 Sutherland Charters. The grant is witnessed by 2 Sutherland Charters. The charter is witnessed 

Alexander Suderland or Hectorsone, and the seisin (of by Gilbert Gordons the earl's uncle, and the seisin 

the same date) by Nycholas Suderlaud the brother (of same date) by John Suderland in Torboll, Alex- 

Kerman of Alexander of Duffons, John Suderland or ander Suderland, Caiiicus Suderland or M'Jluldonych, 

Hectorson, Alexander Suderland his brother gcriiian, and Thomas Gibsone, servitors of Alexander Suder- 

Alexander Suderland in Litill Thureboll, and Canicns laud of Duflbus, and by William Suderland his brother 

ISuderland jjerman. 



DOBNOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 633 

above day at Dunrobbin to be united in favour of himself and his heirs into one barony 
called the barony of Skelbo, seisin taken at the fortalice of Skelbo to be sufficient for the 
whole, the grantee paying service of ward and relief, and giving personal suit at the three 
head courts of the earl to be held yearly at Dunrobbin. 1 In 1563 (20 or 22 June) Queen 
Mary granted anew to the same Alexander Suthirlande of Duffois, and to his heirs and 
assignees, the lands of Skelbo with the fortalice, tenants, and other pertinents the fishing 
on the water of Innerschyne with the ' lyn,' and all the fishings of those lands with the usual 
pertinents the lands of the two towns of Torbollis, of Dalnamane, Overspronsy in Strathfleit, 
Spronsyecroy, Spronsynane, Ewilik, Rewferchar, and Astray-daill in Brachat the lands of 
Kylpeddermoir, Sybarskaig, and Grodebrora in Strathbrora the lands of Kilpedderis and 
Cawyne in Straithvlze the mills of Torbollis the mill of Evelik the mill of Kilpedder 
in Straithvlze and all the lands of Golspytoure lying in the earldom of Suthirlande 
and sheriffdom of Innernys, and formerly held by Alexander Suthirlande of John earl 
of Suthirland, by whom they were forfeited for treason and lesemajesty on 28 May 
1563 the grantee paying the rights and services formerly due, provided that the grant 
should not prejudice the subvassals of the earl previously infeft in any of the above lands, 
and on condition of their paying their share of Alexander's composition. 2 In the same year 
(23 June) George earl of Cathanes, Alexander Suthirland of Duffus, and James Innes of 
Drainy, bound themselves and their heirs to pay to the queen's treasurer Master Robert 
Rychartsoun 1000 marks, namely, 500 at Michalmes (29 September) following, and 500 between 
that and the feast of Yule (25 December) following, on pain of horning, as the composition 
of Alexander Suthirland for the above lands and fishings the earl and Alexander being surety 
tor James Innes, and Alexander being surety for the earl the earl also agreeing to free 
Alexander Suthirland from all interdiction which he had against him for the relief of James 
Innes and caution for payment of the said sum. 3 On 14, 15, and 16 July seisin of the lands, 
mills, and fishings, was given to Alexander Suthirland on the soil of the same by the delivery 
of earth and stone, ' clap and hoppir,' net and boat.* On 22 September Queen Mary granted to 
her brother Robert Stewart junior the lands and baronies of the earldom of Sutherland, forfeited 
by Earl John, and including among other lands those of Cowle, Petmane, Bellwraith, Camusowe, 
Westir Abbirscors, Litilrod, Mornes, Innerschine with the fishings, Auchindwycht, Mykael, 
Ardinsche, Torrobull, Kynmowie, Dola, Blaroquhy, Lady, Langwell, Pettintraill, Pitfwir, 
Knokartoll, Pronssecastell, Pronssenayne, Pronnsecroy, Evillik, Askadell, Rearcheare. Mekle 
Torbo, Litill Torbo, Dalnamayne, Grudiebrora, Scheborskaik, Kilpeddermoir Kilpedderbeg, 
Kilpedder in Straithvlze, Cayne, Kintraid, Kynnald, and Golspietwir. 5 In 1564 (10 January) 
Robert earl of Suthirland on the narrative that the lands and earldom of Sutherland in the 

1 Sutherland Charters. The charter is witnessed Bartholomew Litilljolme, Thomas Forman, Valter Su- 

Uy Gilbert Gordone the earl's uncle and others, and derland and Nycliolas Suderland the brothers german 

the seisin (dated 9 November) by John Suderland or of Alexander of Duffous, and Thomas Gibsone. 

Hectorsone in Acharrie, Alexander Suderland his 2 Ibid. Reg. Sec. Sig. vol. xxxi. fol. 122. 

brother german, Alexander Suderland junior in , 3 Sutherland Charters. 

Hugh Suderland, Thomas M'Neill, David Suderland, * Ibid. 5 Reg. Sw. Sig., vol. xxxii. t'ol. it. 



(534 ORIGINES [DORNOCH. 

sheriffdom of Innernes were forfeited by Jolm formerly earl, and that he Earl Eobert had 
been infefted in the same by Queen Mary, whose will it was that the free tenants after 
settling with her treasurer about their compositions should be infeft in their tenandries as of 
old granted to Hugh Murray of Abirscors and his heirs the lands of Auchandro and Eistir 
Abirscors with the mill, formerly held in heritage of Earl John by the same Hugh, who had 
paid a certain sum as composition to the treasurer, the grantee giving the rights and services 
formerly due. 1 In the same year (22 August) Alexander Sutherland of Duffous and Skelbo, 
with the consent of George earl of Caithness his governor, granted to the same Hugh Murray 
and Beatrice Vrquhart his wife, for Hugh's homage and service, with remainder to Hugh 
Murray the son and apparent heir of Hugh, and to his heirs and assignees, the lands of a 
davach of Torboll in the lordship of Skelbo, earldom of Sutherland, and sheriffdom of Innernys 
the grantee paying ward and relief and, should Hugh or his son and heir take part with 
any one against Alexander Sutherland and his heirs, or appear in arms against them except on 
royal authority, the lands should revert to the granter. 2 In 1566, on a precept of Henry and 
Mary king and queen of Scots, Earl John was seised in the earldom of Sutherland, resigned 
by Eobert Stewart, and including among others the land of Cayan and Kilpedder in 
Straythwllzie with the mill, Kilpeddirmoir, Kilpeddirbeg with the mill, Sevirscraig, Grudebrora, 
Carnameyne, Golspetowr, Eister Aberscors, Vestir Aberscors, Knokarthoill, Kynnalde with 
the mill, Litill Eeorde, Morenes, Pitfuyr with the mill, Pittintraill with the mill, Kynbraid, 
Blarocht, Leady, Langoll, Kynmonovy, Innerschin with the salmon fishings, Auchindaucht, 
Dolaye, Mekle, Ardinche, Casteltoun of Skelbo with the place, fortalice, mill, and pertinents, 
Cambussave, Balnabraide, Pitmanyn, Andandro, Eistir Skelbo, Cowle, Prompsecastell, Promp- 
senayne, Prompsecroy, Awalek with the mill, Askisdaill, Eearquhar, Dalnameyne, Mekle 
Torboll with the mill, and Litill Torboll. 3 In 1567 Master Eobert Eychartsone, provost of 
Sanct Marie He and treasurer to Mary queen of Scots, granted to George earl of Caythnes, 
Alexander Suthirland of Duffus, and James Innes of Drainy a discharge for the sum of 1000 
marks paid by them as the composition of Alexander Sutherland for his lands of Skelbo and 
others. 4 In 1578 Alexander earl of Sutherland for a sum of money paid beforehand sold 
to Hugh Murray of Aberscors and his heirs the lands of Auchandro, Estir Aberscors, Pitfour, 
and Knokartholl, which Hugh had resigned ; the grantee paying ward, relief, and marriage, 
answering at the three yearly capital suits, and doing all the other usual services, the ' blud- 
wytis' of the lands being reserved to the earl. 5 In 1616 William Sutherland of Duffus 
was served heir to his father William Sutherland of Duffus in the demesne lands of Skelbo 
with the tower and fortalice, the lands of Eister Skelbo, Pitmean, Coull, Ballavraid, Cam- 
busavie, Westir Abirscors, Morroch, Morines, Litill Eogart, Cragie, Lady, Blerich, Mackell, 
the half of Langwell, Inncrschyne, Awchindowich, with the salmon fishings of the water of 
Innerschine and the ' lyn,' with the fishing of Makell on the water of Ockell, and the salmon 

1 Sutherland Charters. 2 Ibid. gcrmau of Alexander Sutherland in Skelbo, William 

3 Ibid. This charter is witnessed by Alexander Sutherland in Awelek, and John Sutherland in Mekle 

Sutherland in Torboll, Nicolas Sutherland the brother Torboll. 4 Ibid. See p. 633. 5 Ibid. 



DORNOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 635 

and other fishings in fresh and salt water within the bounds of those lands and fishings, with 
the mills the lands of Pentraill called the lands and barony of Pronsie, Torboll Meikil, 
Torboll Lytill, Cornamayne, Straithcairne or Dalnamayne, Euyarcher, Assiedall, Over Pronsie, 
Nether Pronsie, Pronsiecroy, Evilick, Meikill Kilpeddir, Lytill Kilpeddir, Groudbrora, 
Sheberskeg in Strathbrora, Cayane and Kilpedder in Strathulzie, with the fishings of salmon 
and other fish both in fresh water and in salt all lying in the earldom of Sutherland and 
sheriffdom of Innernes, and united into the barony of Skelbo, of the old extent of 111, 
12s. 2fd.! 

Two davachs of Kynalde, as we have seen, were in 1275 resigned by Bishop Archebakl 
to William earl of Sutherland.'-' They were afterwards held in heritage by a family of 
Sutherlands, represented about 1499 by Alexander Sutherland of Dilrid. 3 In 1499 King 
James IV., for the good service of Odo or Y Makky in Straithnauern both in peace and 
in war, and especially in the taking and bringing of the deceased Alexander Suthirland of 
Dilrid and ten persons his accomplices, the king's rebels and at his horn, granted in heritage 
to Odo certain lands forfeited by Alexander Suthirland, including Kynnald with the mill. 4 
In 1513 James Dunbar of Cumnok, the son and heir of the deceased Sir James Dunbar of 
Cumnok, sued Y M'Ky in Stranawerne for a pretended royal grant which the latter alleged 
that he had of the lands of Kynnauldy and Golspytour, which lands James Dunbar alleged 
had been apprised in favour of his deceased father for debts due to him by the deceased 
Alexander Sutherland of Dilryt, to whom at the time they belonged, and who was subse 
quently forfeited. 5 Y M'Ky having been regularly summoned before the Lords of Council 
and not having appeared, the Lords after hearing the case decerned in favour of James 
Dunbar, and ordered the earl of Sutherland to infeft him in the lands. 6 In 1539 King 
James V., on the narrative that the deceased Odonius or Y M'Ky the father of Donald 
M'Ky in Stratlmauern possessed in heritage certain lands then in the king's hands by reason 
of nonentry or otherwise, granted those lands, including as before those of Kynnald with 
the mill, to Donald M'Ky, erecting them all into the free barony of Fer. 7 In 1540 Donald 
took seisin of the lands at the principal messuage of Farr. 8 In 1551 Queen Mary granted 
in heritage to Robert bishop of Orkney the lands and barony of Far, including Kynnault 
and the mill of Kynnault, with the multures, sukkin, and astricted multures, forfeited by- 
Donald M'Ky of Far, who lived and died bastard without lawful heirs or a lawful disposition 
of the lands. 9 The lands and mill of Kynnald were included in grants of the earldom of 
Sutherland by the same queen to her brother Robert Stewart in 1563, 1564, and 1565, and 
in a new grant of the same to John earl of Sutherland in 1560. 10 In 1570 George earl of 
Huntlie, Lord Gordoune and Badenocht, baron of the barony of Farr, sold the same lands 

1 Retours. 2 See p. 604. 7 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxvi. no. 338. Reg. Sec. Sig., 

3 See following note. vol. xiii. fol. 38. 

4 Sutherland Charters. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xiii. s Sutherland Charters. 

no. 519. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. i. fol. 95. 9 Ibid. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxiv. fol. 98. 

5 Sutherland Charters. 10 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxii. ft". 5, 70, 138. Sutherland 

6 Ibid. Charters. 



63G ORIGINES [DOBNOCH. 

and others to Y M'Ky arid his heirs. 1 In 1601 they were included in a new grant of the 
earldom of Sutherland by King James VI. to Earl John. 2 In 1613 (4 June) the Lords of 
Council decided that the lands and barony of Far, including as before Kynnalt with the mill, 
multures, suckin, and astricted multures, were in the sovereign's hands by reason of nonentry 
since the decease of Robert bishop of Orknay, who died about the month of February 1558, 
or about 53 years before the date of the summons (29 December 1612), and that the king 
by a letter under his privy seal dated 2 November 1012 had granted the nonentry and 
other dues to Sir Eobert Gordoun of Kynmounwy till the entry of the lawful heir, those 
having or pretending interest in the case as hereditary possessors of the lands, namely, George 
marquis of Huntlie and erle of Enzie, Hucheoun Macky of Far, Donald Macky his son, 
William Sutherland of Duffus, George Murray of Spanzedaill, and David Eeid of Aickinheid, 
having been lawfully summoned and having failed to appear. 3 

In 1601 the whole of the lands of the bishop rick of Cathanes, including Skebo and others 
in the parish of Dornoch, were included in a new grant of the earldom of Sutherland by 
King James VI. to Earl John and his heirs male and of entail by the lady Anna Elphing- 
stoun his countess.* 

The episcopal city or town of Durnach (afterwards the burgh) is first noticed in record 
between the years 1127 and 1153, when King David I. granted his protection to the monks 
dwelling there. 5 It is next mentioned in Bishop Gilbert's charter of erection of the chapter 
(1203-1245), in which it is styled the city of Durnach. 6 In 1275 Bishop Archebald calls it 
his town of Durnach. 7 In 1503 the Scottish parliament ordained that a sheriff should be 
appointed called the sheriff of Catnes, who should have jurisdiction throughout the whole 
diocese, and should sit in Dornok or in Weik as the case required. 8 In 1505 Alexander 
of Moray was a bailie and burgess of Dornocht. 9 In 1509 King James IV. appointed Alex 
ander earl of Huntlie sheriff of the whole sheriffdom of Innernys, with power to appoint 
deputies and to hold courts within the bounds of Caithnes and other parts, and of sitting 
daily when necessary in certain towns, those in Caithnes being Weik and Dorno. 10 A deed 
dated at Dornoch in 1515 is witnessed by John and Murchard Murray burgesses of Dornoch. 11 
In 1529 a seisin of lands in Rogart is witnessed by Murchard Murray burgess of Dornoch, by 
his brother german Hugh (probably also a burgess), and by other two burgesses Ysaac Leslie 
and John Talyour. 12 In 1536 a discharge for the dues of certain towns was granted to John 
Murray of Cambussaffe in the manse of the chancellor of Cathanes within the city of Dornoch. 13 
In 1542 we find on an inquest touching the lands of William Sudirland of Duffos the names 
of Walter Leslie, Ferquhard M'Gillespy, Alexander Rater, and Alexander M'Culloch, inhabi 
tants of Dornocht. 14 In 1544 a charter is witnessed by Dauid Dyksoun citizen of Dornoch. ls 
In 1546 Murchard Murray (apparently the burgess of 1529) was a bailie of Dornoch. 16 In 

: Sutherland Charters. a Ibid. Ibid. 8 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. ii. pp. 242, 249, 250. 

1 Ibid. See GOLSPIE post. '> Sutherland Charters. 

5 Regist. de Dunfermelyn, p. 14. 10 Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xv. no. 63. Reg. Sec. Sig.. 

4 Sutherland Charters. See above, pp. 601, 602. vol. iii. fol. 204. " Sutherland Charters. 

Ibid. See p. 604. " Ibid. I3 Ibid. Ibid. ' 5 Ibid. 16 Ibid. 



DORNOCH.] PAKOCHIALES. 637 

1551 John Murray of Cambussawe burgess of Dornocht was deceased. 1 In the same year a 
payment of redemption money for Balnabrayt is witnessed by Valter Murray of Auchlwing, 
Murdoc Murray, Thomas Chesolme, Roderic Murray, and Alexander M'Culloch, burgesses of 
Dornoch. 2 In 1552 a charter by John Murray or Neilsone citizen of Dornoch is witnessed by 
Walter Leslie, Thomas Sutherland, or Kennochson, David Dickesoun, and John Talveour, citizens, 
and by Gillepatrick Tailyeour sergeant. 3 In 1566 seisin of the dean's stall was witnessed by 
Thomas Murray and Robert Mathesone burgesses of Dornoch. 4 The town of Dornoch was 
burned in 1567 by Y Macky of Far, and in 1570 together with the cathedral by the master 
of Caithness and the same Y Macky. 5 In 1583 appears Angus Poison citizen of Dornoch/' 
In 1606 an agreement was made at Over Pronsie between William Sutherland of Duffus and 
the bailies and community of Dornoch, with the consent of their overlord John earl of Suther 
land, by which both parties chose Hucheouu M'Ky of Far, George Sinclair of May, and George 
Monro of Tarrel, to ' sight' the marches between the town of Dornoch and the lands and baronies 
of Skelbo and Pronsie both property and common. 7 The arbiters decided ' that the comon 
hie gate that passes betuix the lands of Auchthtoiche and the cistmost feild of Nether Pronsie 
passand vp to Raghan sal be ane speciall proper merche betuix the saidis landis comontie and 
properties of the toune of Dornoche and the litle townes and subvrbs thairabout haldin of the 
kirk and the said baronie of Pronsie on the eist part and the said litle hill and sliding callit 
Rachan to be ane proper meithe and merche of the saidis toune of Dornoch and kirklandis 
forsaidis at the north syde and all that is beeist the said gate and feild of Rachan to be as 
propertie to the said towne of Dornoche and vtheris suburbs forsaidis and the haill landis 
and vtheris lyand bewest the said gate and feild of Rachan to be ane proper part and pertinent 
apertening to the saidis barones of Pronsie and Skelbo the comon moore about Rachan vpon 
the eist and north parts of the gate to be comontie to baith the saidis parties landis quhill they 
cum to the proper merchis of Coule and Indboll and all pasturages beest and benorth the 
saidis meithis of Rachan to be comon to baith the saidis parties except corne feild landis and 
hand (hained) feildis and gressings.' 8 In 1628 (14 July) King Charles I. on the narrative that 
his city of Dornoch was the only city of the earldom and country of Sutherland to which beyond 
the memory of man all the inhabitants of that country flocked as to a common emporium to 
purchase the necessaries of life ; that, as a place built near the seashore, it had a fit station 
for a harbour for the importation and exportation of merchandise ; that it was expedient that 
it should be erected into a free royal burgh and free port for the use of his lieges in that 
part, which might be of much use in reducing the barbarous and uncultivated mountaineers 
to civilization ; and seeing that the country and earldom of Sutherland extending to 60 miles 
had much need of a free burgh within their bounds erected the burgh and city of Durnoch, 
with all its lands, tenements, houses, buildings, roods, and ' outsettis,' together with the station 
and port of the same, into a free royal burgh and port, reserving to John earl of Sutherland 
and his heirs male and successors their hereditary right in the said lands and other pertinents, 

: Sutherland Charters. 5 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, pp. 150, 156. 

- Ibid. See above, p. 615. c Sutherland Charters. 

3 Ibid. Ibid. ' Ibid. 8 Ibid. 

VOL. II. 4 M 



638 ORIGINES [DOEXOCH. 

to be held of them as formerly or as the earl and his heirs might please to appoint, with the 
yearly dues specified in their infeftments, the entries of their tenants, and all their other here 
ditary rights as superiors of the burgh lands, houses, mosses, and other subjects ; with power 
to the community to elect a provost, four bailies, a dean of guild, a treasurer, and twelve coun 
cillors, and to elect also commissioners to parliament ; and with power to the magistrates to 
build a market cross and a tolbooth or prison, and to have a weekly market on Saturday, and 
three yearly fairs to be held for three days each, one beginning on 20 July, another on 20 
August, and the third on 10 October, with all the small customs of those fairs ; and with power 
also to build the harbour and station of Dornoch cum fulcimento et propiignaculis ' lie schoir 
et peir,' and to levy all the small customs of the same, with anchorages, ' lie dockmaill,' and 
other privileges the magistrates and community paying yearly to the king 40s. as burgh cess 
(census) with the usual burgh service. 1 Sir Robert Gordon, writing about that period, says 
of Dornoch 'It is situat betuein the rivers of Portnecouter and Vnes, and is the cheeff burgh 
and seat of the shirreffs of Southerlancl, wher all the hornings and inhibitions are registred, 
and all denunciations made and proclamations red. About this toun along the sea coast ther 
are the fairest and largest linkes or green feilds of any pairt of Scotland, fitt for archery, goffing, 
ryding, and all other exercise; they doe suqjasse the feilds of Montrose or St. Andrews. In 
the toun of Dornogh ther ar four fairs kept yeirlie, Sanct Gilbert his fair, Sanct Barr his fair, 
Sanct Margaret's fair, and Sanct Bernard's fayre, vnto the which ther resorteth a great confluence 
of people to traffique from all pairts of the kingdome. St. Gilbert his fayre is keipt yeirlie 
the first day of Aprile, St. Margaret's fayre is keipt yeirlie the tuentie daye of Julie, St. Bernard 
his fayre is keipt yeirlie the tuentie daye of August, and St. Barr his fayre wes keipt in former 
tymes the tuentie-fyfth day of September, bot Alexander erle of Southerland procured it to 
be transferred and removed from the 2oth day of September to the tenth day of October. 
Everie one of these fairs continues for the space of thrie dayes.' 2 His continuator informs us 
that ' this year of God, one thousand six hundredth thirty-one, there was a busines of the earl 
of Southerland's finished which cost Sir Robert Gordon much paines and travell to compasse 
for the space of seaven years together both at court and before the commission of surrenders 
since the same was established : the matter was the setling of the shriffship-regalitie of Souther- 
land, and enlarging the bounds of the shriflship of Southerland, and the dismembering off" it 
from the shirriffdome of Invernes, and getting the town of Dornogh to be made the head burgh 
of the shire in all time coming.' 3 In 1G41 the parliament passed fin act changing the yearly 
fair held at the royal burgh of Durnoch on 10 October to one to begin on 22 October, to 
continue for three days, and to be called Saint Gilbert Fair, because the former fair was hurtful 
to the burgh and its neighbourhood ' be catting and destroyeing thair comes thane being vpone 
the grund and vsuallie win nor lead at the tyme thairof.'* In 1G47 parliament confirmed an 
agreement (dated 9 February) between John earl of Sutherland and Thomas Mansone comtnis- 

1 Sutherland Charters. ' In the nioneth of Julie the sent home then into Scotland to passe vnder the Create 

yeir of God 1628 Sir Robert Gordoun procured from scale.' Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 406. 
his Majestic at London the privilege of a burgh royall 2 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, pp. 6. 7. 
to the toun of Dornogh in Southerland with divers 3 Ibid., pp. 450, 4.51. 
priviledges conteaned in that gift: which Sir Robert ' Acta Parl. Scot., vol. v. p. 4o3. 



DORXOCH.] PAEOCHIALES. 639 

sioner for the burgh of Dornoch for himself and the magistrates and community, whereby the 
earl agreed to remove to Dornoch the fair called Andersmes market, formerly held at Golspie, 
to begin on 20 November and last for three days, and all the other markets held within the 
earldom of Sutherland, the customs to be uplifted for the use of the burgh. 1 In 1655 an 
agreement was made at Dornoch between Alexander Lord Duflus on one part and John Dempster 
and William Gordoun bailies of the burgh of Dornoch on the other part to the following effect 
The bailies, council and community acknowledged that, although for years they had cast and 
led peats and turfs on the said lord's lands of Pronssie and Evileck, they had no right to do so 
except by toleration of him and his predecessors ; on which acknowledgment, and for the favour 
he bore to the burgh and community, Lord Duffus granted to them during his lifetime the liberty 
to cast, win, and lead peats and turfs within the said baronies ' benorth and beeast Rachan, and 
from Rachan straicht westward by the Billhead of Carney to the hill of Rierquhar from thence 
straight westward to Lochlavachie and to the north of the saids bounds as also vpoun the 
southe and west of the lands of Evileck bewest and besowth the water thairof allenerlie within 
ane half quarter of ane myle to the arraball lands and haned grass of the saids lands of Evileck 
and Aisdill secluding and debarring the saids haill inhabitants of the said brughe from casting 
of peattis, truffes, fail, diffattis, or forgaige beeast the saids (lands) of Evileck (or) any part of 
Lonestutach at any tyme heirefter but licence and tollerance of the said lord, his heirs and 
successors' paying yearly within the burgh of Dornoch the sum of 20 Scots, beginning at 
Martimes following. 2 

In 1504 Andrew bishop of Cathanes granted to John Murray in heritage the following 
lands and tenement with garden in the burgh of Dornoch and without, namely the lands 
called Auchinecloieh, having the lands called Cragge on the south, Pronsenaiii on the west, 
the common pasture on the north, and the lands of Pitgrode on the east and a tenement 
with garden, having the common street on the south, the common road on the west, the 
cemetery of Saint Fynbar lineally on the north, and the tenement of Gillemechell M'Bathe on 
the east of which lands and tenement the donation belonged to the bishop plena jure 
the grantee paying yearly 4d. for each rood of the tenement. 3 In 1535 John Murray 
resigned the burgh lands of Achloich in the hands of Alexander Murray bailie of Dornoch 
in favour of his friend and kinsman Walter Murray, reserving the liferent to himself. 4 In 
1537 Master Alexander Sutherland dean of Cathanes resigned to Bishop Andrew all right 
which he had to the lands of Achloch, and especially Reuencronich, in favour of Walter Murray 
burgess of Dornoch. 5 In 1570 Walter Murray of Achcloch burgess of Dornoch resigned in 
the hands of Robert M'Rathe bailie the lands of Achcloch in favour of his son John Murray 
and his heirs, reserving the liferent of the fourth part of the lands to Jonet Sutherland his 
wife. 6 In 1584 (6 December) Walter Murray in Drumdewan and his wife Issobell Murray 

1 Sutherland Charters. M'Talyonr, and John M'Ane M'Alexander, burgesses 

2 Ibid. 3 Ibid. and neighbours of the burgh of Dornoch. 5 Ibid. 
4 Ibid, This resignation is witnessed by Walter 6 Ibid. Witnessed by John Sanderson in Dornoch 

Lesly, Gorre Neilsone, Alexander Gar, Farchard and Walter Murray sergeant (officiarius) of Dornoch. 



(540 ORIGINES [DORNOCH. 

bound themselves and their heirs to resign to Alexander earl of Sutherland and his heirs all 
right to the lands of Achloche lying in the diocese of Caythnes and sheriffdom of Innernes, 
which they might have or might between the above date and Whitsunday following purchase 
of John Murray in Achloche and Agnes M'Craith his wife, within twenty days after obtaining 
that right, and on what security the earl should choose in return for which the earl promised 
to secure to Walter and his wife the lands of Drumdewan in exchange for those of Achloche 
and it was agreed that, should either party be injured by the exchange, the injury should 
be submitted to the judgement of neutral men and repaired accordingly. 1 In 1592 (12 August) 
by a contract made at the He of Broray between Alexander earl of Sutherland, John Murray 
of Auehloych, and Adam Gordoun of Golspiekirktoun, it was arranged as follows 1. John 
Murray, with the consent of his son Angus Murray, fear of the lands of Auehloych, and 
of his wife Agnes M'Krayth liferenter, sold to the earl and his wife Dame Jene Gordoun, and 
to their heirs got between them, with remainder to the earl's heirs whomsoever, the town and 
lands of Auehloych in the diocese of Cathenes and sheritlilom of Innernes, to be held of 
the superior by resignation or confirmation as the earl might choose engaging to give the 
grantees charter and seisin of the lands between the above date and the next feast of Saint 
Bar (25 September), and to deliver to them before that feast all his evidents of the lands, 
and also the reversion and wadset of the same on the sum of 300 marks belonging to Adam 
Gordoun. 2. The earl in lieu of the above became bound to infeft John Murray in the lands of 
Dawachfyn in the same diocese and sheriffdom before the said feast of Saint Bar, and to pay 
to Adam Gordoun for John Murray as the price of the reversion to the lands of Auehloych 
200 marks before Whitsunday 1593, and also before that date the remaining 100 marks 
in lieu of which last John Murray became bound on being infeft in the lands of Dawachfyn 
to infeft the earl and his lady in a yearly revenue of 5 bolls of ' sufficient cherateit victuall 
with the inett and mesure of Leyth' from those lands between 25 March and 1 May, beginning 
in 1593, and continuing till the said yearly revenue should be lawfully redeemed by his payment 
of the said 100 marks. 3. As Adam Gordoun and John Murray had reckoned for the rent due 
to Adam for the lands of Auehloych, the latter discharged John Murray of all rents due before 
1593, except 100 marks due for the years 1591 and 1592, which sum the earl on John Murray's 
behalf promised to pay John Murray in lieu of the same further became bound to infeft the 
earl, his lady, and their heirs in another yearly revenue of 5 bolls ' sufficient cherateit victuall ' 
from the lands of Dawachfyn till lawfully redeemed and the earl on the other hand for the 
redemption of the same engaged to give John Murray a letter of reversion on 200 marks 
Scots to be paid to the earl, his lady, and their heirs within the cathedral church of Dornocli 
on 40 days warning before any term of Whitsunday, which sum in case of absence or refusal 
should be consigned to any responsible landed man dwelling in Dornoch for the use of 
the earl, provided it should not be lawful for John Murray to redeem the said yearly revenue 
till he should pay the whole rents due along with the 200 marks. 2 On 18 October 1592 

1 Sutherland Charters. - Ibid. ' Cherateit' is ' winnowed.' 



DORNOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 641 

tlie earl granted to John Murray in Aucliincloych and his heirs the lands of Dawachfyn. 1 
On 19 October at Dunrobin John Murray further engaged, in case himself or his heirs should be 
obliged to sell or otherwise dispose of his heritable right to the lands of Dawachfyn, to give the 
earl the first offer of them on such reasonable terms as others within Sutherland would give 
for the same. 2 On 20 October he received seisin of the lands. 3 

In 1512 (4 May), on inquest made in court at Dornoch, Eoderic Murray, John Murray, 
Donald Murray, Andrew Cambell, Eodric Jonsone, Alexander Wrycht, Andrew Pantour, 
Donald Taylour, Donald M'Gillemor, Henry Johnesono, Henry Burges, William Johnesone, 
John Ancrani, Thomas Blair, and William Mathesone, declared that Alexander Murray the 
father of Sir Thomas Murray died last vest and seised in certain crofts and tenements in the 
town of Dornoch, as the charter of Alexander Murray more at length bore, and also in two 
crofts formerly belonging to Paul Burges, all in the earldom of Suthirland and sheriffdom of 
Innernes, and held in chief of the bishop of Cathanes, and that Sir Thomas was the lawful 
heir of Alexander and of lawful age.* On 7 July Sir Thomas was seised in the same. 5 In 
1515 the same Sir Thomas Murray, then precentor of the cathedral church, and the heir of 
his deceased father who was a burgess of Dornoch, in a court held at the market cross by- 
Andrew bishop of Cathanes, resigned all his hereditary lands, to be named in a charter after 
wards to be made, reserving the liferent and the bishop immediately went to a tenement of 
those lands lying near the market cross, and gave seisin of them to John Murray the brother 
german of Sir Thomas, in whose favour they were resigned. 6 

In 1524, on the mandate of John Ostelar, seisin was given to Say Lesly in a tenement in 
Dornoch between the king's common road and the burn, and witnessed by Rodric M'Ane Duf, 
William M'Ayne Oyr, John Murray, and Farchard M'Talyour, burgesses and neighbours of 
Dornoch, and by John Awloch mair. 7 

In 1545 John Murray of Cambussave, William Murray of Spanzedaill, John Poilsone of 
Creichemoir, Alexander Murray of Begos, Sir Robert Makraith vicar of Kilmalie, Farquhard 
M'Intailyour, Thomas Kenycochsone, Thomas Murray, Walter Murray, John Tailyour, Alex 
ander M'Culloch, William M'Ane Moir, Alexander Gar, Murquhard Murray, Walter Lesley, 
John Awloche, and Donald M'Dauid Blair, fellow-burgesses and fellow-neighbours of the 
burgh of Dornoch, in name of the community granted to their fellow-burgess Thomas Mowfti- 
a waste piece of land of their commonly lying within the king's high way leading to the 
Innoche on the east, the Blechinghill on the south, the common ford of the burn running 
before and through the burgh on the north, and the said burn wholly on the west, paying 
yearly to the bailies of Dornoch the sum of 4d. Scots in the name of burgh ferme. 8 In 1567 
Mariot Mowat the daughter and heiress of the deceased Thomas Mowate was seised in the 
same piece of ground. 9 

In 1557, as we have seen, Robert bishop of Cathanes granted his tofts, crofts, acres, and 
tenements of the city of Dornoch to John earl of Sutherland, and in 1564 admitted the earl's 

1 Sutherland Charters. 2 Ibid. 3 Ibid. s Ibid. Witnessed by John M'Brady sergeant of the 

4 Ibid. s ibjd 6 jbid 7 jbid. burgh. * Ibid. 



842 OKIGINES [DOENOCH. 

son Alexander as hereditary tenant of the same. 1 In 1601 the crofts and tenements within 
the city of Dornoch, the ' assy is aill and thoill' of that city, and the superiority of the same, 
formerly belonging to the bishop, were included in a new grant of the earldom of Sutherland 
by King James VI. to Earl John. 2 

In 1562 Kobert Duf alias M'Donald M'Dauid burgess of Dornoch for a certain sum of 
money sold to Alexander Murray or Angussone also a burgess a house in Dornoch, namely, 
the Kill, measuring in length 56 feet and in breadth 22 feet, as appeared, lying in his tenement 
at the foot of the bridge, and having his garden on the south, the common road on the north, 
the water of Dornoch on the west, and the said garden on the east, with the house built upon 
the same, to be held in burgage at the usual rate, with power to repair and roof the same, and 
especially on the south side next his garden, to the extent of three feet when required.* 

In 1568 Alexander Murray of Balleknok bailie of Dornoch gave seisin to John Murray the 
son and heir of the deceased John M'Donald M'Murquhe in a tenement or house lying within 
that city between the cemetery of Saint Findbar of Dornoch on the west, the burn or water 
of Dornoch on the east, the common road on the south, and the tenement of Master Thomas 
Braydy on the north.* 

In 1568 a charter by Thomas Murray burgess of Dornoch, granting to his son John crofts 
and other subjects round the city, names the croft of Sir Hugh Kennedy knight, Croft Anna- 
bill, Croft Nicll, Croft Mowden, the hill called Knoknaheglis, and Doynefad. 5 In 1618 John 
Murray of Abirscors granted in heritage to "Walter Murray the son of the deceased John Murray 
in Spainzedaill, and to Margaret Bayne his wife, the town and lands of Ballone otherwise 
called Fynnieblair, the lands called Croftowile, Doanefad, and Loquharie, the lands of Croftlarie 
and Belloroft, the lands of Doanefad and Barnesegen, the lands called the Tolme (or Colme) 
with the tail of the same, the lands of Doanechouina, and his tenements and dwellings in 
Dornoche, with the garden and other pertinents belonging to him in heritage, and all other 
tenements, houses, and buildings erected or to be erected thereon, all lying within the immu 
nity of Dornoch, earldom of Suthirland, and regality of the same. 6 In 1633 (6 November), 
on a mandate of King Charles I., John earl of Sutherland granted in heritage to George 
Kos portioner of Pittcarie, the croft called Croftmauld lying on the south side of the burgli of 
Domoche, with the tenement, barn, and garden in the upper part of the same, between the 
Bletchinghill of the burgh on the east, the croft of Thomas Ratter on the west, the lands of 
John Chisholme on the south, and the common road on the north also the croft called 
Croftowlay with the tenement and garden in the upper part of the same, lying on the south 
of the burgh between the croft called Croftmauld on the east, the Delwingis on the south, the 
croft called Gunneris Croft on the west, and the common road on the north also the croft 
called Gunneris Croft or the croft of the deceased Donafd Tailyour, lying on the south side of 

1 Sutherland Charters. See above, pp. 610,611, 613. bert M'Donald M'Dauid, and Walter Murray sergeant 

-Ibid. See GOLSPIE post. (aliens) of Dornoch. 6 Protocol Book of William Gray. 

' Ibid. 6 Sutherland Charters. The immunity here named 

' Ibid. Witnessed by William Clerk ' sutor,' Ro- is probably the ' girth,' noticed above, pp. 607, 60S. 



DORNOCH.] PAKOCHIALES. 643 

the burgh between the croft called the croft of Thomas Ratter then belonging to Sir Alexander 
Gordoun on the east, the croft called the Delvingis sometime belonging to the heirs of the 
said deceased John Chisholme on the south, the croft called Croftphaill then belonging to Sir 
John Gordoun baronet on the west, and the common road on the north and the croft called 
the Delwingis with its pertinents, lying on the south side of the burgh between the crofts 
called Croftmauld, Croftowlay, and Gunneris Croft on the north, the common road on the east, 
the common pasture or seashore on the south, and the said croft called Croftphaill on the 
west all lying in the earldom and sheriffdom of Sutherland, and all formerly belonging to the 
deceased Robert Monro commissary of Cathanes, and on 22 November last apprised from his 
maternal cousin Robert Sutherland (-who had been lawfully summoned to show himself heir to 
George Ros) by a decree of the Lords of Council in favour of George for the sum of 1885 
marks Scots and 92 marks as sheriff's fee the grantee paying yearly 20s. Scots, and Robert 
Sutherland to have regress to the above on payment of the sum for which they were apprised, 
saving the right of the earl and his heirs. 1 In 1059 Robert Gray of Arbo granted in heritage 
to George M'Culloch the croft of land called Croftphaill or Croftmore extending to 5 tolls 
2 firlots of bear, lying on the south side of Dornoch between the land called the Chantoure* 
Croft on the west, the land called Guners Croft on the east, the tenement of land, the barn, 
and yard of John Polsone sometime heritor of the said croft on the north, and the lands called 
the Delveingis on the south, together with the said dwelling, house, barn, and yard, being for 
the time ruinous and waste, all lying in the burgh of Dornoch and in the earldom and sheriff 
dom of Southerland. 2 

In 1573 Alexander M 'William M'Ane Moir was seised in certain crofts at Dornoch bounded 
by the hill called Knoklot, 3 

In 1574 Alexander earl of Sutherland, by a deed dated at Edinburgh 7 August, promised 
to pay to Luke Wilsoun burgess of Edinburgh and his wife Katherine Vddart, and to their 
heirs, executors, or assignees, the sum of 1000 Scots within the burgh of Edinburgh by 
Whitsunday 1575, and acknowledged receipt of 500 marks from Luke for ' outredding' of 
his affairs ; in return for which the earl engaged to infeft Luke and his wife and heirs in 
a yearly revenue of 50 marks Scots from his lands called the sixpenny lauds of Innerbo (or 
Indbo) in the earldom of Suderland and sheriffdom of Innernes, under reversion on payment 
of the said sum of 500 marks with all dues in the parish church of Edinburgh, giving as his 
sureties Robert Abircromye and Clement Tor burgesses of Edinburgh ; and Luke Wilsoun 
thereupon discharged the earl, as the son and heir of the deceased John earl of Suderland 
and the deceased Dame Elenour Stevart countess of Arroll and Suderland, of all debts due 
by them to Luke.* In 1592 John Gordoun in Clyntredlen granted to Alexander earl of 
Sutherland reversion to a yearly revenue of 50 marks to be paid at Whitsunday and Martinmas, 
sold to him by the earl, on payment of 500 marks Scots in one day within the cathedral 
church of Dornoch. 5 

1 Sutherland Charters. - Ibid. 3 Protocol Book of William Gray. * Sutherland Charters. - Ibid. 



644 ORIGINES [DOENOCH. 

In 1575 Alexander Kenate burgess of Banff, as the procurator of Catharine Eeid the wife 
of Master Alexander Dunbar dean of Moray, and of Thomas Dunbar their lawful son, on a 
mandate of Alexander earl of Sutherland took seisin of a house in Dornoch called ' the vicar 
of Kilmaleis chalmer.' 1 In 1630 Angus Angussone burgess of Dornoch granted in liferent to 
Jannet Kinros his future wife his dwelling-house on the north side of the burgh of Dornoch 
and on the west side of his tenement formerly belonging to Sir Kobert M'Craith vicar of Culmalie 
on the north side of the cemetery of Saint Fimber, with that part of his garden and the outer 
house of the same lineally joined from south to north, lying between the king's highway on the 
south, his tenement of land sometime belonging to the deceased Alexander M'Craithe of Inbo 
on which the new stone foundation called the Castle was built on the west, the common road 
on the north, and the rest of his tenement and garden with the buildings erected within the said 
bounds as far as the tenement of the deceased Thomas Wyre on the east also his said tenement 
lying on the north side of the burgh sometime belonging to Kobert M'Craith vicar of Culmalie, with 
the garden, kiln, houses, and buildings on the same, as they lay in length and breadth between 
the tenement of the said deceased Thomas Wyre on the east ; his said tenement formerly belonging 
to the said deceased Alexander M'Craithe of Inbo and James M'Eaith his son, on which the said 
new stone foundation called the Castle was built, with the garden of the same, on the west ; and 
the king's highway or vennel of the said burgh on the south and north in the diocese of Cathanes 
and sheriffdom of Sutherland the grantee paying to John earl of Sutherland at Whitsunday, 
if asked, in name of feuferme, 12d. Scots for the house with part of the garden and outer house 
of the same, and 3s. 4d. Scots for the tenements with garden, kiln, and other buildings. 2 

In 1576 Alexander Murray of Balliknok conveyed to his son Angus his new ' bwithe' with 
a small ' bwithe,' house, and stable, in the city of Dornoch. 3 

In 1603 (22 August) Barbara Matheson, the only daughter and heiress of the deceased Eobert 
Matheson sadler and burgess of Dundie, with the consent of her husband Andro Ramsay tailor 
and burgess of the same, appointed Donald Makphail citizen of Dornoch her procurator to obtain 
for her by precept of dare constat from [George] Glaidstanis bishop of Kaitneis infeftment in a 
tenement of land lying in the town of Dorno ' betuix the commoun gait of the said toune at the 
north, the kirkyard of Dorno at the cist, and the commoun kingis gait at the west and south 
pairtis,' and to resign the same in favour of William Sanderson bailie of Dornoch and his heirs 
in terms of a contract between the said William and herself and husband.* On 22 November 
an inquest was held in the tolbooth of the burgh of Dornoch by the following burgesses, namely, 
Donald Makphaill, Richard Murray, Alexander M'Kraith, William Clunes, Alexander Clark, 
Alexander Murray, Thomas Veir, Thomas Ratter, George Dicksone, Thomas Fiddes, William 
Murray M'Kane M'Kwatt, Thomas Murray Angussone, and John Murray M'Kwatt, who 
declared that the deceased Robert Mathesone sadler of the said burgh, the father of Barbara 
Mathesone, died last vest and seised in the dwelling (mansio) commonly called the Bischopis 
Lichting Place with the houses and buildings erected on the same, lying on the west side of the 

Protocol Book of William Gray. 3 Protocol Book of William Grny. 

- Sutherland Charters. 4 Sutherland Charters. 



BORSOCH.] PAROCHIALES. 645 

burgh between the common roads on the south, west, and north, and the cemetery of the church 
of Saint Gilbert on the east, and that she was his lawful heir and of lawful age. 1 In 1606 
Master Alexander Forbes bishop of Cathanes, for the good service done by William Sandesone 
citizen of Dornoch, granted to him in heritage the Bischopis Lichting Place for the yearly 
payment of 3s. 4d. Scots. 2 

In 1627 Alexander Murray, the lawful son of the deceased John Murray in Dornoch, was 
served heir to his uncle William Murray in a tenement of land with a garden lying on the east 
side of Dornoch in the sheriffdom of Innernes, of the extent of one penny. 3 

In 1660, on a precept by John earl of Sutherland, Alexander Gordoun burgess of Dornoche 
and his heirs were seised in a tenement of land and garden adjacent, lying within the Castleclos 
of Dornoche. 4 In 1669, by a contract made at Dornoch on 14 July between Robert Mansone 
burgess, with the consent of his wife Anne Papley, and George M'Culloch in Achindeane late 
bailie of Dornoch, Kobert and his wife acknowledged receipt of 241 Scots from George 
M'Culloch, and as security for the same sold to him and to his heirs ' that tenement of land 
and yaird in Dornoch contigue lyand on the sowth syde therof, having the tenement of land 
sum tyme pertening to Farquhair M'Intailyeour at the sowth, the commone calsey and vennalls 
of the said burgh at the east and north pairtis, and the Castleyaird, Castleclosse, and tenement 
therein at the west pairts,' lying in the sheriffdom of Sutherland, under reversion on payment 
of the said 241 Scots, and for the yearly payment of 20 Scots. 5 

From the above notices and other sources it appears that the city or burgh of Dornoch was 
formerly of much larger extent than at present. 6 The burgh cross, apparently of some 
antiquity, though broken, has been repaired, and still occupies its old site on the north of the 
cemetery of Saint Gilbert. 7 Beside it stood the townhouse or prison, mentioned by Pennant 
in 1769, and taken down in 1813. 8 Fairs were formerly held in the churchyard, which was 
unenclosed, and through which in the end of the last century the public road passed. 9 The 
burn so often noticed in the charters of burgh property intersects the town from north to 
south, and immediately to the east of the churchyard was crossed by the bridge (also mentioned 
in charters, but now superseded by another), and at other three points by stepping stones 
corresponding to the roads or lanes. 10 Of the sites of the canons' houses, all or most of which 
seem to have been extant in 1769, only two are now remembered, the house of the canon of 
Clyne (the dean) at the east end of the town, and the house of the canon of Criech (the chanter) 
on the south-east, now the site of the Caledonian Bank. 11 Some of the names of the canons' 
crofts or fields, such as Auchintreasurich and Auchinchanter, still survive. 12 

At the arrangement between William earl of Sutherland and Bishop Archcbald in 1275, as 
we have seen, the castle of Schythebolle (Skibo) and six davachs of land adjacent to it were 

1 Sutherland Charters. 2 Ibid. 8 Pennant, vol. iii. p. 361. Sketch by R. S. Taylor 

3 Eetours. Esquire. Notes taken on spot 185-1. 

1 Sutherland Charters. 5 Ibid. 9 Old Stat Ace. Note by R. S. Taylor Esqnire. 
6 Sketch and notes by R. S. Taylor Esquire. Notes 10 Sketch and notes by R. S. Taylor Esquire. Notes 

taken on the spot 1854. on spot 1854. " Ibid. Pennant, vol. iii. p. 188. 

" New Stat. Ace. Notes on spot 1854. ' 2 New Stat. Ace. Notes on spot 1854. 

VOL. II. 4 N 



646 OEIGINES [DOBNOCII. 

ceded to the bishop. 1 The castle was thenceforth a principal residence of the bishops of 
Caithness, but we hear no more of it till about the year 1544, when it was taken by Macky 
of Strathnaver and afterwards retaken by Captain James Cullen. 2 Skebocastell with the 
castle (that is apparently the castle and the six davachs around it) appears, as we have seen, in 
grants by the bishop dated 1560, 1564, and 1577, and in the new grant of the earldom of 
Sutherland in 1601. 3 In 1650 the marquis of Montrose is said to have been confined for 
two days in the castle of Skibo after his capture in Assint. 4 In 1769 the castle was modernised 
and habitable, but was subsequently taken down. 5 

The castle of Skelbole (anciently Scelbol, Skclbotil, or Skcllcbolc, and now Skelbo) was, 
as we have seen, granted to Gilbert Mudy by his brother Bishop William in 1455, and 
confirmed by King James III. in 1478. 6 In 1494 (1 July) the Lords of Council decided 
that John earl of Suthirland and his accomplices had done wrong in taking and withholding 
the castle and place of Skelbo and also two children of John of Murray, and ordained that 
he should deliver the castle to Thomas Kynnard of that ilk to be held by him according to 
his charter and seisin which he had produced before the Lords, that he should immediately 
set the children at liberty, and should pay to Thomas Kynnard 100 marks Scots for his 
' dampnag and scathis' as proved in court. 7 As to other goods contained in the summons the 
Lords continued the case till 8 October following, ordaining that the witnesses should be 
dismissed and new witnesses summoned. 8 In the same year (15 December) William Keth 
appeared before the Lords Auditors as procurator for Marjory Mowait the widow of the 
deceased John of Kynnard, demanding redress for the injury done her by Thomas of Kynnard 
in ' falsing' the charters and letters made to her of the castell and place of Skelbo, 9 Marjory 
Mowat at the same time sued Alexander Murray, Johne of Murray his son, and Thomas 
Kynnard for wrongously withholding from her the castle and place of Skelbow and occupying 
and labouring the demesne lands of the same for that year, and for withholding the dues. 10 
Thomas Kynnard alleged that the charter and seisin of conjunct infeftmcnt of the said castle 
and lands made to John of Kynnard and Marjory by the deceased Alane Kynnard of that ilk, 
dated 15 January 1486 (1487) in presence of Master Walter Kynnard, Archibald Brothy, 
Michell Murray, Huchon Monroo, Adam Brothy, William Murray, and Alexander Brothy, 
were false and sealed after Alane's decease. 11 The Lords Auditors therefore assigned to Thomas 
Kynnard the 13th day of March following to ' fals' the said charters and seisin civilly by the 
witnesses contained in the same infeftment ; and, as some of those witnesses were alleged to 
be unwell and unable for a journey, they ordained with the consent of the parties that Sir 
John Atnisfuld and one called Auchinlek public notaries in Dornoch should take the depositions 
of the sick witnesses and forward them under their seals by the day appointed. 12 In 1518 

1 See above, p. 603. * Pennant, vol. iii. p. 361. New Stat. Ace. 

2 Pennant, vol. iii. p. 361. New Stat Ace. Genea- 6 See above, p. GOT. 

logy of tlie Earls of Sutherland, pp. Ill, 112. See " Acta Dom. Cone., p. 348. 

above, p. 609. Ibid. 

3 See above, pp. 613, 614, 636. Acta Dom. And., p. 203. 

4 Genealogy of the Earls, p. 555. New Stat. Ace. > Ibid., p. 204. "Ibid. 12 Ibid. 



DORNOCH.] PAKOCHIALES. 647 

Andrew Kynnard of that ilk took seisin of the lands and castle of Skelbo at the top of the 
stair ascending to the tower of the castle. 1 In 1525 John Kynnard the son of the deceased 
Andrew took seisin of the same castle and lands in the hall of the castle. 2 In 1529, as we 
have seen, when John Kynnard sold the lands and castle to William Suthirland of Duffus, his 
bailie John Murray of Campbussay received as evidence of the seisin a black ox with grey 
horns. 3 In 1545 Master John Sutherland appears as captain of Skelbo.* In grants or 
confirmations of the barony, dated in 1555, 1562, 15G3, and 1566, the castle was included, 
and in some cases appointed the chief messuage of the barony. 5 In 1564 a transaction between 
Alexander Suthirland of Duffus, his son James, and James's foster father Angus Suthirland 
Hectorsone, was done in Alexander Suthirland's ' chalmer within the castell of Skelbo.' 6 In 
1616 William Sutherland of DufFus was served heir to his father William in the demesne lands, 
tower, and fortalice of Skelbo. 7 The castle, situated on Loch Fleet near the Little Ferry, is 
now a mere ruin, but still exhibits traces of its former size and strength. 8 

In some of the above notices appears the bishop's castle or palace of Dornoch. 9 In 1570 
it was held for some time together with the steeple of the cathedral by the Murrays against 
the Master of Caithness, after the latter had burned the cathedral and the town. 10 Part of 
it still remains on the south side of the square or place in the middle of which the cathedral 
stands. 11 Till the beginning of the present century it was surrounded by a court and wall, 
in the inside of which were vaults or booths used as shops or dwellinghouses. 12 The court 
and a lane either on the east or on the west side of the wall were probably the Castleyaird 
and Castleclos noticed in the titles of certain tenements. 13 The new foundation called the Castle 
appears to have stood on a different site. 14 The use and even the name of the Bischopis 
Lichting Place are now locally unknown. 15 

Pennant in 1769 mentions Embo, an old building, the seat of the knights of Embo. lc 
' A litle by east the toun of Dornogh their is a monument in forme and structure lyk 
a croce, called Craske-Worwarre, that is, the thaine or erle his croce. Ther is another besyd 
Enbo about a mile from Dornoch, called Rie-Crosse, that is the king's crosse, in the which place 
one of the kings or commanders of Denmark was slain and buried.' 17 

I Sutherland Charters. - Ibid. 16 Tour, vol. iii. p. 361. 

3 Ibid. See p. 630. " Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 7. The 

4 Regist. Moraviense, p. 402. cross at Embo, which no longer exists, was traditionally 

5 Sutherland Charters. See pp. 631-634. ascribed to the 13th century, and said to commemorate 

6 Protocol Book of William Gray. a battle between William earl of Sutherland and the 

7 Retours. See p. 634. Danes, in which the king of the Danes was slain. The 

8 Notes taken in 1854. 9 See pp. 611, 614, 615. cross or obelisk near Dornoch, evidently of a much 
10 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 156. later date, bears on each side a shield with three stars, 

II Notes taken in 1854. and is still called the Thane's Cross, but is frequently 

12 Sketch and notes by R. S. Taylor Esquire. confounded with that which stood at Embo. It is so 

13 See p. 645. " See p. 644. 15 See pp. 644, 645. confounded by Pennant, vol. iii. pp. 188, 361. 



G48 ORIGINES [GOLSPIE. 



GOLSPIE. 

Culmalin 1 Culmaly 2 Kilinale 3 Kilnialy* Kilmalie 5 Kylmalie 6 
Culmale 7 Kilmalze 8 Culmalze 9 Kilmailze 10 Kilmaillie 11 Col- 
malie 12 _ Culmalie 13 Golspie. 14 (Map, No. 2.) 

THIS parish, separated from Dornoch by Loch Fleet and its outlet the Little Ferry, extends in 
a north east direction about 8 miles along the Dornoch Firth, and forms an oblong generally 
equal in breadth to the length of Loch Fleet. The upper part is hilly with a few small lakes, 
and the lower comparatively level and arable, including the links, a large tract composed of a series 
of ancient seabeaches with intervening spaces, at one time overblown with sand, which has since 
to a great extent been covered with mould, greensward, heath, and other vegetation. The 
wooded glen of Dunrobin with its cascade on the burn of Golspie forms a scene of great beauty. 
In 1471 a deed of inquest made in the head court of John earl of Suthirlaud and in his 
presence was sealed for some of the parties with the seal of Sir Alexander K (probably Eattir) 
vicar of Culmalin. 15 In 1512 a transaction done at the castle of Dunrabyn was witnessed by 
Master Malcolm Rathar vicar of Culmaly. 16 In 1515 Master Malcolm appears to have resigned 
the vicarage of Culmaly, and to have been appointed vicar of Latheroun. 17 Sir Robert 
M'Raith, probably appointed his successor in the same year, appears as vicar of Culmaly in 
1524 and 1529. 18 In 1532 Master Alexander llattar is styled vicar of Kilmale. 19 In 1536 
Master Robert M'Raith (evidently the same as Sir Robert) was vicar. 20 In 1545 the same 
Sir Robert appears as vicar, and Alexander Rattar as parish clerk. 21 In 1546 (29 April) a 
charter is witnessed by the same Sir Robert as vicar, by Sir Robert Fern curate, and by 
Alexander Rattar parish clerk. 22 In the same year (13 October) a seisin of the earldom is 
witnessed by one surnamed Fern, and styled either pensionary or penitentiary of Culmale. 23 

1 A. D. 1471. Fors Charters. '- A. J). 1580. Ibid. 

-A. D. 1512. Sutherland Charters. A. D. 1515. "A.D. 163U. Ibid. 

Ibid. A.D. 1524. Ibid. A. D. 1529. Ibid. A.D. 14 A.D. 1602. Acta Parl. Scot, vol. vii. p. 390. 

1545. Ibid. A. D. 1552. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxv. l5 Fors Charters. Richard Fossard parson of Ivil- 

t'ol. 3. malyn, who in 129C swore fealty to King Edward of 

3 A. D. 1532. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 67. A. D. England, may have been parson of this parish. See 

1549. Sutherland Charters. A. D. 155!. Ibid. KILMAUE, p. 180. 

1 A. D. 1536. Sutherland Charters. A. D. 1546. 16 Sutherland Charters. 

Ibid. A.D. 1549. Ibid. A. D. 1558. Ibid. A.D. ' 7 Ibid. "Ibid. 

1501-66. Book of Assumptions.; >'> Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. ix. fol. 67. This notice is er- 

5 A.D. 1545. Sutherland Charters. A.D. 1551. roneously applied to the parish of Kilmalie in the 
Ibid. diocese of Argyle. See p. 180. 

6 A. D. 1546. Ibid. ' Sutherland Charters. 

7 A. D. 1546. Ibid. 8 A. D. 1565. Ibid. 21 Ibid. Seisin of the lands of Auchinloug is wit- 
1J Circa A. D. 1569. Register of Ministers. m-sscd by Alexander Rattar parish clerk.and by Thomas 

10 A. D. 1574. Book of Assignations. Gray, William Makynnane, and Thomas Makewin. 

11 A. D. 157S. Sutherland Charters. laymen. Ibid. * n, i(1- 



GOLSPIE.] PAROCHIALES. 649 

In the same year (10 December) Sir Robert Feme again appears as curate of Kylmalie. 1 Sir 
Robert M'Raith again appears as vicar in 1549, 1551, 1552, 1558, 1559, and 1565." In 
the last year (8 August) Henrie and Marie king and queen of Scots granted for life to their 
daily servitor James Dauidsoun Kintyre Pursevant the vicarage of Kilmalze, with the manse, 
glebe, and kirkland, vacant by the decease of Sir Robert Makcraith. 3 In 1569 Sir Robert Feme 
(apparently the curate of 1546) was exhorter at Culmalze, and in 1574, 1577, and 1578 he 
was reader. 4 In 1578 James Dauidsoun vicar of Kilmaillie, with the consent of the bishop 
and chapter, leased to John master of Sutherland and his heirs for 19 years from Alhallowmes 
1579 the vicarage of Kilmaillie, with the fruits, rents, teinds, teindfish, wool, lamb, butter, 
cheese, teindstirk, staig, and other emoluments ' corps presentis, vmaist claythis, Paschefynis, 
and oblationis, alwayis according to the ordour taikin heiranent exceptit' reserving also the 
glebe and manse to the readers ; the lessee paying yearly 10 Scots at Alhallowmes and Peax, 
namely, 6, 13s. 4d. as two-thirds to the vicar, and 3, 6s. 8d. as one-third to Sir Robert Feme 
reader at the kirk of Kilmaillie or any other reader there. 5 In 1581 (4 February) Robert earl of 
Marche, commendator of the priory of Saint Andrews, and bishop of Cathnes, with the consent 
of his dean and chapter, for the sum of 2000 Scots paid to him by Alexander earl of Sutherland, 
leased for life to the earl, to his lady Dame Jean Gordoun, and to their son and apparent heir 
John master of Sutherland, and after their decease for 19 years to the master's heirs and as 
signees, the teindsheaves of the parishes of Loth and Colmalie, the latter including those of Wppet, 
Innerboll, Mellak, Claysyid, Dunrobin, the Glen of Dunrobin, Allertoun, Bakeis, Golspitour, 
Golspimoir, Golspikirktoune, Ruiffis, Drummoy, Colinalimoir, Colmaliecraigtoun, Eister Aherscors, 
and Westir Aberscors, with entry at Lambes 1581, the lessee paying yearly 120 marks Scots. 6 
In 1662, on a petition by Lord Strathnaver the son of the earl of Sutherland, and the report of 
their commission, the parliament found that during the vacancy of the church of Golspk- 
(1649-1653) the stipend had been applied by the presbytery to pious uses." 

The church (probably dedicated to a saint whose name is corrupted to Garden) stood at 
Kilmaly, corruptly Culmalie, and now known as Kirktown, where its cemetery, enclosed, but 
disused and overgrown with weeds, and the remainder of its north wall, may still be seen.' 1 The 
wall is 81 feet long, about 7^ feet high, and 3^ feet thick. 9 The eastern portion, 26^ feet long, 
seems a later but very old addition, and has within 12^ feet of its eastern termination a 
semicircular arched recess in length 7 feet. 10 In the other and older part of the wall is a slab 
of hewn stone, with an inscription bearing that the dilapidated cemetery contains the bodies of 
many of the earls of Sutherland, a modern fancy which has no foundation in fact. 11 In 1611) 
the place of worship was changed to the village of Golspie, two miles eastward from Kilmaiv, 

1 Sutherland Charters. ' Acta Parl. Scot., vol. vii. p. 390. 

- Ibid. Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxv. fol. 3. Book of As- B Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 79. Old 
sumptions. The notice from the Reg. Sec. Sig. is Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. Notes on spot 1K54. 
erroneously given under Kilmalie. See p. 180. 9 Measurement taken in 1864. 

1 Sutherland Charters. . "> Ibid. 

* Register of Ministers. Book of A ssignations. " Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. Notes taken on 
3 Sutherland Charters. 6 Ibid. spot 1854. See Genealogy of the Earls passim. 



650 OEIGINES [GOLSPIE. 

and the site of the chapel of Saint Andrew mentioned below. 1 The present church, which 
is cruciform, is said to have been built in 1738, and to have had an aisle added in 1751. 2 Mr. 
Neale, writing in 1848, says, ' The church, which is cross, is on old foundations, but nothing 
ancient remains except the rood staircases.' 3 

In the year 1330, on the day following the feast of Saint Nicholas, Kenneth earl of Suthyr- 
land granted a charter to Eeginald of Moray of Culbyn at the chapel of Saint Andrew of 
Goldespy.* Between 1399 and 1408 Kobert earl of Suthirland by a deed dated at the chapel 
of Saint Andrew granted to Henry of Suthirland the lands of Thurboll, resigned there by 
Henry's father Nicholas of Suthirland lord of the castle of Duffhus. 5 In 1448 John earl of 
Suthirland presented Sir Alexander of Eatir to the perpetual chaplainry of Saint Andrew the 
apostle of Golspi then vacant, and specially to the town of Drommoy, with the crofts and lands 
around the chapel and the croft upon the hill between the burns. 6 In 1451 Robert of Suthir 
land, the son and heir of John of Suthirland of Fors, granted to the perpetual chaplain of 
' Sant Androwis chapell of Golspy' 40s. Scots yearly from the mails of the town of Drommy 
(Drommoy), ' for to pray for me and the sawlys off my forbearis and successouris.' 7 In 1509 
the advowson of the chaplainry of Golspy was included in a retour of the earldom of Suther 
land in favour of John Sutherland the son and heir of the deceased Earl John. 8 In 1515 
(31 August) Adam Gordoun earl of Suthirland presented Sir Eobert M'Eaith chaplain to the 
chaplainry of Saint Andrew of Golspy in the parish of Culmaly, vacant by the resignation of 
Master Malcolm Eattir. 9 In the same year (18 September) Andrew bishop of Cathanes granted 
collation of the chaplainry to the procurator of Sir Eobert M'Eaith. 10 About the year 1550, 
during the absence of earl John, John Southerland, the son of Alexander who, as will after 
wards appear, laid claim to the earldom, came with a party to Golspikirktoun, intending to 
attack Alexander Gordoun the earl's brother, to whom he had committed the rule of the earl 
dom, and who was then at worship in the chapel ; but he, having learned their approach, went 
out to meet them, on which they dispersed. 11 In 1556 John earl of Suthirland, with the consent 
of his wife Elizabeth Stewart countess of Erole and Sudirland, granted to his faithful servitor 
Sir Eichard Maddir priest the chaplainry of Saint Andrew with the lands and crofts of the same, 
when vacant by the consent of Sir Eobert M'Eayth then chaplain or in whatever other way 
committing to him the cure, government, and administration of the same Sir Eichard doing 
the funeral rites (exequias) and other services according to the foundation of the chaplainry, 

1 Old Stat. Ace. New Stat. Ace. Genealogy of the of the parish and neir the house of Dunrobin.' Genea- 

Earls of Sutherland, pp. 9, 361. Neale's Ecclesio- logy, p. 361. 

logical Notes, p. 67. ' At this tyme also Sir Robert 2 New Stat. Ace. 

Gordoun interprysed the building and repairing of the 3 Eccles. Notes, p. 67. Those staircases are now gone, 

parish churches of Southerland, being almost all ruinous Mr. Neale does not seem to have been aware that the 

to the ground, which in end he brought to passe, and ' old foundations' were those of a chapel, or that the 

began with Golspiekirktoun. Sir Robert with consent parisli church was at Kilmaly. 

of the bishop and of the parishioners did appoynt the 4 Sutherland Charters. 

same to be the parish church and the place of meitting 5 Ibid. 6 Ibid. ' Ibid, 

for divyne service, which wes befor this tyme at Kil- 8 Ibid. 9 Ibid. '" Ibid, 

maly Kirktoun, seing Golspie church is in the midst u Genealogy of the Earls, p. 132. 



GOLSPIE.] PAROCHIALES. 651 

together with the service and worship (seruitio et diuinis) due and wont within the palace or 
fortalice of Dunrobin when possible besides the cure and service of the chaplainry according to 
the same foundation. 1 Sir Robert M'Crayth, who, as we have seen, was vicar of Kihnaly, 
appears to have held the chaplainry till his death in 1565. 2 In 1566, under the designation of 
the benefice of Saint Andrew called Golspiekirktoun, the advowson of the chaplainry was 
included in a new grant of the earldom of Sutherland made by Queen Mary to Earl John.'' 
In 1570 Richard Maddir chaplain of the chaplainry of Saint Andrew of Gospye, with the con 
sent of the patron Alexander earl of Suthirland then a minor, of Barbara Sinclar countess of 
Suthirland his wife, and of the earl's curators Robert bishop of Cathanes and Alexander Suthir 
land of Duffous, for certain sums of money paid to him by Gilbert Mill and for other favours, 
granted to Gilbert in heritage his chaplainry of Golspe with its lands, fields, crofts, tofts, houses, 
and buildings, and with the yearly revenues of the town of Drommoy and of the boat of the 
port or ferry of Vnis, lying within Suthirland in the sheriffdom of Innernes, extending yearly 
in his rental to the sum of 10 Scots the grantee paying yearly that sum with 16 pence in 
augmentation of the rental.* In 1575 (16 February) Sir Richard renewed the grant of the 
chaplainry to Gilbert Milne, who on 23 February took seisin of the same. 5 In 1583 (15 March) 
Gilbert Milne, fear of the town and lands of Golspykirktoun, with the yearly revenues of the 
town and lands of Drummoy extending to 40s., and the privilege of the ferryboat of Vnis, 
in fulfilment of a contract with Adam Gordoun of Culgour dated at Dornoch 3 March 1582 
(1583), with the consent of Edward Kennety the son of John Kennetie burgess of Bamfe, 
chaplain of the chaplainry of Saint Andrew of Golspy, and with the consent of the same John 
the tutor of his son Edward, and of the patron Alexander earl of Sutherland, granted to Adam 
Gordoun and to his wife Cristina Murray the daughter of Hugh Murray of Aberscors, and to 
the heirs got between them, with remainder to Adam's heirs whomsoever, the town and lands of 
Golspykirktoun, with the annual rents of Drummoy extending to 40s. Scots, and the privilege 
of the ferryboat of the port of Vnis, with the rest of their pertinents, belonging to the chap 
lainry of Saint Andrew of Golspykirktoun in the earldom of Sutherland and sheriffdom of 
Innernes, for a certain sum of money paid to him by Adam in his necessity to be held of the 
chaplain and of the earl and of their successors for the yearly payment of 10 old ferme with 
16d. in augmentation seisin taken on the lands of Golspykirktoun to be sufficient for tin- 
whole. 6 In the same year (18 April) Alexander earl of Sutherland confirmed the grant. 7 In 
1592 Adam Gordoun of Golspiekirktoun appears as a party to a contract with the same earl and 
John Murray of Auchloych. 8 In 1617 his son Alexander, styled of Golspiekirktoune, witnesses 
a seisin of the earldom of Sutherland. 9 In 1626 the same Adam (apparently), with the consent 
of his eldest son Alexander fear of Golspiekirktoun, and of his (apparently Alexander's) wife 

1 Sutherland Charters. Ibid. The grant is signed by Gilbert Mylne, 

' l Book of Assumptions. Sutherland Charters. Edvart Kennayte cheplan of Golspy, and Alexander 

1 Sutherland Charters. 4 Ibid. erll off Sutherland. 

5 Ibid. The seisin is witnessed by William Mak- ? Ibid. 

lienrik in Golspyekirk. > Iliid. See DOBNOCH, p. 640. ' J Ibid. 



652 ORIGINES [GOLSPIE. 

Margaret Gordoun, for the sum of 2500 marks Scots paid to him by Sir Eobert Gordoun of 
that ilk baronet, tutor of Sutherland, sold to Sir Eobert and his heirs the ' chaplane landis of 
the towne and landis of Golspiekirktoun, with houss, biggingis, yairdis, toftis, croftis, annexis, 
connexis, dependenceis, partis, pendicles, and pertinentis thairof vsit and vont, togidder with the 
annuelrentis of the towne and landis of Drummoy extending to the sowme of fourtie sehillingis 
monie yeirlie to be vpliftit and tane furth of the saidis landis of Drummoy, with the priviledge 
of the passage boit and poirt of Vnis, with all and sindrie thair pertinentis quhatsumevir per- 
teneing to the chaplanrie of Sanct Andro of Golspiekirktoun,' to be held of the superior. 1 
Earl John who died in 1400, the lady of his son Earl John (the daughter of the Lord of the 
Isles) drowned at Vnes about the same date, her husband who died in 1508, and a son of the 
earl of Caithness poisoned by accident in 1567, were all buried at Golspiekirktoun. 2 The 
monument of the countess, ' with a ston curiouslie carved,' was extant in 1630. 3 

Between 1561 and 1566 the teindsheaves of the parish of Kilmaly were leased for the yearly 
pavment of 105, 15s. 4 About 1569 the exhorter at the church of Culmalze had as his stipend 
,">0 marks ' fra the bischope.' 5 In 1574 the reader had 16 and the kirklands, 'as part of which 
or in addition to it he had, as we have seen, in 1578 the third of the vicarage amounting 
to 3, 6s. 8d. 6 

Between 1561 and 1565 the chaplainry of Saint Andrew, as leased by Sir Robert M'Crayth 
vicar of Kilmaly, paid yearly 10, which, as we have seen, was the old valuation. 7 

The district anciently known as Sudrland (the south land of Catanes or Cateneys, in which 
it was included) extended from the range called the Mound or Mounth (apparently the same 
as the more ancient Eisteinsdal or Drumnahallestane (Drumalestane, Drumhallesdell), and ter 
minating at the south in the modern Hill of Ord) to the north bank of the river Oikel or 
Portnacoulter, known to the Norwegians as Ekkialsbakka, and a small tributary stream named 
Alde-ne-Gealgigh (probably the Goddgedlae of the Norse writers), thus excluding Assynt, Ed- 
derachylis, Durness, and Strathnaver or Farr, included in the modern earldom. 8 These excluded 
districts however seem to have been from an early age sometimes included under the name 
Sudrland. 9 Between the years 875 and 880 (apparently) Sigurd or Sward earl of Orkney, 
having formed an alliance with Thorstein the Red the son of Olaf the White king of Dublin, 
subdued Cathanes and Sudrland as far as Eckialdsbacka the boundary. 10 Earl Sigurd was slain 
about the year 880 in a battle with Mclbrigd a Scottish earl, and was buried at Eckialdsbacka. 11 

: Sutherland Charters. vol. iii. p. 350; Blaeu's Maps ; Macpherson's Geogra- 

J Genealogy of the Earls, pp. 75, 88, 147. pineal Illustrations; and Worsaae's Danes. 

' Ibid., p. 75. 4 Book of Assumptions. ' J Ibid. ' Sutherland, in Irish Catav, and Caitness, 

5 Register of Ministers. Gualav, were anciently called Catenesia cis et ultra 

'' Book of Assignations. Sutherland Charters. See montem, viz. Ord. In Irish cad is altus, high, and guael 

p. 649. 7 Book of Assumptions. See p. 651. is hmnilis, low, plain. And so Catav (from cad, high. 

' See the following notices from Torfaeus and the and taobh. or tav, a side) is the high side of the Ord, 

Orkueyinga Saga; and also Innes's Critical Essay, A pp. and Giialavisihe low side of it.' Shaw's Moray, p. 50. 

No. 1 ; Miscellany of the Maitland Club, vol. iv. part i ; lu Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 4. Antiquitates Celto-Scandicse, 

Keg. de Dunfernielyn, p. 14 ; Ford. Scot., lib. viii. c. 59 ; p. 5. The latter authority places this event circa 895. 

Buch. Hist., lib. i.cc. 30, 31 ; Genealogy of the Earls of and translates Ekkjalsbakka mantes Ochellenses. 

Sutherland, pp. 1-18: Sutherland Charters; Pennant, " Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 4. Worsaae's Danes, p. 259. 



GOLSPIE.] PAROCHIALES. 653 

Between 941 and 969 Liot, the son of Thorflnn Hausakliuf earl of Orkney, defeated his brother 
Skul and a Scottish army in the Dales of Catanes, and occupied the whole district, but, bein? 
afterwards attacked by another Scottish army under an earl named Magbrad (probably Malbrieid 
the brother of Finnleikr Jarl the Scot) in the Scidensian marshes a tract of Catanes (said to b<- 
the neighbourhood of Loch Shin in Sutherland), although victorious, he died in a few days of 
his wounds. 1 Between 969 and 995 his grandson Earl Sigurd the Gross, besides holding 
Catanes against Kenneth III. king of Scotland, is said to have ruled Moray, Ross, Sudrland, 
and Dale. 2 Being challenged by the Earl Finnleic (Finnleikr Jarl) to battle on a certain day 
at the Scidensian marsh, having received from his mother a charmed standard, and having 
restored to his subjects of the Orkneys their allodial lands, Earl Sigurd met and defeated Earl 
Fiunleic after losing three standard-bearers. 3 In 1014 Earl Sigurd was slain in battle in Ireland, 
and Thorfin, his son by a daughter of King Malcolm II., then only 5 years old, received from 
his grandfather Malcolm Katanes and Sudrland with the title of earl, and men to assist him 
in his rule. 4 About the year 1034 Karl Hundason, styled by the Norse writers king of Scot 
land, demanded of Earl Thorfin that he should pay tribute for Katanes, and the earl, claiming 
Katanes as the gift of his grandfather, refused, on which war arose between them. 5 King Karl 
created his sister's son Moddan earl of Katanes, with the intention of giving him the rule of 
that country, and Moddan having raised an army in Sudrland, Thorfin raised one in Katanes, 
and, assisted also by troops from Orkney, caused Moddan to retire, subdued Sudrland and Eos, 
and overran several other parts of Scotland. 6 About the year 1036 Earl Thorfin frequently 
dwelt in Katanes at Goddgedlae, where, says the Orkneyinga Saga, Scotland and England 
march." Earl Thorfln retained during life the whole of his dominions, namely, nine earldoms 
in Scotland, all the Hebrides, and a large territory in Ireland, and died apparently in 1064. s 
The rule of Katanes and Sudrland appears to have been held successively by Paul the son of 
Thorfin, Haco the son of Paul, and Harald the son of Haco, the last of whom died in 1135. 9 

1 Tort'aens, lib. i. c. 9. Macpherson's Geog. Illust. 6 Ork. Saga, p. 31. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 13. For the 

See DING WALL, p. 485. sequel of this war see CANKISBAY post. 

- Torfaeus, lib. i.e. 10. Orkneyinga Saga, p. 7. Dale, ~ Ork. Saga, p. 55. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 14. Cum, 

or the Dales of Catanes, is usually applied to the dis- says Torfaeus, caeteroqnin in Calanesia Gaddgedlif 

trict of Halkirk. The above notice seems to distinguish Thorfinrms plerumque resident, urbisne an praedii 

it from both Catanes and Sudrland. If the distinction nescio, loci certe nomen eft, inque finibus Catanesiae 

is correct, Dale must apply to Assynt, Edderachylis, quaerendum. The place may probably have been Alde- 

Durness, and Strathnaver, or some particular part of ne-Gealgigh near the Oikel (Genealogy of the Earls of 

those districts. Sutherland, p. 8. Old Stat. Ace. See ASSYNT) 

3 Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 10. This battle is probably the and the probability is strengthened by the fact that 
*ame as that of Creich, dated by Sir Robert Gordon in during the war above noticed Moddan led an army 
1031, and fought between his imaginary thane Alane into Katanes through the Highlands (per superiorem 
Southerland and the Danes and Norwegians who had Scotiam), when be may have crossed the Oikel near 
settled in Moray. the same spot. 

4 Orueyinga Saga, pp. 5, 27. Torfaeus, lib. i.cc. 10, 12. s Ork. Saga, p. 87. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 15. Buchanan, 

5 Ork. Saga, p. 31. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 13. For an and after him Sir Robert Gordon, mention a thane of 
explanation of the name and story of Karl Hundason Sutherland (named Alane by Sir Robert) who was put 
see the chapter of Torfaeus just cited, and the Irish to death by Macbeth between 1046 and 1057. Buch. 
version of Nennius published by the Irish Archaeo- Hist., lib. vii. c. 85. Genealogy of the Earls, p. 23. 
logical Society, notes, pp. Ixxxii, Ixxxiii. 9 Ork. Saga, p. 141, 147. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 19. 

VOL. II. 4 O 



G54 



OEIGINES 



[GOLSPIE. 



It scorns to have boon afterwards a subject of dispute between Earl Paul the brother of Harald 
and Earl Bognvald (afterwards sainted). 1 In 1137 Sveinn Asleifson, a turbulent leader of that 
period, went into Orkney, seized Earl Paul, sailed by the Breidafiord (the Moray Firth) to 
Eckialsbaka, and leaving there a ship with 20 men went with the rest of his followers to Maddad 
earl of Atjoklis (Athole) and his wife Margaret the sister of Earl Paul. 2 Earl Paul soon after 
died or was murdered, and in 1139 Harald the son of Earl Maddad (and thence styled Harald 
Maddadson), by the joint consent of Earl Rognvald, Sveinn Asleifson, William bishop of Orkney, 
and a bishop named John said to be from Atjoklis in Scotland, was admitted (when only o years 
old) as the colleague of Earl Rognvald an arrangement which is said to have been afterwards 
confirmed at a meeting held in Katanes by the oaths of the nobles of Orkney and Scotland. 3 
In the same year Sudrland was overrun and laid waste by Sveinn the son of Asleif.* The 
two earls seem to have ruled jointly but not always cordially till the death of Earl Rognvald 
in 1159, when Harald became sole earl. 5 He was thenceforth styled earl of Catenes and 
Orkney, or earl of Orkney, Hetland, and Catanes. G Between the years 1196 and 1202 he 
had war with King William the Lion, who at length marched into Katanes and encamped with 
a large army at Eisteinsdal the boundary between Katanes (proper) and Sudrland, on which 
the earl after consulting with the inhabitants made peace on condition that they should pay 
the king yearly a fourth of all their possessions and reimburse certain persons who had fled 
to the king to escape the earl's vengeance. 7 Earl Harald died in 1206, and his sons David 
and John, who ruled jointly, both died (John by violence) in the year 1231. 8 

Between the years 1203 and 1214 Hugh Freskyn held the land or territory of Suthyrland 
of King William the Lion. 9 He appears to have died about the year 1214, and before 1222 his 
son and heir William lord of Suthyrland held the same territory of the crown. 10 Between 
1222 and 1229 King Alexander II. in consequence of the murder of Adam bishop of Cathanes 
passed into Ros, Suthyrland, and Catenes 'to do justice.' 11 William lord of Suthyrland seems 
to have been for some time known both as Sir William of Moray and William of Suthyrland. 12 
He appears to have been created earl by King Alexander II. about 1237, and was undoubtedly 



1 Ork. Saga, pp. 109-219. Torfaeus, lib. i. cc. 21-25. 

2 Ork. Saga, p. 219. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 25. 

3 Ork. Saga, p. 221-231. Torfaeus, lib. i. cc. 25, 26. 

4 Ork. Saga, p. 235. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 26. 

5 Ork. Saga, p. 419. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 39. 

Epist. Innocent. III., lib. i. no. 218. Lib. Eccles. do 
Scon, p. 37. 

7 Ork. Saga, pp. 407-419. Torfaeus, lib. i. c. 38. 
Ford. Scot., lib. viii. cc. 59, (J2. For the history of this 
war see CANNISBAY post. 

K Chronica dc Mailros, pp. 106, 142. Ork. Saga, 
pp. 419, 421. Torfaeus, lib. i. cc. 39, 40; lib. ii. There 
is no evidence whatever to show that Earl Harald was 
forfeited. By his submission to King William he re 
tained the earldom, which was distinctly held also by 
his sons. 

9 Sutherland Charters. Hugh was the son of Fres 
kyn, a person of unknown origin, who in the reigns of 



King David I., King Malcolm IV., and King William, 
had extensive possessions in Linlithgow, Moray, and 
perhaps in Sutherland. The land of Suthyrland held 
by Hugh was apparently that already described as the 
original territory which bore the name. See Nisbet's 
Heraldry, app. p. 183, and Dalrymple's Collections, 
pp. 422, 423. Chalmers (Caledonia, vol. i. pp. 604, 605) 
confounds Hugh Freskyn with his nephew Hugh the 
son of William Freskyn. 

10 Sutherland Charters. 

11 Wyntoun, b. vii. c. 9. King Alexander is said 
to have given the earldom of North Caithness to 
Magnus the son of Gillibrid Earl of Angus, and to 
have taken from him the earldom of Sutherland. See 
Dalrymple's Collections, pref., p. Ixxiii ; Ork. Saga, 
appendix, p. 551 ; Lib. Ins. Miss., p. liii ; and CAN 
NISBAY post. 

12 Kegist. Moraviense, pp. 26, 81, 89, 133. 



GOLSPIE.J PAROCHIALES. 655 

the first earl of Sutherland. 1 Among the documents found in the king's treasury at Edinburgh 
in 1282 were two charters styled Carta de Suthirland and Alia carta Suthirlandie, both very 
probably referring to the erection of the earldom. 2 Earl William died in 1248 at the peace of 
King Alexander II., and was succeeded by William his son, then apparently a mere child. 3 In 
the year 1263 among the items of royal revenue Sir Laurence le Grant sheriff of Innernes 
accounted for the sum of 20 as part of the king's silver (finis) of the earl of Sutherland. 4 
In 1269 a charter by William earl of Eos was witnessed by William earl of Suthirland. 5 In 
1275, as we have seen, by an arrangement between Earl William and Archebald bishop of 
Cathanes the latter yielded to the earl the lands of Awelech, Promsy, Rutherhard, Haskesdale. 
Hachencosse, Thorebol, Kynalde, Largge, and Cuttheldawach, and granted to him also a davach 
or half a markland of Owenes, with the right of presenting a chaplain to the altar of Saint 
James in the church of Durnach. 6 Between that year and 1294 the same earl witnessed a grant 
of the lands of Tarradale in Ross by David of Innerlunan. 7 About the year 1284 he witnessed 
a grant of the lands of Culnacloych and Ruthtrelen in Strathbolgy, which were held of him by 
John of Moray the son of Sir Malcolm of Moray. 8 In 1284 he was one of the nobles of 
Scotland who bound themselves to support the title of Margaret the daughter of King Alexander 
III. to the throne. 9 In 1290 he joined in addressing a letter to King Edward I. in name of the 
community of Scotland, proposing marriage between Edward the son of that king and the Maid 
of Norway the grand-daughter of King Alexander III. 10 In 1296 he swore fealty to King 
Edward. 11 In 1297 that king addressed a mandate to the earl, giving him special thanks because 
he had always and especially in those days conducted himself well and faithfully in Scotland ; 
and enjoining him by his homage, faith, and love to King Edward and the peace of his kingdom, 
and by the full trust the king had in him seeing that the king had committed the guardianship 
of Scotland to Brian the son of Alan (who in 1296 had sworn fealty along with him) that 
he, continuing as he had in that part manfully and laudably begun from good to better, should 
persist in all things belonging to that guardianship with his horses and his arms and his whole 
power (posse), in order to repress the malice of the king's enemies in those parts as often as 
was necessary and he should be required by the said Brian. 12 The same earl is said to have 
fought in 1314 at Bannockburn on the side of King Robert Bruce. 13 It is certain that in 1320 
he signed the memorable letter of the Scottish barons to Pope John. 11 He is said to have 
been with Bruce at the battle of Byland in 1322. 15 He died in 1325, and was succeeded 
by his son Kenneth. 16 In 1330 the latter, styling himself Kenneth earl of Sutherland the 
son of the deceased William earl of Sutherland, made an agreement with Reginald of Moray 

1 Regist. Morav., p. 133. Sutherland Charters. 8 Regist. Moraviense, p. 462. 

Hailes' Additional Sutherland Case. 9 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. p. 82. I0 Ibid., p. 85. 

2 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. p. 4 post pref. Ragman Rolls, p. 119. 

3 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 33. Suther- I2 Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 50. 

land Charters. Caledonia, vol. i. p. 606. I3 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 39. 

* Compota Camerar., vol. i. pp. 21, 31*. u Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. p. 114. 

5 Regist. Moraviense, p. 279. 15 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 42. 

6 Sutherland Charters. See DORNOCH, p. 604. 16 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 44. Suther- 

7 Beauly Charters apud Macfarlane. laud Charters. Additional Sutherland Case. 



G5G ORIGINES [GOLSPIE. 

the son and heir of the deceased Alan of Moray of Culbyn concerning Reginald's lands in 
Suthyrland, and gave his daughter Eustachia in marriage to Reginald's son Gilbert of Moray. 1 
Earl Kenneth was slain in 1333 at the battle of Halidon-hill, which was fought contrary to 
his advice. 2 He several times renewed the fight, exposing himself where the danger was 
greatest, ' vntill,' says Sir Robert Gordon, ' he loosed all hope of victorie ; then, disdaining 
in any case to incurr either the infamie or suspition of cowardice, he resolved not to overlive 
so great dishonor as to sie his countrie in servitude vnder the dominion of a stranger ; thus, 
peremptorilie hazarding all and therwith his lyff, he lossed the same in the midest of his enemies 
with the pryce of a number of ther deaths.' 3 

William earl of Sutherland, who succeeded his father Kenneth, took an active part in the 
public affairs of the period in which he lived.* He is said to have been present with Sir Andrew 
Murray of Bothwell at the battle of Kilblane in 1335, was certainly a party in the incursion of 
the Scots into England in 1340 while King Edward III. besieged Tournay, and was in high favour 
with King David II., whose half-sister Margaret he married in 1344. 5 In 1345 King David 
granted to the earl and his wife Margaret, and to the heirs of their body, the earldom of 
Sutherland in free regality." The same king subsequently granted to the earl various lands 
in the counties of Forfar, Kincardine, Aberdeen, and Inverness. 7 They were both taken 
prisoners at the battle of Durham or Nevill's Cross in 1346, but the earl seems to have been 
soon after liberated. 8 He appears to have taken no part in the negotiations for the ransom of 
King David in the years 1348 and 1349." In 1351 (28 June) Earl William with the earls of 
Marche, Marre, and Angus, or any two or three of them, had a safe conduct from King Edward 
III. (to last till 15 August), in order that they might go with 40 horsemen in company to 
the town of Newcastle on Tyne to treat with certain of the king's lieges of matters enjoined 
on them by the king. 10 On 11 July King Edward empowered the bishop of Durham and others 
to prolong the term of safe conduct according to their discretion. 11 On 4 September William 
carl of Sotherland, the earls of Marche and Angos, the bishop of Saint Andrews, and William 
of Douglas, or any four, three, two, or one of them, had a safe conduct from the same king (to 
last till the fifteenth day after 2 February 1352) empowering them to go with 200 horsemen of 
whatever estate to David de Brus his prisoner, who was about to proceed to Scotland for certain 

1 Sutherland Charters. See DORNOCH, p. 027. p. 63, no. 53 ; p. 65, no. 15 ; p. 66, no. 2 ; p. HI, no. 157 ; 

- Buch. Hist., lib. ix. c. 14. Genealogy of the Earls p. WJ, no. 242. 

of Sutherland, p. 45. Hailes' Annals, app. no. iv. 6 Genealogy of the Earls, p. 50. Douglas's Peerage. 

:t Genealogy, p. 46. Hailes' Annals. In the list of the prisoners given by 

4 See the following notices. Hailes, app. no. vi., appears William of Moray, pro- 

Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland. Hailes' An- bably a son of the earl of Sutherland. The earl was 

nals. Douglas's Peerage. Additional Sutherland Case. perhaps liberated privately, as some prisoners were. 

8 Genealogy of the Earls, pp. 49, 53. Douglas's Rymer's Foedera, vol. v. pp. 532-537. Rotuli Scotiae, 

Peerage. Additional Sutherland Case, p. 10. Robert- vol. i. pp. (!77, 679. The same William of Moray 

son's Index, p. 32, no. 5. The charter containing this appears in a list of the Scotch prisoners to be brought 

grant was extant in the last century, and was produced to the Tower of London, 8 December 1346. Hot. Scot.. 

in the case of the Countess Elizabeth in 1770, but is not vol. i. p. 678. 

now in the charter chest at Dunrobin. ' J Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. pp. 714, 717, 718, 721-4, 

7 Genealogy of the Earls, pp. 53, 54. Rob. Index, 727. 

I'. :;_', no. 13; p. 33, no. 49; p. 39, no. 42; p. 49, 1. 26; ' Ibid., p. 741. " ibid., pp. 741, 742. 



GOLSPIE.] PAROCHIALES. 657 

causes touching his freedom, certain hostages liaving been first delivered to the king of England, 
to the place at which the exchange of David de Brus for those hostages should be made, to remain 
there, and then to return home in the train of Brus. 1 John the son and heir of the earl of 
Sothirland was one of the hostages for King David, to whom on 5 September King Edward 
granted a safe conduct (to last till a fortnight after 2 February) to go to Berewyc on Tweed if 
in his hands, otherwise to Newcastle on Tyne, with 100 horse, and there be exchanged for the 
king of Scots. 2 The hostages were ordered to be kept in the castles of York and Notingham. s 
Ascension Day (17 May) 1352 seems to have been at first fixed for the king's return to England, 
which was however delayed till the Quinzaine of Easter (22 or 23 May), on which day the hos 
tages were brought to Berewic and released. 4 In 1354 (18 June) the earl of Sotherland and 
others had a safe conduct from King Edward (to last till 22 July) to go to Newcastle upon Tyne 
to treat about the ransom of King David. 5 In the same year (5 October) a treaty was con 
cluded for a ransom of 90,000 marks sterling (to be paid in nine years at the rate of 10,000 
marks yearly on 2 February or its Quinzaine), for the payment of which King David became 
bound to send to England twenty hostages, of whom one was the son and heir of the earl of 
Sotherland. On 17 October the hostages had a safe conduct from King Edward for their 
journey to England. 7 The truce was broken early in 1355, and the treaty was consequently 
void. 8 In 1356 negotiations for peace and for the ransom of the king were renewed, and in 
1357 a new treaty was concluded. 9 On 1C August 1357 William earl of Sutherland, Thomas 
earl of Anegos, and Thomas earl of Morref, had a safe conduct from King Edward (to last till 
the Quinzaine of Saint Michael, 13 or 14 October) that they might go to Berewic on Tweed 
with CO horsemen and their grooms (garcionibus) to treat for the ransom of King David. 10 On 
the same day the earls of Sutherland, Anegos, and Morref, and twenty sons of Scottish noble 
men, had a safe conduct given them to go into England as hostages for King David's ransom 
the safe conduct to last till the Quinzaine of Easter following. 11 In September of the same 
year the Scottish parliament agreed to ransom the king for 100,000 marks sterling, to be paid 
at the rate of 10,000 yearly on 24 June ; and the earl of Sutherland was one of those who became 
surety for the payment, and John his son and heir was again to be given as a hostage. 12 On 
3 October the treaty was concluded by the commissioners of both nations at Berewic on 
Tweed. 13 John, the son and heir of the earl of Sothirland, was sent to London in company 
with his father to abide in the custody of the chancellor. 14 On 25 October 1357 John of 
Foderyghani, a familiar of the earl of Sutherland (then apparently in England), had a letter of 
safe conduct from King Edward till 24 July 1358. 15 In 1358 (25 October) Earl William, before 

1 Kotuli Scotiao, vol. i. p. 743. 2 Ibid., p. 744. Ibid. 

3 Ibid., p. 745. 4 Ibid., pp. 748 -75(1. 12 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. pp. 156-159. Rob. Index. 

5 Ibid., pp. 765, 766. 6 Ibid., p. 76S. pp. 107, 108, nn. 23, 25. Hailes' Annals. 

7 Ibid., p. 774. 13 Kotuli Scotiae, vol. i. pp. 811-814. Rob. ludtx, 

- Ibid., pp. 775, 776. Hailes' Annals. p. 107, no. 19. Hailes' Annals. 

B Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. pp. 791, 799, 803, 806. SIIK, " Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 814. Rymer's Focdeni. 

S09, 811-814. Hailes' Anna!*. vol. vi. p. 35. 
"' Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 809. lb Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 815. 



658 OKIGINES [GOLSPIE. 

visiting Scotland on business of his own, took oath in the chamber of the bishop of Winchester 
( Wyntoniensis) in Suthwork, in presence of the bishop, of Eichard earl of Arundell, of Guido 
de Bryan, of Roger of Beauchamp, of Edward of Saint John, and others, by the hand of 
John of Cherleton the king's chamberlain, that he would return to England by 2 February 1359 
at farthest. 1 On 26 October he received a safe conduct for the purpose. 2 His visit to Scotland 
was probably occasioned by the death of his wife Margaret, who appears to have died about that 
time. 3 In 1359 (1 April) King Edward III. granted a safe conduct to Nicholas of Cryghton, 
the familiar of William earl of Sutherland, and two horsemen his companions, sent into Scot 
land by the carl to expedite certain of his aifairs the safe conduct to last till 1 August. 4 On 
28 July John of Sutherland, Nicholas of Creghton, and Adam de la More (apparently the same 
parties), had from the same king a safe conduct for one year to go to England by sea or land. 5 
On 9 September the same king granted a safe conduct for one year to John of Croye clerk, 
a familiar of the earl of Sutherland, to go through his dominions into the parts beyond sea for 
expediting certain affairs of the earl at the court of Eome, and to return thence through 
England into the parts of Scotland. In 1360 (14 May) King Edward granted a safe conduct 
for one year to John of Sutherland and Nicholas of Creghton of Scotland to go into England 
with two servants and four horses to William earl of Sutherland, still abiding there as a hostage 
for King David. 7 On the same day he granted a safe conduct (to last till Christmas) to Adam 
de la More and John de Seint Clcr of Scotland to go to the earl with the same number of 
servants and horses. 8 On 28 November he gave a safe conduct (to last till Christmas) to 
Thomas of Nesbyt the familiar of the same earl with three horsemen of any estate in his train to 
go into Scotland on the earl's business. 9 In the same year Earl William was appointed ' executor- 
testamentar' to Thomas Fingask bishop of Catteynes. 10 It is said that John the earl's son and 
heir (styled by Fordun his only son), one of the hostages for King David, died of the plague at 
Lincoln about 8 September 1361. n In the same year (28 November) King Edward granted a 
safe conduct (to last till 24 June 13G2) to Robert of Catenesse the servant of the same earl to go 
to Scotland with two companions to expedite certain affairs of the earl. 12 In 1362 (23 January) 
the earl himself had a safe conduct from King Edward to go to Scotland on his own affairs in 
company with twelve horsemen, on condition that he should return to the city of London by 
15 May at farthest. 13 On 9 February King Edward granted a safe conduct (to last till 29 Sep 
tember) to John of Greneburn of Scotland to go into England to prosecute the affairs of the 
same earl. 14 On 28 April the earl's servant Robert of Catenesse had a safe conduct into Scot 
land for the same purpose and till the same day. 15 At the same time King Edward granted to 

1 Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 830. 2 ibid. 11 Ford. Scot., lib. xiv. c. 25. Hailes' Annals and 

3 Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 51. Additional Sutherland Case. This statement rests solely 
Douglas's Peerage. on the authority of Fordun or his continuator Bower. 

4 Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 837. Sir Robert Gordon makes John succeed his father in 

5 Ibid., p. 840. " Ibid., p. 841. 1370. See post. Lincoln is an evident mistake for 
7 Ibid., p. 848. " Ibid. London. 

' Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 852. 12 Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 858. 13 Ibid., p. 860. 

'" Genealogy of the Earls, p. 52. i* Ibid., p. 8G1. I5 Ibid., p. 863. 



GOLSPIE.] PAKOCHIALES. 659 

the earl, who had returned to England and was then at the city of York, an extension of the 
term of his safe conduct till 1 August, on which day he should be bound to return to London. 1 
On 30 April the king ordered Marmaduc le Conestable his sheriff of York and Henry of Ingelsby 
canon of the church of Saint Peter of York to take the earl's oath to that effect. 2 On 8 Novem 
ber Eobert of Catnes the earl's vallettus had a safe conduct to London in company with three 
horsemen till the following Whitsunday. 3 On 10 December Nicholas Sutherland of Scotland 
(probably the earl's brother) had from the same king a safe conduct into England for one year. 4 
Some time before 20 September 1363 King Edward had again given the earl of Sutherland 
leave of absence on his affairs till 29 September in company with twelve horsemen ; on 20 
September he extended that leave till Whitsunday 1364 ; and on 21 September ordered Ralph 
de Nevill to take the earl's oath that he should return to London by the day appointed. 5 On 
6 December the king granted to the same earl liberty to pass to and from Scotland with his 
twelve familiars both horse and foot as often as he pleased during the space of one year. 6 On 
the same day he granted the same liberty for the same term to Johanna countess of Sutherland 
with ten familiars both horse and foot. 7 On 6 December 1364 the countess had the same 
liberty for another year. 8 On 12 December King Edward extended the earl's leave of absence 
with the same following to the feast of Easter 1365, and from that to the same feast 1366. 9 
On the same day the earl's two valletti James of Stratton and Alexander Eameseye had from 
King Edward a safe conduct into Scotland with four horsemen in company for the space of one 
year. 10 On 6 May 1366 the same king granted his passport into England for a year in favour of 
Richard Mufford esquire (tcutifer) of the earl of Sutherland on the earl's affairs and in company 
with a single horseman. 11 On 11 May the earl's leave of absence was extended from the previous 
Easter to 29 September following. 12 On 16 October it was extended to 29 September 1367. 13 
On 28 January 1367 King Edward took under his protection and safe conduct for a year the 
person and property of William of Murrif the son of William earl of Sutherland, then abiding 
in England. 14 On 20 March the same king took under his protection and safe conduct for a year 
William earl of Sotherland, who had lately resided in London as a hostage for King David, and 
who by King Edward's license had returned to the parts of Scotland to dwell there for a certain 
time, and was then for the same purpose about to return to London with his wife Johanna and 
twenty horsemen in their train ; the earl's wife Johanna ; their horsemen and harness ; and 
their money, goods, and chattels of whatever sort. 15 Among the accounts deferred by the Scot 
tish parliament at their meeting at Scon in September 1367 till their meeting to be held in 
January 1368 was the sum of 15 in the hands of the earl of Suthirland to be accounted for of 
the retour of an assise of his earldom. 16 Earl William seems to have been finally released about 
this time, and is said to have died at Dunrobin in 1370 at the faith and peace of King David II. 17 " 

1 Rotuli Scotiac, vol. i.p. 863. 2 Ibid. 3 Ibid., p. 866. 10 Ibid. Ibid., p. 902. 

4 Ibid., p. 867. Sutherland Charters. J2 Ibid. 13 Ibid., p. 906. 

5 Rotuli Scotiae, vol. i. p. 874. 6 Ibid., p. 8/8. Ibid., p. 909. 15 Ibid., p. 911. 

7 Ibid. Johanna was countess of Strathearn. See 16 Acta Parl. Scot., vol. i. pp. 168, 169. 

Regist. ilorav., pref., p. xxxiv. n Douglass Peerage. Sutherland Charters (retour 

8 Rot. Scot., vol. i. p. 889. ' Ibid. of 1630). Genealogy of the Earls, p. 54. 



660 



OEIGINES 



[GOLSPIE. 



The next earl of whom we have any authentic notice was Eobert (apparently the son of 
William), who was earl of Suthirland on 2 November 1389, when he witnessed a decree 
arbitral by the bishops of Moray and Boss between Alexander Stewart earl of Buchan and 
his wife Eufame countess of Boss, and was one of the sureties given by that earl for his 
fulfilment of the sentence of the bishops. 1 He was succeeded by Earl Nicholas, who was 
undoubtedly the grandson of Earl William, and whose death is placed in 1399. 2 

Kobert apparently the son of Nicholas was earl on 22 January 1401, when he granted 
certain lands to his brother Kenneth. 3 He is said to have fought at the battle of Homildon 
in 1402, and between that year and 1408 to have been a party in an incursion of the Scots 
into England. 4 He died in 1442. 5 In 1444 his son John earl of Suthirland granted a 
charter of the lands of Thurboll dated at Pomfret in England. 6 In 1448, as we have seen, 
the same Earl John granted the ehaplainry of Golspi to Sir Alexander of Battir, and the deed 
was witnessed by his son Nicholas of Suthirland. 7 In 1456 (22 February) the same earl 
resigned the earldom, which King James II. then granted to John of Suthirland his son and 
apparent heir according to a charter to be made. 8 On 24 February accordingly the king 
sjranted the earldom in heritage to John of Suthirlande for payment of the usual services, 
reserving the liferent to the earl, and to Margaret his wife her conjunct infeftment in the 
two towns of Lothis, the lands of Cracok, Culnagoure, and Vfirglen, and her terce of the 
oarldom for life, with the farther condition that, should the earl die before his son, the ward 
and relief should be the king's notwithstanding the above grant. 9 This earl died in 1460, 
and was succeeded by his son John, who was infeft in the earldom in 1456, and who appears 

1 Registrum Moraviense, p. 354. Sutherland Char 
ters (retours of Ki30 afterwards cited). 

2 Sutherland Charters (retours of 1630). Genealogy 
of the Earls, p. 59. We have three accounts of this 
part of the succession, all differing from the account 
given above. 1. Sir Robert Gordon affirms that Earl 
William was succeeded by his son John, who according 
to Fordun died in 1361 and was never earl, and that 
F/arl Nicholas was the son of John. 2. Douglas in his 
Peerage follows Sir Robert Gordon in making John 
the immediate successor of William, and, giving John 
another son, the Robert of the Registrum Moraviense, 
makes this Robert die in 1389 and be succeeded by his 
brother Nicholas. 3. Lord Hailes, summarily rejecting 
both accounts, and founding on the notice of William 
of Murrif in 1367 and a notice of Kenneth the son of 
the deceased Earl William in 1408, creates William of 
.Murrif his father's successor in the earldom, omits Ro 
bert and Nicholas, and makes another Robert (who 
succeeded Nicholas) the son of William of Murrif. 
The trutli seems to lie in either of the following state 
ments 1. That William earl of Sutherland, who died 
in 1370, had four sons ; John his firstborn and for a time 
his only son, styled his son and heir, -who died before 
his father; William of Murrif, styled the son of Wil 
liam earl of Sutherland, and probably a natural son; 
Robert, who was carl in 1389 : and Kenneth, who was 



alive in 1408 or 2. That he had only three sons, and 
that the Earl Robert of 1389 and Earl Nicholas his 
successor, were the sons of John the master who died 
in 1361. See Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, 
pp. 54-59; Douglas's Peerage; Additional Sutherland 
Case, pp. 10-12; Fors Charters; and Sutherland Char 
ters (retours of 1030). Buchanan and after him Sir 
Robert Gordon name Earl William's son who died in 
England Alexander, and Sir Robert seems to have been 
totally ignorant of that earl's second marriage. The 
same authorities affirm that this imaginary Alexander 
was declared by King David II. to be heir to the 
crown, when that king repudiated Robert (also by 
Buchanan misnamed Alexander) Stewart his sister's 
son a statement which seems to have no foundation 
in fact. See Buchanan, book ix. c. 37, and Genealogy 
of the Earls, p. 51. 

3 Fors Charters. Genealogy of the Earls, p. 59. 

4 Genealogy of the Earls, pp. 60, 61. Sir Robert 
Gordon says that this incursion extended to Pomfret 
Castle, where Nicolas Suthirland of Duffus resigned to 
the earl the lands of Thorboll. That resignation, how 
ever, was made at the chapel of Saint Andrew of 
Golspy. Sutherland Charters. See post. 

5 Genealogy of the Earls, p. 70. 

6 Sutherland Charters. See DOKNOCH, p. 628. 

Ibid. See above, p. 050. " Ibid. 9 Ibid. 



GOLSPIE.J PAEOCHIALES. 661 

as earl in 1471 holding his head court (apparently at Dunrobin), and in 1472 as superior of 
the lands of Thureboll. 1 In 1488 Earl John is said to have been on his way to assist Kins; 
James / III. at the battle of Bannockburn or Sauchieburn, which was however fought before 
the earl arrived. 2 He again appears in record in 1494, and died in 1508 at the peace and 
faith of King James IV. 3 In 1509 (4 May) King James IV. directed to his sheriff and 
bailies of Innernes a brief of inquest of the chapel royal regarding the earldom in favour 
of Elizabeth Suthirland the daughter of the deceased John earl of Suthirland. 4 On 25 
July Master Gilbert Hay the attorney of John Sutherland the son and heir of the deceased 
John earl of Sutherland, and Adam Gordoun of Obin with Elizabeth Sutherland his wife the 
daughter of the deceased earl, appeared in the sheriff court of Innernys held in the tolbooth 
of that burgh by Thomas Patirson and James Donaldson the deputies of Alexander earl of 
Huntlve and Lord Badzenach sheriff principal, and presented the king's brief, requesting 
execution of the same, and asserting that the deceased John earl of Sutherland died last 
vest and seised in the earldom, with the castle of Dunrobin, the tenants, tenandries, 
and services of the free tenants of the earldom, and the advowson of the chaplainries of Golspy, 
Helmisdale, and Saint James in the cathedral church of Cathenes, and that John Sutherland 
his son was his lawful and nearest heir. In the same court appeared Alexander Sutherland also 
the son of the deceased earl, asking instruments against the brief and petition of John Sutherland, 
asserting that he had a hereditary right in the earldom, and requesting that, as he was a 
minor of about 18 years, curators in the case should be given him. The deputies accordingly 
appointed as his curators Andrew bishop of Cathanes and commendator of Fern, William earl 
of Cathanes, John master of Athole, Sir William Spyne provost of Thane, and Sir Thomas 
Kobertson rector of Assint. 7 The curators having advised with Alexander Sutherland, and 
having held a friendly conference with Master Gilbert Hay, Adam Gordoun, and Elizabeth 
Sutherland, both parties at length agreed that Alexander Sutherland should for a certain com 
position renounce his right to the earldom in favour of John and Elizabeth Sutherland and their 
heirs, saving his own right of succession in case their heirs should fail. 8 Accordingly Alexander 
with the consent of his curators immediately resigned his claim for a composition of 40 marklands, 
of which Adam Gordoun there in court gave him charter and seisin ; and the deputies then 
proceeded to the service of the brief. 9 In 1512 (24 December) Patrick Baize, the attorney of 
John Suderland the son and heir of the deceased John earl of Suderland, appeared before 
Duncan Eiche signifer the king's sheriff of Innernis in that part, and produced a brief of the 
chapel royal dated 6 August ; on which the sheriff went to the castle of Dunrabyn and gave 
seisin to the attorney in the earldom of Suderland, the castle of Dunrabyn, the tenants, 
tenandries, and services of free tenants of the earldom, and the advowson of the chaplainries 
of Golspy, Helmysdale, and Saint James in the cathedral church of Cathenes. 10 In 1514 (3 May) 
King James V. appointed William Lord Kuthven, John Lord Drummond, David Lyndesay 

1 Genealogy of the Earls, p. 75. Fors Charters. 3 Ibid., pp. 79, 83. Sutherland Charters. 
Sutherland Charters. 4 Sutherland Charters. 5 Ibid. 6 Ibid. 

2 Genealogy of the Earls, p. 79. ' Ibid. 8 Ibid. 3 Ibid. ' Ibid. 
VOL. II. 4 P 



662 ORIGINES [GOLSPIE. 

master of Crawfurd, Sir William Scott of Balwery, Sir David Lyndesay of Edzell, William Gray 
of Lour, Alexander Rede of Straloch, John Ross, and Walter Ross, his sheriffs of Innernes in 
that part, to execute a brief or briefs of idiotry (ydeotrie) of his chapel upon John earl of 
Suthirland. 1 On 9 May John Gordon of Halheid appeared before Alexander Blair provost 
and sheriff of the burgh of Perth, and John Donyng and Robert Bonkill bailies, and presented 
a brief of the chapel royal addressed to them and dated 5 May, to the effect that the king, 
understanding that the sheriffs of Innernes were not present in that part to give their oaths 
before the Lords of Council as to the due serving of the above brief of idiotry on John earl 
of Sutherland, charged the said provost and bailies immediately to take the oaths of the sheriffs. 2 
In obedience to the king's charge the provost and bailies immediately took oath of John Lord 
Drummond one of the vice-provosts of Innernes, there present, concerning the faithful admi 
nistration of justice in the case. 3 Lord Drummond then by the mouth of John Matheson 
mair of the sheriffdom of Perth caused the sheriff court of Inuernes to meet Sir Hugh Ros 
of Kilrawac, Sir John Cambell of Cavdar, Sir David Ros of Ballangovn, and David Dunbar of 
Durris, having been first summoned for their suits and presences and there appointed John 
Peblis and Robert Thomson notaries public clerks of court, Thomas Cuk dempster, and John 
Matheson, Andrew Cuk, James Wisman, and James Fydlar, mairs of the sheriffdom of Innernes 
in that part, and took their oaths de fideli administratione* Thereafter Lord Drummond pro 
ceeded to the market cross of Perth, and there by the mouth of John Mattheson one of the said 
mairs, in his own presence and in that of John Merschell one of the bailies of Perth, caused 
the brief of idiotry to be proclaimed ; appointed it to be served in the sheriff court of Innernes 
to be held by himself or his colleagues in the tolbooth of Perth on 13 June following ; and 
summoned all having interest, and all the barons liberetenentes of the sheriffdoms of Innernes 
and Perth and of other four adjacent sheriffdoms, under pain of a fine of 10 from each person, 
to appear at the said day and place to proceed to the service of the brief. 5 On 13 June accor 
dingly Sir William Scot of Balwery and Alexander Reid of Stralouch, sheriffs of Innernes in 
that part specially appointed to execute the brief, appeared and took oath faithfully to discharge 
their duty ; after which they convened the sheriff court of Innernes in the tolbooth of Perth, 
caused the brief, previously proclaimed at the market cross of Innernes, to be proclaimed also 
at the window of the tolbooth of Perth, and, none objecting to it, proceeded to choose an 
assise to make inquest regarding its contents, and took their oaths according to law in the 
presence of the earl of Sutherland. 6 Immediately before the exit of the assise from court the 
sheriffs demanded of the earl, Who in case of heirs of his body failing should be held as heir 
of his lands and possessions ? 7 The earl replied that his sister-german Elizabeth Sutherland 
the wife of Adam Gordoun, and her offspring i/donie begotten, should, his own heirs failing, 
succeed to his heritage. 8 The earl moreover, as he was naturally of a weak intellect, and was 
strongly desirous that his heritage should not be alienated, chose (on condition that the king's 
license should be obtained) the said Adam Gordoun his sister's husband, and John Sutherland 

1 Sutherland Charters. -' Ibid. 3 Ibid. * Ibid. 5 Ibid. 6 Ibid. ; Ibid. - Ibid. 



GOLSPIE.] PAKOCHIALES. 663 

burgess of Elgin, his curators for managing all his affairs. 1 Earl John died about July of the 
same year. 2 

In 1514 (17 September) James Fidlar sheriff of Innernes in that part appeared at the 
market cross of Innernes, and presented to John Dunnyn one of the sergeants of that town 
a royal letter relating to the serving of a brief obtained by Elizabeth Sutherland the daughter 
and heiress of the deceased earl of Sutherland, and summoned all and sundry to appear in 
the tolbooth of Innernes on 3 October next to witness the service of the brief, and object 
if objections they might have. 3 John Dunnyn accordingly caused the brief to be thrice 
proclaimed at the market cross.* On 3 October Master John Caldor precentor of Eoss, the 
attorney of Elezabeth Suderland the sister of the deceased John earl of Suderland, appeared 
in the sheriff court of Innernes held in the tolbooth by Andrew Auchlek burgess of Innernes 
and sheriff deputed for serving the said brief, produced that brief lawfully proclaimed and 
executed, and caused its execution to be proved in presence of Master Robert Munro the brother 
and procurator of Alexander Suderland, who objected to the brief and claimed a right to the 
contrary. 5 The procurator being unable to show any thing against the brief and its execution, 
or against the members of court, the sheriff proceeded to the election of an assise. 6 The 
procurator then alleging that Alexander Suderland had not access to Innernes by reason of 
the cruelty of Alexander earl of Huntlie and his friends the favourers of Elizabeth Suderland, 
Adam Gordon of Obeyn the husband of Elizabeth for himself and his accomplices offered to 
give security to Alexander that he might return to Innernes. 7 The procurator further alleging 
that the earldom was entailed, but failing to produce the charter of entail, the assise proceeded 
to the service of the brief. 8 The persons on the assise, namely, Thomas Eraser of Lowet. 
John Grant of Fruchy, George Haliburton of Gask, James Fenton of Ogyll, James Dunbar 
of Cumnok, Alexander Cuming of Altir, John Cuming of Ernesyd, Alexander Wrquhard of 
Burrisyardis, David Dunbar of Durris, Alexander Brody of that ilk, David Douglas of Pettin- 
drech, Hugh Ros of Kylraok, Henry Doles of Cantra, William Doles of Bodwyt, Alexander 
Strathaqhyn of Cullodin, John Corbet of Ester Ard, John Waiis of Lochslyne, William 
M'Cullocht of Plaidis, Robert Murref of Fochabris, Robert Wrwell of Schanchar, and Thomas 
Patrikson burgess of Innernes, declared that the deceased John Suderland earl of Suderland, 
the brother german of Elezabetht Suderland, died last vest and seised in the earldom of 
Suderland, its tenants, tenandries, and services of free tenants, and the advowson of the 
chaplainries of Saint John of Helmisdaill and of Saint James in the cathedral church of 
Cathanes, and of all other churches and hospitals in that earldom lying in the sheriffdom of 
Innernes that Elezabetht was his lawful heiress and of lawful age that the earldom was 
then worth yearly 1000 marks Scots, and in time of peace 500 marks that it was held of the 
king in chief by service of ward and relief and that it was then in the king's hands by reason 
of the decease of Earl John, who died about the month of July last, and in defect of Elezabeth 

1 Sutherland Charters. 3 Sutherland Charters. 4 Ibid. 5 Ibid. 

2 See the following references. 6 Ibid. "Ibid. 8 Ibid. 



664 OEIGINES [GOLSPIE. 

prosecuting her right. 1 On 14 October King James V. granted a precept of seisin in 
the earldom in favour of Elizabeth Suthirland.' 2 In 1515 (30 June) the same Elizabeth, the 
wife of Adam Gordoun of Avbyn, on a precept by Alexander earl of Huntly and sheriff of 
Innernes dated 21 May and proceeding on the king's brief, by her attorney James Wysman 
took seisin of the earldom on the soil of Wnys at the hands of George Reidfurd the 
sheriff depute, 3 In the same year (31 August) Adam Gordoun was styled earl of 
Suthirland, and granted a charter which "was witnessed by his son Alexander as master of 
Suthirland. 4 

In 1527, by a contract dated 9 November at Elgin between Elizabeth countess and ' heritare' 
of Sudirland and her husband Adam earl of Sudirland on one part, and their son and apparent 
heir Alexander master of Sudirland on the other, it was agreed that the countess should with the 
consent of her husband resign the earldom in favour of her son Alexander, reserving the liferent 
to themselves .that for this Alexander should ' cause ak" in the books of the official of Moray 
Robert Lines of Innermarky, Robert Innes of Rothmakenze, John Gordon of Lungar, William 
Gordon of Auchindoir, James Gordon of Collquhiddilstoun, John Gordon of Bawchrome, 
George Gordon of Coclaraquhy, and William Gordon of Awochy, and their heirs, executors, 
and assignees, as his sureties, to pay yearly to the countess and the earl, or to the longest 
liver of them, or to their factors at Dunrobin or at Brora in Sudirland, 23 chalders victual, 
22 Scots, 14 (or 12) score ' veddeis of irn,' and 20 marts, in lieu of all the dues of the 
earldom, according to an indenture made on 16 June 1520 between the same countess and 
earl and the deceased John earl of Atholl that, should the countess and earl die before 
giving Alexander's sisters in marriage, Alexander should pay to each of his unmarried sisters 
being of blameless life 100 marks Scots ' to thair mariagis,' and should cause my Lord of 
Huntly to receive John Gordon the brother of Alexander as tenant of the lands of Obeyne, 
and ensure him of the same that, should Alexander with the help of his parents happen 
to lead any process of forfeiture or recognition on any tenandry within the lordship of 
Sudirland, he should with the advice of the countess and earl compound for the same in behalf 
of his brother that notwithstanding the premises the countess and earl should at pleasure 
during life freely intromit with all the lands and dues of the earldom, in the meantime finding 
Alexander and his wife honestly in house with them that Alexander should cause to be 
paid to his parents between the date of the contract and eight days after the next feast of 
Saint Andrew (30 November) 500 marks due to them by the deceased John earl of Atholl, 
and should with them sue that earl's executors for the 'restis and skathis' they had sustained 
for not keeping the contract with him and that the procuratory of resignation should be 
placed in the hands of Alexander Ogylwy of that ilk, and the contract be registered in the 
books of the official of Moray. 5 On the same day (9 November) the parties took oath that 
they would observe the contract, and the countess declared that she was not in any wav 

1 Sutherland Charters. 2 Ibid. 3 Ibid. * Ibid. my hand at the pen be the leding of Schir Dauid 
5 Ibid. This contract is subscribed, Adam erle of Fothringham notar public Alexander Gordoun 
Suthirland Elizabeth countub of Sudirland with mastir of Sudirland. 



GOLSPII:.] PAROCHIALES. 665 

forced by her husband to make the resignation, but made it of her own free will. 1 On 
10 November Elizabeth Suthirland, styling herself countess of Sutherland and hereditary 
lady of the same, with the consent of her husband Adam Gordoun earl of Suthirland, for 
her love towards her firstborn son Alexander Gordoun master of Suthirlande, and for 
other causes, and also by reason of his marriage contracted (after many benefits conferred on 
Elizabeth and her husband) with a noble lady (domicella) Jonet Stewart the daughter of the 
deceased John earl of Atholl, appointed Master William Gordoun and others her procurators 
to resign the earldom in the hands of King James V., reserving the liferent to herself and 
husband, to be held of the king. 3 On 17 November Robert Innes of Innermarky, Robert 
Innes of Ilothnokenze, John Gordon of Lowngar, William Gordon of Crag, James Gordon 
of Tulemenoch, William Gordon of Awoqhy, Thomas Copland of Edocht, and John Gordon 
of Bawquhrom, in name of the master of Suthirland took oath to pay yearly to the countess 
and the earl 23 chalders of victual, 22 Scots, 240 (or 280) < le viddeis' of iron, and 20 
marts, at the ports of Helmisdaill, Dunrobin, or Broray, beginning at the feast of Saint 
Martin (11 November) last and the master and his wife Jonet Steuart took oath yearly 
to relieve their cautioners of those dues at the hands of the earl and countess. 3 On 1 December 
King James V. granted in heritage to Alexander Gordoun, styled the son and apparent heir 
of Adam Gordoun earl of Sutherland and his wife Elizabeth Sutherland countess of Suther 
land, the whole earldom of Sutherland, and all the lands of the earldom, with the castle of 
Dunrobin and all pertinents, resigned by the countess, reserving the liferent to her and 
her husband racione curialitatis Scocie the grantee doing the rights and services due and 
wont. 4 On 20 December Alexander Gordoun was seised in the earldom by John Murray 
of Cambushavy at the principal messuage or fortalice of Dunrobyn. 5 In the same year- 
appears in record John Rattir mair of Sutherland. 6 The master of Sutherland died before 
both his parents in January 1530. 7 The Countess Elizabeth died in September 1535. 8 
In 1536 King James V. granted to George earl of Huntlic the ward, rents, and marriage 
of the lands that belonged to the deceased Alexander Gordoun fear of the earldom of Suthir 
land. 9 Earl Adam died 17 March 1538. 10 In the same year (1 April) King James V. 
granted to Sir John Campbell of Caldour the mails, nonentries, wards, reliefs, and other 
dues, in the king's hands by the decease of Alexander Gordoun master of Suthirland, of 
his father Adam earl of Suthirland, and of his mother Elizabeth Suthirland countess of 
Suthirland. 11 

' Sutherland Charters. - Ibid. * Genealogy of the Earls of Sutherland, p. 103 See 

3 Ibid. Subscribed by six of the cautioners, and by also the retour of 1546 post. 

Allexander mastir of Sutherland, and Jonet Steuart 9 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. x. fol. 97. 

with my hand at the pen. "' Genealogy of the Earls, p. 103. 

' Ihid., Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxii. no. 32. " Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xi. fol. GS. The authorities cited 

' Sutherland Charters. in this and the preceding note, and the retour of 154(! 

6 Ibid. cited below, prove that the Countess Elizabeth died in 

7 Ibid. Sir Robert Gordon says 15 January 1529 1535, and her husband Earl Adam in 1538. Yet a 
("the year being correct according to the old reckon- retour of 1591 places the death of the countess in 153U. 
ing). and that of the earl in 1541 (1542). 



666 ORIGINES [UOLSPIK. 

In 1546 (4 May) inquest was made in the tolbooth of the burgh of Innernes in the presence 
of George earl of Huntlie sheriff principal by William M'Kintoche of Dunnachtan, Kcnzeoche 
M'Kenze of Brayne, Eobert Monro of Fowlis, Robert Innes of Innermarky, James Dunbar 
of Terbet, Robert Dunbar of Durris, Hugh Ros of Kilrawak, John Hay of Park, Alexander 
Cummyng of Altir, Alexander Kynnard of Cowbyne, John Grant of Culcabok, Jarnes Dunbar 
of Conze, Thomas Brody of that ilk, George Monro of Dawachcarte, Alexander Baize constable 
of Innernes, James Vrquhart burgess of Fores, and Robert Vaus burgess of Innernes, who 
declared that the deceased Alexander Gordone master of Sutherland, the father of John 
Gordone, died last vest and seised in the earldom of Sutherland, its lands, and the castle 
or manor of Dunrobin that John Gordone was his heir and of lawful age that the earldom 
was worth at the time 1000 marks yearly, and in time of peace 500 marks that it was held 
of the queen by service of ward and relief that by the decease of Alexander Gordone it 
had been in the queen's hands by reason of ward for 3 years and 5 months since the death of 
King James V., in whose hands it had been for the same reason for 5 years preceding his 
dead, an( l that it had been also in the hands of the deceased Adam Gordone and his wife 
Elezabeth Sutherland for 8 years following the month of January 1529 (1530) by reason of 
liferent and of John Gordone not prosecuting his claim. 1 On 7 June at the messuage or 
castle of Dunrobin and on the soil of the earldom James Patirsone sheriff depute of Innernes 
in that part gave seisin of the earldom on a precept by Queen Mary to John Gordone the 
procurator of John Gordone earl of Sutherland as the heir of his deceased father Alexander. 2 
On 6 August Queen Mary granted in heritage to the same earl and to the lady Elizabeth 
Campbell countess of Murray the lands of the earldom of Suthirland with the tower and 
t'ortalice of Dunrobyn, resigned by the earl, the grantee paying the rights and services formerly 
due. 3 On 13 October James Patirsone gave seisin of the earldom to the earl and his countess 
at the castle and on the lands of Dunrobin.* On 10 December seisin of certain lands granted 
by the earl to Alexander Terrell was witnessed by Donald Williamsone alias Skallag the earl's 
mair and officer. 5 In 1558 a seisin of the prebend of Helmisdaill was witnessed by the same 
Donald Williamson, styled officer of Suthirland. 6 In 1563 (22 September) Queen Mary 
granted in heritage to her brother Robert Stewart junior the lands and baronies of the earldom 
of Sutherland both property and tenandry, namely, the lands of Sutherland with the castle 
and fortalico of Dunrobin and the whole manor of the same ; the lands and town of Nevindell ; 
the towns of Eistir Garthe, Mydgarthe, and W'estir Garthe, Cowlegowre, Mekle Lothe, Craigok, 
Litil Lothe with the mill, Clyntredwane, and Brora with the fishings ; half the lands of Doill ; 
Vppate, Innerbo Heiche and Laiche, Clayside, Mallecht, Allertoun, Golspiemoir, Ruves, 
Culmaliemoir with the mill, Culmalie-craigtoun ; Strabrora, Dalpoldie, Westkelziebeg, West- 
kelziemoir with the mill, Kilnabrair, Kyllane ; half the lands of Carroll ; Larg, Schennynes, 
Moy with the mill, Rine, Cragie ; the lands of Grudy, Plaide, Petfuire, Clynall, Pittarkessie 

1 Sutherland Charters. 2 Ibid. 4 Sutherland Charters. 

3 Ibid. Reg. Mag. Sig., lib. xxix. no. 370. Reg. Sec. Ibid. 

Sig., vol. xx. fol. !>7. 6 Ibid. 



UOLSPIE.] PAROCHIALES. 667 

with the mill, Auchannye ; Holmisday (Helmisdayll) with the water and fishings ; the lands 
of Borryboill, Killarnanes Eister and Wester with the mill ; Vlbister, Gyllyboll, Lyriboll, 
Borroboll, Altreboll, the Glen of Loth, and the Glen of Dunrobene ; as property also the 
tenandries of the lands of Skebo with the demesne lands of the same ; the lands of Eister 
Skebo ; half the lands of Doill ; Cowle, Petnane, Bellwraith, Cammusowe, Westir Abbirscors, 
Litilrod, Mornes, Innerschine with the fishings, Auchindwycht, Mechall, Ardinsche, Torrobull, 
Kynmowie, Dola, Blaroquhy, Lady, Langwell, Pettintraill, Pitfwir, Knokartoll, Pronssecastell, 
Pronssenayne, Pronssecroy, Evillik, Askadell, Rearcheare, the barony of Promesy, Mekle Torbo, 
Litill Torbo, Dalnamayne, Grudiebrora, Scheborskaik, Kilpeddermoir, Kilpedderbeg, Kilpedder 
in Straithvlze, Cayne, Kintraid, Kynnald, Kilchallumkillie, Golspietwir, Dawachbeg, Rewy- 
kirktoun, Rewy-craigtoun, Inchecaip, Rossaill, Auchcailze, Eister Abirscors, Auchindrow, 
Drummoy, Bakkeis, Torreis, Clyneles, Clynemylne with the mill, the half of Kirktoun of Clyne, 
Dalcallum, and the lands of Eastside of Brora lying on the east side of the bridge all forfeited 
by John earl of Sutherland. 1 In 1564 (27 May) the queen confirmed the grant. 2 In 1565 
(15 January) she renewed or again confirmed it, and re-erected the earldom in favour of the 
same Robert Stewart, appointing the castle of Dunrobene to be the principal messuage. 3 

Between the years 1538 and 1563 Earl John, especially after attaining his majority in 1545 
or 1546, had a considerable share in various public events both in Sutherland and in other parts, 
and especially in the battle of Pinkie fought in 1547, and in the matters which led to the conflict 
at Corrichie in 1562. 4 During his forfeiture he resided abroad, and seems to have returned 
to Scotland in 1565 or early in 1566. 5 In the latter year (27, 28, and 31 May, and 1 June) 
Gilbert Gordoun in Golspetovr and Alexander Tarrell of Doill, bailies in that part, on a precept 
by Henry and Mary king and queen of Scots, at the place and fortalice of Dunrobin near the 
well of the same, and at the following lands and castles, gave seisin to John Kennedy the 
procurator of John carl of Sutherland in those lands and castles belonging to the earldom, 
namely, the lands of Nauadaill, Borroboll, Estir Killernan, Vestir Killernan with the mill of the 
same ; the lands of Vlbister, Galzeboll, Lereboll, Askraig, Altreboll, Cayan and Kilpedder in 
Straythwlzie with the mill of the same ; Auchadill ; the water of Helmisdaill with the salmon 
fishings ; Eister Garthe, Myd Garthe with the mill, Vastir Garthe, Culgour, Mekle Lotht, 
Crakok, Litill Lotht with the mill, the Glen of Lotht, Clynetredwane with the mill, Clynemullin 
with the mill, the half of Clynekirktoun, Clynelys, Daligallum, Brora Eist and Vest Syde with 
the salmon fishing ; the lands of Doill, Carroll, Culnabrayr, Delfoldyn, Vest Kelziebeg, Vest 
Kelziemoir with the mill, Kyllin, Gillecallumkille, Kilpeddirmoir, Kilpeddirbeg with the mill, 
Sevirscraig, Grudebrora, Carnameyne ; the lands of Vppat, Inverboll, Clayeside, Mellok, Dun- 
robbin with the tower, fortalice, place, houses, orchards, gardens, and pertinents, the mill of 
Golspye, the Glen of Dunrobbin, Allartoun, Bakkeis, Golspetowr, Golspemoir, Ruiifis, Kyl- 
mailzemoir with the mill, Drummoy, Kilmailziecragtoun, Eistir Aberscors, Vestir Abirscors ; 

1 Reg. Sec. Sig., vol. xxxii. fol. 5. Earl John was 4 Genealogy of the Earls, pp. 106-149. Buch. Hist.. 
forfeited for treason and lese-majesty on 28 May 1563. lib. xvii. c. 38. 
3 Ibid., fol. 70. 3 Ibid., fol. 138. 5 Genealogy of the Earls, p. 144. 



668 ORIGINES [GOLSVIE. 

Knokaitholl, Kynnakle with the mill ; Litill Reorde, Morenes, Pitfuyr with the mill, Pittintraill 
with the mill, Kynbraid, Dawachbeg, Roykirktoun, Roycragtoun, Inchekipe, Rosall, Auchawelle, 
Blarocht, Leady, Langoll, Moy, Reynde, Craggie, Kynmonovy, Leargis, Schinenes, Edderdachelis ; 
the lands of Gruyde, Pleddis, Pitfuyr, Pettarkassie with the mill, Auchannye, Innersohin with 
the salmon fishins*, Auchindaucht, Torreboll, Dolaye, Mekle, Ardinche ; the lands of Casteltoun 
of Skelbo, with the place, fortalice, mill, and pertinents, Cambussave, Balnabraide, Pitmanyn, 
Andandro, Eistir Skelbo, Cowle, Prompsecastell, Prompsenayne, Prompsecroy, Awalek with the 
mill, Askisdaill, Rearquhar, Dalnameyne, Mekle Torboll with the mill, Litill Torboll ; with the 
castles, towers, fortalices, mills, fishings, woods, advowsons, annexis, connexis, outseittis, parts, 
pendicles, and pertinents ; together with the advowson of the benefices of Saint Andrew called 
Golspiekirktoun, of the chaplainry of Saint John of Helmisdaill, and of the chaplainry of Saint 
James of Dornocht, and all other benefices of the earldom resigned by the queen's natural 
brother Robert Stewart, to whom they belonged in heritage, and erected anew by the queen 
into the earldom of Sutherland, the castle of Dunrobin to be the chief messuage. 1 In 1567 
(9 April) the process of forfeiture against Earl John was reduced by a decree of parliament.' 2 
In the same year (23 June) inquest was made in the tolbooth of the burgh of Innernis before 
James Innes of Dranye, James Patirsone provost of Innernis, and Alexander Baillie of Dunnane, 
sheriffs depute, by Alexander Ros of Balnagown, Robert Monro of Fowlis, Walter Wrquhart 
sheriff of Cromertie, John Innes of Innerbraky, George Monro of Dawachcarte, Thomas Dingvell 
of Kildwn, Alexander Chessolme of Commer, Murdoch M'Kenzie of Forbryne, Alexander Bane 
of Tullich, John Stewart of Kyncarne, John Name of Cromdell, John Gray of Swordell, Hugh 
Murray of Aberscors, William Murray of Spanzedell, Thomas Poilson of Cresmoye (Crechmoyr), 
John Hay of Perk, Alexander Murray in Dornoch, Thomas Murray, and John and Alexander 
Lewall of Craggy, who declared that Adam earl of Sutherland, the grandfather of John earl 
of Sutherland, died at the peace and faith of King James V., and that Earl John was his lawful 
heir and of lawful ago and that he was likewise the lawful heir of his grandmother Elizabeth 
countess of Sutherland, who also died at the king's peace. 3 The earl and his lady are said 
to have died by poison at the castle of Helmisdale, the earl's son and successor Alexander 
narrowly escaping the same fate. 4 

In 1573 Alexander earl of Suthirland complained to King James VI. that, although he was 
desirous to serve the king's briefs of inquest of the lands in the sheriffdoms of Innernes and 
Abirdene in which his father Earl John died vest and seised, he was unable to serve the brief 
of inquest of the lands in Innernes in the tolbooth of the burgh, because he could find no 
inquest of barons and hereditary proprietors within the sheriffdom for that purpose by reason 
that many barons and gentlemen of the sheriffdom, such as Colin Makkanze of Kintaill, Hugh 
Lord Fraser of Lovet, Lauchlan Mukintosche of Dunnauchtane, Robert Monro of Fowlis, with 
many other families and men of the country, were at deadly feud among themselves. 5 The 

1 Sutherland Charters. 4 Genealogy of the Earls, pp. 146, 147. * 

2 Ibid. Genealogy of the Earls, pp. 145, 146. 5 Paper at Dunrobin (extract from the burgh records 
J Sutherland Charters. of Aberdeen). 



GOLSPIE.] PAEOCHIALES. 669 

king therefore (30 May), with the consent of George earl of Huntlie sheriff principal of Inner- 
nes and Abirdene, appointed John Leslie of Buchquhane, Gilbert Menzeis apparent of Petfod- 
dellis, Patrick Menzeis burgess of Abirdene, Master Kobert Lummisdane of Clova, and Master 
Patrick Ruthirfurde burgess of Abirdene, sheriffs of Innernes in that part, to serve the said 
briefs in the tolbooth of the burgh of Abirdene. 1 On 13 June accordingly John Kennedy the 
attorney of Earl Alexander appeared in the burgh court of Abirdene held in the tolbooth by 
Master George Middiltoun one of the bailies, and presented the king's commission. 2 Thereafter 
the sheriffs took the oath of fidelity, and held their court in the tolbooth, when John Kennedy 
presented the king's brief, and the sheriffs delivered it to the officers of court to be proclaimed 
at the market cross of Innernes and served on 8 July next, and meantime ordered the king's 
commission to be engrossed in their books. 3 On 8 July Master William Dauidson and Master 
George Barclay, appointed by the earl his procurators in all actions, presented to the sheriffs 
in court the king's brief duly executed, the proclamation was certified by the officers, and, none 
objecting, the brief was submitted to the following assise, namely, Andrew Master of Erroll 
chancellor, James Dunbar of Tarbet, Alexander Dunbar of Conze, Archibald Dunbar of Pennek, 
John Gray of Sordell, William Hay of Delgaty, Thomas Gumming of Alter, Robert Turing of 
Fowerane, William Setoun of Meldrum, John Pantoun of Petmeddene, James Murray of Cov- 
bardy, Hutcheone Murray of Abirshorss, James Patirsoun provost of Innernes, George Gordoun 
of Auchmengzye, Andrew Meldrum of Darley, Andrew Myln in Estir Bin, and James Dunbar 
in Kintassacht. 4 On the same day the earl's procurators produced in court an instrument of the 
lands of the earldom contained in a petition dated 6 June 1546 ; a retour of the deceased John 
earl of Sutherland in those lands dated 4 May of the same year ; a decreet of the constitution 
of parliament reducing the process of forfeiture against that earl, dated at Edinburgh 9 April 
1567 and subscribed by Master James Makgill clerk of register ; and an attestation of the 
decreet by James Ballindene dated 25 May 1573, by which Earl Alexander's age might be 
known whereupon the assise unanimously served the earl heir to his father Earl John, deter 
mining the yearly value of the earldom, as before, to be 500 marks in time of peace, and at the 
date of the inquest 1000 marks. 5 On 17 July James Innes of Towchis sheriff depute of Inner 
nes in that part gave seisin of the earldom to the earl's procurator John Kennedy burgess of 
Banf at the castle of Dunrobyne and at the gates of the same. 6 In 1581 (18 March) Earl 
Alexander resigned the earldom with the castle of Dunrobin in favour of his eldest son John 
master of Sudirland, reserving the liferent to himself ; and King James VI. (23 March) granted 
the same to John in heritage. 7 In 1583 Adam Gordone in Culgowyr at the gates of the castle 
of Dunroben took seisin of the earldom for the same John, saving Earl Alexander's liferent. 8 
In 1591 the following assise, namely, Andrew Monro of Newmoyr, John Vaus of Lochslyne, 
William Eraser of Strowy, John Chessolme of Commyr, James Corbet portioner of Arkboll, 
Alexander Eraser of Gussoquhan, John Cuthbert of Old Castle, John Vinstyr of Artrelle, 
William Baize of Dunnayne, Luke Patirsone burgess of Innernes, John Corbet apparent 

1 Paper at Dunrobin (extract from the burgh records 6 Sutherland Charters. 

of Aberdeen). 2 Ibid. 3 Ibid. * Ibid. 5 Ibid. " Ibid. s Ibid. The seisin is witnessed by the earl. 
VOL. II. 4 Q 



670 OEIGINES [GOLSPIE. 

portioner of Arkboll, Gilbert Gollan burgess of Innernes, James Abram burgess of the same, 
Findlaw Donaldson burgess of the same, and John Eraser in Incherore, served Alexander earl 
of Suderland heir to his great-grandfather Adam Gordone earl of Suderland, who died in 
January 1541 (1542), and to his great-grandmother Elizabeth countess of Suderland, who died 
in September 1539. 1 Earl Alexander died in 1594, and was succeeded by his son John. 2 

In 1601 (29 April) King James VI. granted anew to John earl of Sutherland, and to his 
heirs male and of entail got between him and his wife the lady Anna Elphingstoun countess of 
Sutherland, with remainder to his own heirs male of his body, to his brother german Robert 
Gordoun and the heirs male of his body, to his brother german Alexander Gordoun and the 
heirs male of his body, and to Adam Gordoun the lawful son of George marquis of Huntlie and 
his heirs male whomsoever, the earldom of Sutherland and the Castle of Dunrobene with all 
pertinents, resigned by the earl also a davach of Knokfyn, a davach of Ere, a davach of 
Swyisgill, a davach of Kynbrasche, two davachs of Kyldonan, two davachs of Dwyboill, a 
davach of Balnabaleach, and a davach of Helmisdaill with the pendicles of the same called 
Achaadaleyis, alienated by the earl's predecessors to the earls of Caithnes, and resigned by 
George then earl of Caithnes in favour of Earl John also the lands and barony of Ear with 
the waters and salmon fishings, the lands of Armedaill and Straith with the waters and salmon 
fishings, Eenew, Kynnald, Golspetor, Delreid, Cattak, Broniche, Killicalumkill, Dawach Loch- 
naver, Dawach Ereboill, two pennylands in Strone, the island of Sanda, namely, three penny- 
lands there, the island of Haga extending to two pennylands, the lands of Millines and Hoip 
with the waters and salmon fishings, Galdwell, Balnahacles, Skelpik, Mowadell, Mekill Grub, 
Litill Grub, Syre, Carnoch, Innernaver, Thorisdaill with the waters and salmon fishings, Mekill 
Borge, Litill Borge, Kirkboyll, Tung, Skrabister, Kennyside, Candloch, Edderdawachellis, the 
water of Torrisdaill with its fishings, Awchynes, Clybrek, Langoill, Eosuall, Eaygill, Ardnedell, 
Skarre, Lettirlyoll, Lettirwyndeschoir, Ardnaboill, Houndland, Strathoridaill, the island of 
, the mills of Tung, Far, and Kynnald, with the multures and sucken, with all pertinents, 
resigned by Earl John. 3 King James moreover for the earl's good service annexed to the earl 
dom Knokfyn and the other lands resigned by the earl of Caithnes, and Far and the other 
lands resigned by Earl John and, understanding that the earldom had been granted in free 
regality to the earl's predecessors by David King of Scots and other kings, and for other reasons, 
erected the earldom and the annexed lands into one free regality with free chapel and chancel- 
lary and all other privileges. 4 The king also, understanding that the earl had undergone great 
expense in the construction of houses and for policy (pro policia) upon the Inver of Bruray in 
the earldom of Sutherland to the great advantage of the king's lieges and others, erected the 
Inver of Bruray, its lands, tofts, crofts, outsettis, and pertinents, in favour of the earl and his 
said heirs, into a free burgh of barony and regality to be called the burgh of Innerbroray, with 
power to create bailies, councillors, burgesses, sergeants, and other officers, and to remove the 
same ; with power to the burgesses ad lie pak et peill, and of buying and selling in the burgh 

1 Sutherland Charters. For the true dates of the 2 Genealogy of the Earis, p. 233. 
deaths of Earl Adam and his countess see above, p. 665. :i Sutherland Charters. 4 Ibid. 



GOLSPIE.] PAROCHIALES. 671 

wine and wax, cloth woollen and linen, broad and narrow, and all other articles of merchan 
dise and staple goods (stapule bona*), and of admitting into the burgh fishers, brewers, 
laniatores, sellers of fish, sartares, shoemakers, weavers, allutarii, scissores, carpenters, smiths, 
and all other necessary tradesmen ; with power also to build a tolbooth, to have a market 
cross with a weekly market on Saturday, together with four free yearly fairs on the feasts of 
the Conception (8 December), of Saint Peter the apostle (29 June), of Saint Peter ad vin- 
cula (1 August), and of Saint Michael (29 September), to hold a market at each of those fairs 
for the space of two days, and to collect the entire customs and apply them for the good of the 
burgh ; with all other privileges. 1 The king moreover, understanding that the following lands 
and other subjects, partly in Sutherland and partly in Caithnes, and in the sheriffdom of 
Innernes, belonged in heritage to the earl, and before the annexation of ecclesiastical lands 
were held of the bishop of Caithnes, and were then held of the king, namely, the lands and 
towns of Galdwell, Caldell, Crammage, Barolye, Slanys, Astlermoir, Astlerbeg, Sandewatt, 
Tarriagavis, Crannamannycht, Carnogarraw, with the mills and fishings, and with the fishings 
of Laxfurde, and the water of Ardurines and the ' cruvis' of the same, the island of Hoa 
with the other islands there and their fishings; the lands of Kilmalekirktoun with the pen- 
dicles of the same called Auchnacalzie ; the lands of Stambuster, the half of Brymmes, Fors 
with the mills and fishings, Baillie, two thirds of Lythmoir with two pennylands of the (other) 
third part of Lythmoir, two thirds of the lands of Owist ; the lands of Dorarie and Myrre- 
michaellis ; 9i pennylands of Skrabister, with the ' castell wairdis' and Langag of Skrabister 
and the fishings of the same, with the Sklaitheuch and Halkes in Hoburneheid ; 10 penny- 
lands of Weik and Papigo with the crofts called the Bischopis Quoyis and Kenzeochis Quoyis, 
with the other crofts there and the tenements in the town of Weik and the superiority of 
the same ; the lands of Southkilmister and Northkilmister with the mill of Wyndles ; three 
' ottonnyrlandis' in Myrelandmoir, with the teindsheaves of all the above lands ; the lands 
of Mekill Vllagrahame, Littil Vllagrahame, and Halkrig, with the mills, fishings, and ' cruvis ;' 
the lands of Westerdaill, Esterdaill, Thormesdaill, with the fourth part of the salmon fishing 
in the water of Thurso ; a pennyland of Subamster, the lands of Diran, Alterwell with th